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Results for search "Infant / Child Care".

20 Oct

Certain Baby Bottles May Release Microplastics During Formula Preparation, New Study Finds.

These findings highlight the need for further research into the effects of microplastics on human health, researchers say.

Health News Results - 162

Few Kids Get Dental Fluoride Treatments, Though Insurance Will Pay

Very few privately insured young children get recommended dental fluoride treatments at health wellness visits, even though insurance typically covers them, a new study finds.

"Medical providers are not required to do this; it's like a mammogram," said lead author Kimberley Geissler, an associate professor of health policy and management at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. "It's r...

Mom's Exercise in Pregnancy May Help Baby's Lungs

Exercising during pregnancy can benefit babies' lungs, Scandinavian researchers report.

"This study offers a fascinating hint that increased physical activity of mothers is associated with better lung function in their babies and, therefore, possibly their health in later life," said Jonathan Grigg, head of the European Respiratory Society Tobacco Control Committee, who was not involved i...

Breastfeeding May Strengthen a Baby's Heart

Breast milk can give preemies' hearts a big boost, a groundbreaking study suggests.

"This study … adds to the already known benefits of breast milk for infants born prematurely," said study leader Dr. Afif El-Khuffash, a clinical professor of pediatrics at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) University of Medicine and Health Sciences in Dublin.

He said the findings off...

Soothing Sound: Mom's Voice Eases Preemies' Pain

Mothers are known for drying their little ones' tears, sometimes with a hug, a song or a kiss on a scraped knee.

So, perhaps it isn't a surprise that new research shows the sounds of mom's voice provide comfort and even pain relief to the tiniest ones, premature babies.

Researchers from the University of Geneva in Switzerland found that not only did the sound of a mother talking o...

Toppling TVs, Furniture Sending Many Young Children to ERs

It can happen in an instant. A young child climbs a heavy piece of furniture, and it topples over on the toddler.

New research suggests that's not as rare as you might think: Hundreds of thousands of children have been treated in U.S. emergency rooms for such injuries in recent decades.

"Some families may not think that heavy furniture or TVs can tip over, but they do, and when this...

As Classes Resume, Some Health Tips From the CDC

Students face a number of challenges as they head back to school this fall -- from potential exposure to COVID-19 and other illnesses to injuries on the playing field.

"This return to school season is like no other," said Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Schools must be prepared to protect children from COVID-19, while also addressin...

For Better Breastfeeding, 'Lactation Consultants' Can Help

Breastfeeding provides a baby with many positive benefits, but it doesn't always happen easily.

When a new mom feels overwhelmed by the challenge, a lactation consultant can help, according to two breastfeeding experts from Penn State Health.

"We're here to make sure new moms can get to where they want to be with their infant -- breastfeeding with ease and confidence," said Nancy Mc...

RSV Respiratory Illnesses Rising for Babies, Experts Warn

While the resurgence of COVID-19 cases in the United States has been dominating the news, an old viral enemy has been making a quieter comeback.

In late spring, U.S. pediatric hospitals began reporting an unexpected rise in serious infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

Unlike COVID-19, RSV is a long-established foe that normally emerges in late fall, peaks in the ...

'Preemie' Babies More Vulnerable to Autism Diagnosis Later: Study

Babies born prematurely, even just a couple weeks early, may be at increased risk of autism, a large new study suggests.

It's long been known that autism, a developmental brain disorder, is more common among children who were born preterm -- before the 37th week of pregnancy.

Researchers said the new study, of more than 4 million people, gives a clearer breakdown of the risks associ...

The Heat Is On: Staying Safe When Temperatures Soar

Midsummer heat and high humidity aren't just uncomfortable -- they're a combo that can cause serious illness and even death.

"Whenever you walk or do outdoor activity, take a friend with you who can help you if you run into trouble," Dr. Eleanor Dunham advised. She's an emergency medicine doctor at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pa.

Babies and seniors...

Big Road Trip This Weekend? Keep Baby Safe

If you're hitting the road with your infant this summer, you need to ensure your child's safety and comfort, a pediatric expert says.

First, check your car safety seat to make sure it's installed according to the manufacturer's instructions. It needs to be rear-facing and at the correct angle to prevent your infant's head from slumping and potentially blocking the airway, Dr. Dina DiMaggi...

Breastfed Babies Have Healthier Blood Pressure as Kids

Here's another reason for new moms to give breastfeeding a try: Toddlers who were breastfed for even a few days have lower blood pressure than those who always got a bottle, research finds.

And lower blood pressure at an early age may lead to a healthier heart and blood vessels in adulthood, researchers said.

The new study is believed to be the first to investigate breastfeeding in...

Prescriptions for U.S. Kids Declined During Pandemic

Prescriptions for U.S. children fell by about one-quarter during the COVID-19 pandemic, with prescriptions for antibiotics alone plunging by more than 50%, a new study finds.

The findings are a "national picture of prescription drug dispensing to children before and during the pandemic. It will be important to monitor whether the reductions we demonstrate are temporary or sustained," said...

Drowning Deaths for U.S. Kids Have Fallen 38% Since 1999

There's some good news as millions of American children head back to the nations' lakes, beaches and pools: Newly released numbers for 1999 through 2019 show steady progress in reducing the number of young lives lost to drowning.

"Over the past two decades, the rate of unintentional drowning deaths among children aged 0 to 17 years declined 38%, from 1.6 per 100,000 in 1999 to 1.0 in 2019...

Parent's Words Key to Young Kids' Fears Around Vaccination

What's the best way to help your young child handle the stress of getting shots? New research claims that perfectly timed encouragement makes all the difference with vaccinations.

"What we found is that in the first minute after the needle, the more parents said coping-promoting statements, such as, 'You can do this' and 'It will be over soon' or tried to distract them with talking about ...

COVID Vaccine Doesn't Infiltrate Breast Milk

Women who are breastfeeding and wonder if COVID-19 vaccination is safe for their baby may be reassured by the results of a new study.

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, report that "vaccine-associated mRNA" -- the active components of the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines -- "was not detected in 13 milk samples collected 4 to 48 hours after vaccination from 7 breastfeed...

Key to Good Sleep for Toddlers Starts in Infancy

Introducing bedtime routines very early in life can improve sleep habits in the toddler years, according to a new study.

Almost 500 new mothers were first surveyed when their infants were 3 months old. They were questioned again when the children were 12 months, 18 months and 24 months.

The mothers were asked about their child's sleep habits, including bedtime and wake time...

Alcohol Still a Threat in Too Many American Pregnancies: Study

More than half of American babies are exposed to at least some alcohol before they are born -- and for 8 out of 10, it happens before their mothers even realize they're pregnant, according to a Yale University study.

Because alcohol consumption may harm the developing fetus, researchers said their findings underscore the need to promote abstinence in women who are pregnant or trying to be...

More Evidence Spanking Kids Doesn't Work, Can Cause Harm

Is spanking good for parents? Is spanking good for kids? Is spanking good for anyone? No, no and no, according to a big new review of prior research.

"Zero studies found that physical punishment predicted better child behavior over time," said study co-author Elizabeth Gershoff, a professor of human development and family sciences at the University of Texas at Austin.

She and her t...

Pandemic Day Care Closures Forced 600,000 U.S. Working Moms to Leave Jobs

When child care centers were forced to close in the pandemic's early months, hundreds of thousands of American working mothers lost their jobs, new research shows.

The study is just the latest illustration of the toll the pandemic has taken on working women in the United States.

Over the first 10 months of the U.S. pandemic, more than 2.3 million women left the labor force, accordin...

High Curiosity in Infancy Carries Through to Toddler Years

Using a bit of sleight of hand, researchers were able to demonstrate that babies who were the most intrigued with magic tricks became the most curious toddlers.

The children's early delight in the unexpected could be a sign of their future thinking skills, the researchers said.

"Something about a baby's curiosity about magic tricks is predicting how curious they become as preschoole...

1 in 4 Parents Worries Their Young Child Isn't Reaching Milestones: Poll

As babies and toddlers grow, parents may feel excited about their little one learning to crawl, walk or talk.

But these same milestones can also raise concerns when parents fear their child may not be developing normally. Nearly a quarter of parents -- 23% -- who participated in a new nationwide poll said they had worried that their child had developmental delays.

Most reached out t...

Spanish Spoken at Home? It Won't Slow Youngsters Learning English: Study

Being in a Spanish-speaking home doesn't hamper American kids' ability to learn English, new research shows.

The first-of-its-kind study included 126 U.S.-born 5-year-olds who were exposed to Spanish at home from birth, along with varying amounts of English.

Researchers found that the kids not only learn English reliably, their total language knowledge is greater to the degree that...

Sharing Bed With Baby: Dangerous, and It Won't Boost 'Attachment,' Study Shows

Whether to share your bed with your infant at night has been the subject of heated debate: The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) advises against it, recommending room-sharing but not bed-sharing, while others promote the practice as part of an idea called attachment parenting.

Now, a new study finds bed-sharing did nothing to boost mother-infant bonding.

"I wanted to study this i...

$10,000: What New Parents Might Pay for Childbirth, Even With Insurance

Having a baby is expensive. The cost of diapers, a crib, a car seat and all the other infant necessities can really add up, and now a new study shows that having a child comes with its own hefty hospital price tag for many U.S. families.

About one in six families in the Michigan Medicine study spent more than $5,000 to have a baby. For privately insured families whose babies required time...

Babies Produce Strong Immune Response to Ward Off COVID-19: Study

British researchers report that babies have a strong immune response to the virus that causes COVID-19, based on a new, small study.

For the research, the investigators assessed the immune systems of four infants under 3 months of age who had recovered from COVID, and compared them with adults who also had recovered from the disease.

Compared to adults, the babies produced relative...

Skin-to-Skin Contact Could Boost Survival of Very Premature Babies

In a finding that demonstrates the power of a mother's touch, new research shows that immediate and continuous skin-to-skin contact with mom reduces the risk of death for low-weight newborns in poorer nations.

"The idea of giving skin-to-skin contact immediately after delivery to very small, unstable babies has encountered quite strong resistance, but about 75% of deaths occur before the ...

Are Babies With Seizures Overmedicated?

Long-term use of anti-seizure medications in babies who had seizures soon after birth may not be necessary and could be harmful, a new study suggests.

Newborns who have seizures after birth are at risk of long-term conditions such as developmental delays, cerebral palsy or epilepsy, so they're given anti-seizure medication to treat the electrical brain disturbances that cause their seizur...

For Toddlers, More Time Watching Screens Mean Less Time Reading

Is too much screen time turning kids off of books?

New research suggests that's so: Toddlers who regularly spent time on electronic devices -- including tablets, smartphones and TVs -- were less likely to read print books with their parents at age 3. That, in turn, translated to even more screen use by age 5.

The findings do not prove definitively that early exposure to electronic d...

Parents' Input Key When Screening Toddlers for Autism

Early screening for autism can speed up diagnosis and treatment, and now new research shows that pediatricians are more likely to act when parents express concerns.

According to pediatricians surveyed in the study, only 39% of toddlers who had failed a screening looking for autism signs were then referred to additional expert evaluation.

"The lack of referral follow-through was beca...

Good Bacteria Aren't Present in Baby's Gut Before Birth

Bacteria don't set up house in the human gut until after birth, a new study finds.

Gut bacteria are vital for digestion and overall health, but when researchers examined the stool (meconium) from 20 infants collected during breech cesarean deliveries, they found these critical germs show up in the gut after birth, not before.

"The key takeaway from our study is we are not colonized...

Why C-Section Babies May Be at Higher Risk for a Food Allergy

Could there be a link between having a C-section and your baby's chances of developing a peanut allergy?

Yes, a team of Canadian researchers warns.

Their new study found that babies born via cesarean section appear to have relatively low levels of so-called Bacteroides, a specific form of bacteria that is key to the proper development of a child's immune system.

The findi...

Will Baby Have Allergies? First Poop Might Tell

An infant will generate a lot of poop during the first year of life, but the very first one may offer key clues about the risk of developing allergies.

Researchers analyzed samples of meconium from 100 babies enrolled in the CHILD Cohort Study, a long-term health study of children in Canada. Meconium is a dark green substance composed of what the fetus ingests and excretes while in the wo...

Being Born Even a Bit Early Might Hamper Child's Development

Being born even slightly premature might still raise a child's risk of developmental problems, a new study finds.

Preemies often have developmental issues, but previous research has tended to focus on those born extremely preterm (22-26 weeks' gestation), so less is known about children born moderately and very preterm (27-34 weeks' gestation). Average full-term gestation time is 39-40 we...

Did CBD Oil for Seizures Push a 2-Year-Old Boy Into Puberty?

CBD oil used to curb seizures in a 2-year-old with epilepsy may be linked to the boy developing signs of a very early puberty, a British case study reports.

The incident is outlined in the April 15 issue of the journal BMJ Case Reports.

Doctors reported that since birth the boy had experienced about 20 seizures a day and they were increasing over time. Prior research has su...

Newborns Won't Get COVID Through Infected Mom's Breast Milk: Study

A new study offers more reassurance that mothers infected with SARS-CoV-2 can safely breastfeed their babies.

The study of 55 infants born to moms with COVID-19 found that none contracted the virus -- even though most started getting breast milk in the hospital.

Researchers said the findings support existing advice from public health authorities. Last year, the World Health Organiza...

Is Empathy Born in Mom's First Hugs?

Show your baby your love, and you'll get a kinder, gentler adult child as your reward, a new study suggests.

More than 20 years ago, researchers in Israel began studying the impact on newborns of time spent in physical contact with their mothers.

The investigators followed these infants, born in the mid- to late-1990s, for two decades.

Now, their latest results -- based on n...

Spotting Asthma in Your Baby or Toddler

Diagnosing babies and toddlers with asthma is challenging, because it's difficult to measure lung function in this young group. What makes diagnosis easier is knowing your child's symptoms.

A leading pediatrics group offers some tips for parents who suspect their infants or toddlers may have asthma or are having symptoms that could suggest another health condition.

Your pediatrician...

Kids' ER Visits for Swallowed Magnets Soared After U.S. Lifted Sales Ban

Calls to U.S. poison centers about incidents involving children and high-powered magnets surged more than 400% after a court overturned a ban on the magnets, a new study finds.

"Regulations on these products were effective, and the dramatic increase in the number of high-powered magnet related injuries since the ban was lifted - even compared to pre-ban numbers - is alarming," said Dr. Le...

Social Distancing Probably Stopped 2020 Outbreak of Paralyzing Disorder in Kids

Social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic appears to have prevented an anticipated outbreak of a rare polio-like syndrome in children, researchers report.

Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is a spinal condition that causes weakness in the limbs, impairs motor function and can lead to lifelong disabilities. It was first reported in the United States in 2012, with outbreaks recurring every ...

THC From Pot Lingers in Breast Milk for Weeks: Study

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, remains in breast milk for up to six weeks and may be harmful to infants, a new study warns.

The researchers said the finding supports recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics and others that women shouldn't use marijuana while pregnant or breastfeeding.

"Just as we now caution mothers to avoid toba...

Breastfeeding Moms Get Mixed Messages When Baby Has an Allergy

Breastfeeding mothers whose babies have food allergies often get conflicting advice from doctors on whether they should change their eating habits, according to a new study.

"We found that guidance from health care practitioners for breastfeeding mothers in this situation was inconsistent," said study lead author Dr. Hannah Wangberg, an allergist-immunologist in San Diego.

"Of the 1...

New First Look at the Tiniest Babies' Lungs

Researchers who recorded the most detailed images ever made of newborns' lungs as they took their first breaths say the breakthrough could improve treatment of breathing problems in babies.

"Respiratory problems are the most common reason we need to treat babies in intensive care," said researcher David Tingay of Murdoch Children's Research Institute in Melbourne, Australia.

"This n...

Very Low COVID Transmission in Day Care Centers: Study

Children in day care centers had low coronavirus infection rates early in the pandemic, and are unlikely sources of COVID-19 transmission, a new study from France finds.

COVID-19 can infect people of all ages, but children tend to develop mild, if any, symptoms, and very rarely need to be hospitalized. Very young children's role as asymptomatic coronavirus spreaders remains unknown and th...

Omega-3s From Fish Might Curb Asthma in Kids, But Genes Matter

Consuming greater amounts of certain omega-3 fatty acids found in fish may reduce the risk of asthma in kids -- but only those with a common gene variant, British researchers say.

They focused on the long chain omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which are known to have anti-inflammatory properties.

"Asthma is the most common chronic cond...

Child Car Seat Safety Tip: Skip Puffy Winter Coats

Puffy coats have their place, but it's not inside a car seat.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers a variety of tips for keeping your little ones safe and warm while traveling by car.

The first is to avoid dressing children in puffy coats or snowsuits before buckling them in, because car seat straps won't tighten enough. That creates a danger that the fluffy padding will ...

Study Finds No Benefit From Supplemental Oxygen During Labor

For decades, women have commonly been given oxygen during childbirth, but a new research review finds little evidence it benefits newborns.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that women be given supplemental oxygen when fetal heart monitoring shows an abnormal heart rate. That's based on the possibility that oxygen deprivation is causing the problem.

...

Cataract Surgery in Infancy May Raise Glaucoma Risk in Childhood

Infants who have cataract removal surgery are at increased risk for sight-threatening glaucoma later in childhood, researchers say.

Glaucoma damages the optic nerve -- the connection between the eye and brain -- and can lead to vision loss.

Fewer than 2,500 infants are born with a cataract (clouding of the eye's lens) each year in the United States. Surgery is used to remove the aff...

Schools, Day Care Not a Big Factor in Kids Getting COVID: Study

As a rule, COVID-19 spreads rapidly in most groups, but new research suggests that schools and day care centers appear to be the exception.

Among those under 18, the virus is easily spread by close contact with family members who have COVID-19 and at gatherings where people don't wear masks, but going to school wasn't linked to positive COVID-19 tests, according to the researchers.

...

Parents, Don't Worry if Baby's Sleep Is Erratic

New parents can relax: Research suggests it's normal for infants' sleep patterns to vary widely.

"Although previous research has shown that infants start sleeping through the night at different stages of development, little is known about individual sleep patterns night after night," explained study leader Marie-Helene Pennestri. She's an assistant professor in the department of education...

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