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Results for search "Brain".

17 Sep

A Single Session Of Aerobic Exercise Can Make You Smarter

Researchers say even a two-minute workout may boost your brain power

Health News Results - 410

Doctors Divided Over Use of Controversial New Alzheimer's Drug

The controversial new Alzheimer's drug Aduhelm is creating something of a civil war in medicine, as health networks, hospitals, insurers and individual doctors weigh impending discussions with patients about whether they should take the medication.

Many doctors believe the U.S. Food and Drug Administration "moved the goalposts" to approve Aduhelm (aducanumab) in early June, and they aren'...

Drug Shows Promise in Easing Dementia-Linked Psychosis

FRIDAY, July 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A drug that eases hallucinations in people with Parkinson's disease may be able to do the same for those with dementia, a new clinical trial finds.

The medication, called Nuplazid (pimavanserin), is already approved in the United States for treating hallucinations and delusions related to Parkinson's.

The new study, publis...

Long-Term Outlook for Most With Serious Brain Injury Is Better Than Thought

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cripple patients for the rest of their lives, but new research suggests that many people with moderate-to-severe TBI have better-than-expected long-term outcomes.

The findings show that decisions about halting life-sustaining treatment for these patients should not be made in the first days after the injury, the researchers said.

"TBI is a life-cha...

Severe COVID in Kids: Rare, but Brain Issues Can Result

About one in 20 kids hospitalized with COVID-19 develop debilitating brain or nerve complications that could haunt some for a long time, a new British study reports.

Children with severe infections can suffer from brain inflammation, seizures, stroke, behavior changes, hallucinations and psychosis.

About one-third of the stricken kids had symptoms that didn't resolve in the short te...

Could Menopausal Hormone Therapy Reduce Women's Odds for Dementia?

Women on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for menopause go on to have a 58% lower risk of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative conditions, a new study finds.

Although the study wasn't designed to prove cause and effect, the findings could point the way to new treatments for such diseases, according to the researchers.

"This is not the first study on the impact of hormone...

Shock Therapy Safe, Effective for Tough-to-Treat Depression

MONDAY, July 19, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- "Shock" therapy often helps lift severe depression, but fear and stigma can deter patients from getting it. Now a large new study is confirming the treatment's safety.

Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), as it's medically known, has been around for decades. For almost as long, it's been seen in a bad light -- fueled by disturbing m...

Stroke Prevented His Speech, But Brain Implant Brought It Back

THURSDAY, July 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have developed an implant that allowed a man with severe paralysis to "speak" again by translating his brain signals into text.

The achievement is the latest step in "brain-computer interface" (BCI) research.

Scientists have been studying BCI technology for years, with the aim of one day giving people with pa...

Growing Up in Lead-Contaminated Area Might Alter Personality: Study

TUESDAY, July 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Can childhood lead exposure affect personality into adulthood?

Yes, a big multi-decade study suggests.

The finding stems from an analysis of data on atmospheric lead levels across the United States and 37 European nations since 1960. Lead levels were stacked up against responses to a personality survey of roughly 1.5 mill...

Pesticide Harmed Children's Brains: Lawsuits

Lawsuits claiming that the widely used bug killer chlorpyrifos caused brain damage in children were filed Monday in California.

Past research has shown that the pesticide harms the brains of fetuses and children, the Associated Press reported.

Chlorpyrifos is approved for use on more than 80 crops, but was banned for household use in 2001. The U.S. Environmental Pr...

Most Marriages Survive a Spouse's Brain Injury

Marriages can remain stable after something as challenging as a brain injury for one of the spouses, new research indicates.

Though past reports have suggested that divorce rates were high among those who experienced traumatic brain injury (TBI), that was not true for most people in the current study.

"Our data dispel myths about risk of divorce after TBI and suggest a message of ...

Scientists Track Spirituality in the Human Brain

Researchers have identified specific brain circuitry that is related to people's sense of spirituality — and it's centered in a brain region linked to pain inhibition, altruism and unconditional love.

The findings add to research seeking to understand the biological basis for human spirituality.

"It is something of a treacherous subject to navigate," said lead researcher Michael F...

New Insights Into How Eating Disorders Alter the Brain

Behaviors associated with eating disorders can make real changes to the brain, new research shows. The findings could help explain why these serious disorders are often chronic -- and may also point the way to new treatments.

Eating disorders — such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia and binge-eating disorder — can result in severe complications, including death. Related behaviors include ...

Most Cases of Dementia in U.S. Seniors Go Undiagnosed: Study

Most Americans with dementia are undiagnosed, which shows how important it is to screen and assess seniors for the disease, researchers say.

Their new analysis of data from a nationwide survey of about 6 million Americans aged 65 and older revealed that 91% of people with cognitive impairment consistent with dementia did not have a formal medical diagnosis of dementia or Alzheimer's disea...

Clot-Removing Procedure Can Sometimes Backfire for Stroke Patients

When someone suffers a stroke, doctors can often remove the culprit clot obstructing blood flow to the brain. Now, a new study sheds light on why those successful procedures do not always translate into a good outcome.

Researchers found that when clot retrieval takes more than one attempt, stroke patients are more likely to still have some degree of disability three months later.

An...

Mental Confusion an Early Warning Sign of Severe COVID-19

COVID-19 patients with mental confusion are at increased risk for a severe form of the illness, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed the electronic health records of more than 36,000 COVID-19 patients at five Florida hospitals. Of those, 12% developed severe COVID-19.

Patients with mental confusion were three times more likely to develop severe illness than those without such sym...

People Over 80 Benefit From Surgery for Benign Brain Tumors

Surgery for the most common type of benign brain tumor should be considered for patients 80 and older, Finnish researchers say.

Meningiomas originate in the meninges surrounding the brain, and the primary treatment is surgery. But the risks of operating increase with age, so surgery for meningioma patients who are 80 and older is rare in most countries, according to University of Helsinki...

Body's 'Signals' May Feel Different in People With Anorexia, Depression

The brain interprets physical signals differently in people with depression, anorexia and some other mental health disorders, new research shows.

British scientists examined "interoception" -- the brain's ability to sense internal conditions in the body -- in 626 patients with mental health disorders and a control group of 610 people without mental illness.

"Interoception is somethi...

Leaded Gas, Banned Decades Ago, Might Still Harm People Today

The good news: Levels of lead in the air that Londoners breathe are far lower today than they were in the 1980s, when leaded gas was an automotive staple.

The bad news: Decades-old lead particles still pollute the city's air, a stubborn and potentially hazardous leftover of a now banned product. The findings might have implications for the health of city dwellers globally.

In the ...

Marijuana Use Tied to Higher Odds for Thoughts of Suicide

Young adults who use marijuana appear to have an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and attempted suicide, according to a new study from the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

In fact, the risk that someone between 18 and 34 will think about, plan for or attempt suicide increases with the amount of marijuana they use, according to results published June 22 in the journal J...

Autopsy Study Shows How COVID Harms the Brain

The brains of people who died from COVID-19 were remarkably similar to the brains of people who die from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, showing inflammation and disrupted circuitry, researchers report.

"The brains of patients who died from severe COVID-19 showed profound molecular markers of inflammation, even though those patients didn't have any reporte...

When Is Your Very Earliest Memory?

Your earliest memories may stretch back to a younger age than previously thought, new research suggests.

The study found that people can recall back to an average age of 2½ years old, which is a year earlier than suggested by previous studies.

The findings from the 21-year study were recently published online in the journal Memory.

"When one's earliest memory occurs,...

'MIND' Diet Can Help Preserve Brain in People With MS

FRIDAY, June 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) – A diet designed to boost brain health appears to benefit people with multiple sclerosis (MS), new research suggests.

For the study, a team from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City examined 185 people diagnosed with MS within the past five years. Each had MRI brain scans and responded to detailed questionnaires.

The upsh...

Could Fish Oil Supplements Help Fight Depression?

Fish oil supplements are often touted as good for your heart health, but a new study finds they may also help fight depression.

"Using a combination of laboratory and patient research, our study has provided exciting new insight into how omega-3 fatty acids bring about anti-inflammatory effects that improve depression," said lead author Alessandra Borsini, a postdoctoral neuroscientist at...

Pot Use May Change the Teenage Brain, MRIs Show

Smoking pot appears to affect teens' brain development, altering it in ways that could diminish their reasoning, decision-making and memory skills as they age, a new study reports.

Brain scans of about 800 teenagers found that those who started smoking pot tended to have increased thinning of the cerebral cortex -- the outer layer of the brain responsible for thought, perception and langu...

Could a Type of Statin Raise Dementia Risks?

Certain cholesterol-lowering drugs might speed dementia in some older adults whose memories are starting to fail, a small, preliminary study suggests.

The researchers found that of 300 older adults with mildly impaired thinking and memory, those using "lipophilic" statins were more likely to develop dementia over the next eight years.

Lipophilic statins include such widely used medi...

Why Music at Bedtime Might Not Be a Great Idea

That music at bedtime that's supposed to help you fall asleep may actually have the opposite effect, new research suggests.

It turns out that "earworms," those catchy bits of a composition that can get stuck in a person's head can also interject themselves into a person's dreams, affecting the ability to fall asleep and to sleep well.

"Our brains continue to process music even when...

Poor Sleep After Head Injury Could Point to Dementia Risk

Sleep disorders may increase the odds for dementia in survivors of traumatic brain injury, new research suggests.

The study included nearly 713,000 patients who were free of dementia when they were treated for traumatic brain injury (TBI) between 2003 and 2013. The severity of their brain injuries varied, and nearly six in 10 were men. Their median age was 44, meaning half were older, hal...

Girl's Tragedy Has Parents Calling for Changes to Car Design

Jay-Fay Fraser was in the back seat of her father's sedan, heading home from feeding the homeless on Thanksgiving 2016, when another car rear-ended them on the highway.

The driver's seat collapsed backward from the sudden force of the rear impact, slamming into Jay-Fay's head, her mother, Michelle Fraser, recounted.

"She lurched forward, the seat collapsed backward, and it basically...

Deep Brain Stimulation Therapy May Help Parkinson's Patients Long Term

Parkinson's disease patients can get symptom relief with deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy that lasts over the long term, a new study shows.

Over 15 years, patients who received DBS, which requires surgical implantation, had significant improvement in motor symptoms and less need for medication, researchers found.

"Our study, for the first time, supports the efficacy of deep brai...

Amazon Tribe Could Hold Key to Health of Aging Brains

A native South American population that lives a pre-industrial lifestyle may have a slower rate of brain aging than the typical Westerner, a new study finds.

The study focused on the Tsimane population, whose roughly 16,000 members dwell in a remote part of the Bolivian Amazon. They live by farming, hunting, gathering and fishing - a lifestyle devoid of processed food, couch time and stre...

'Brain Fog' Can Linger With Long-Haul COVID

MONDAY, May 24, 2021 (HealthDay News) - As researchers work to learn more about COVID-19 and so-called long-haulers, a new study suggests "brain fog" can persist and even worsen for those who were infected months before.

Long-haulers continue to have symptoms long after their COVID diagnosis, and these symptoms can be mental as well as physical.

"People have trouble problem-solving,...

Why Don't People Have Memories of Their Infancy?

New insight into why you don't remember your earliest years of life is provided in a new study.

"A fundamental mystery about human nature is that we remember almost nothing from birth through early childhood, yet we learn so much critical information during that time -- our first language, how to walk, objects and foods, and social bonds," said senior author Nick Turk-Browne, a professor ...

Gluten Doesn't Trigger 'Brain Fog' for Women Without Celiac Disease: Study

Going gluten-free is a trend that touts benefits for the mind and body, but a new study finds no evidence that gluten is bad for your brain.

Among nearly 13,500 middle-aged women, researchers found no connection between eating wheat, barley or rye (the sources of gluten) and mental ability.

According to the study authors, the only folks who benefit mentally from avoiding gluten are...

Too Much TV May Dull the Aging Brain

Mom always said too much TV would rot your brain, and as with so many other things it appears she was right.

Middle-aged folks who regularly turn to TV for entertainment appear to have a greater risk of decline in their reasoning and memory later in life, three new studies suggest.

Researchers found that even moderate amounts of TV viewing were associated with worse performance on c...

Robotics Can Give People 3rd Thumb, But How Will Brain React?

If you've ever wished you had an extra hand to accomplish a task, never fear, scientists are working on that. But a new study raises questions about how such technology could affect your brain.

The findings come from ongoing research into a 3D-printed robotic thumb known as "Third Thumb." It's worn on a person's dominant hand, making it capable of feats that normally demand both hands.

A Healthier Heart Might Make You Smarter

In new evidence that illustrates that health issues rarely exist in a vacuum, a new study finds a link between heart health and brain function.

Existing evidence suggests that having heart disease raises one's risk of dementia, and vice versa, but a team of researchers based in London wanted to find out if this connection could be seen in a healthier population.

For the study, nearl...

'Mind-Reading' Technology Allows Paralyzed Man to Rapidly Text

A microchip implanted in the brain has allowed a paralyzed man to communicate by text -- at speeds that approach the typical smartphone user.

The achievement is the latest advance in "brain-computer interface" (BCI) systems.

Scientists have been studying BCI technology for years, with the aim of one day giving people with paralysis or limb amputations greater independence in their ...

Do Prescription Sleep Medicines Even Work?

An estimated 9 million Americans turn to prescription pills when they can't sleep, but a new study of middle-aged women finds taking the drugs for a year or longer may do little good.

Comparing a group of about 200 women who were medicated for sleep problems with over 400 women who had sleeping problems but did not take medication, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston f...

New Insights Into Treating Mild Head Injuries

It may be possible to treat the thinking problems that result from repeated hits to the head, a new laboratory study suggests.

The new experiments with mice are the first to offer a molecular analysis of what happens in the brain after repetitive but mild blows to the head, said researcher Mark Burns. He is head of the Laboratory for Brain Injury and Dementia at Georgetown University, in ...

Most Severe COVID Cases Involve Neuro Issues, and They're More Often Fatal

Neurological problems are occurring in a very high percentage of hospitalized COVID-19 patients -- and what's worse, those symptoms foretell a bad end for many sufferers, a new study finds.

About four out of five people sick enough to be hospitalized for COVID-19 suffer some sort of neurological problem, ranging from headache and a loss of sense of smell to confusion, delirium, stroke a...

Road to Healthy Middle-Aged Brain May Begin in Childhood

Could having heart disease risk factors in childhood sow the seeds of thinking declines in middle-age?

It looks like it might, new research claims.

"I think it was not so big of a surprise for us, but maybe for the scientific community who have been focusing mainly on the midlife risk factors and old-age cognition," said study co-author Suvi Rovio. She is senior researcher of cardio...

Why Sleep Raises Risk for Sudden Death in People With Epilepsy

New research gives insight into why people with epilepsy are at increased risk of sudden death during sleep.

The study found that both sleep and epileptic seizures work together to slow heart rate, and that seizures also disrupt the body's natural regulation of sleep-related changes.

These factors can sometimes lead to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), which caused the 20...

Failing Kidneys Could Bring Higher Dementia Risk

Chronic kidney disease may carry an increased risk of dementia, according to a Swedish study.

In people with chronic kidney disease, the bean-shaped organs gradually lose their ability to filter waste from the blood and eliminate fluids.

"Even a mild reduction in kidney function has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and infections, and there is growing evide...

How a Little Alcohol Might Help the Heart

A bit of booze may help protect your heart by reducing stress-related brain activity, a new study suggests.

"The thought is that moderate amounts of alcohol may have effects on the brain that can help you relax, reduce stress levels and, perhaps through these mechanisms, lower the incidence of cardiovascular disease," said lead author Dr. Kenechukwu Mezue, a nuclear cardiology fellow at M...

1 in 4 U.S. Teens Has Had a Concussion: Study

Nearly one in four American teens has suffered at least one concussion, according to new research.

And though more teens are self-reporting sports-related concussions, visits to the emergency room for these traumatic head injuries fell between 2012 and 2018.

"One reason that could explain why adolescents who participate in sports saw an increase in self-reported concussion could be ...

'Ghosts and Guardian Angels': New Insights Into Parkinson's Hallucinations

Parkinson's disease is widely seen as a movement disorder, but it can cause an array of symptoms, including hallucinations. Now a new study has shed light on what is happening in the brain during those disturbances.

The study focused on Parkinson's patients who have so-called presence hallucinations -- a false feeling that another person is nearby.

Researchers found that they were a...

Breathing Dirty Air Could Raise a Child's Risk for Adult Mental Illness

Kids exposed to air pollution may be at risk for mental illness in early adulthood, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that young adults in Britain who were exposed to higher levels of traffic-related air pollutants during their childhood and teen years were prone to develop symptoms of mental illness later. Nitrogen oxides were a particular problem, the study authors reported.

Higher Education Won't Help Preserve the Aging Brain: Study

That college degree may be useful in many ways, but new research suggests it probably won't keep your brain from shrinking with age.

Over the years, a number of studies have suggested that education might buffer people against age-related declines in memory and thinking. But those findings did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

In the new study, researchers asked whether peo...

Head Injury, Alzheimer's Appear to Affect Brain in Similar Ways

Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injury appear to affect the brain in similar ways, according to a study that may point to new ways to identify people at high risk for Alzheimer's.

"These findings are the first to suggest that cognitive impairment following a traumatic brain injury is useful for predicting the magnitude of Alzheimer's-like brain degradation," said study author Andr...

Lullaby Effect: Music Can Speed Your Way to Sleep, Study Finds

Music hath charms to soothe you off to slumber, new research suggests.

The study found that calming tunes at bedtime seem to help older people struggling with insomnia.

"We found music therapy was effective for older adults with sleep disturbance," said study co-author Yen-Chin Chen, an associate professor of nursing at National Cheng Kung University in Tainan, Taiwan.

That's ...

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