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Results for search "Dementia".

Health News Results - 234

Risk Factors for Dementia May Change With Age

Dementia risk factors appear to shift with age, and experts say knowing that could help people make lifestyle changes to reduce their chances of developing the disease.

"Dementia is a complicated disease and risk prediction scores need to b...

Major Head Trauma May Up Risks for Dementia

People who've had a major traumatic brain injury (TBI) may be at increased risk for dementia, according to a new study.

"Approximately 1 in 10 people in our study who had major TBI did develop dementia," said study co-author Dr. Rahul Raj, ...

Adding These Foods to Your Diet Could Keep Dementia Away

A diet rich in the antioxidants that leafy, green vegetables and colorful fruit deliver is good for your body, and now new research shows it also protects your brain.

In the study, people whose blood contained the highest amounts of three key antioxidants were less likely to develop all-cause dementia than those whose...

Heart Risk Factors Can Be Recipe for Dementia

The faster you pile up heart disease risk factors, the greater your odds of developing dementia, a new study suggests.

Previous research has linked heart health threats such as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity with mental decline and dementia.

Amassing those risk factors at a faster pace boosts your risk for

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 25, 2022
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  • Former College Football Players Suffer More Brain Disorders as They Age

    College football players live longer than those who didn't play, but they suffer more brain-related issues as they age, a new study finds.

    Among former Notre Dame football players, being physically fit was tied to lower deaths from heart disease and diabetes. But the former players were five times more likely to have impaired thinking and memory ("cognition") and 2.5 times more likely to ...

    Race Plays Huge Role in Dementia Risk

    Black, Hispanic and Asian Americans have an increased risk of being diagnosed with dementia as they age -- for reasons that are not entirely understood, a large new study finds.

    The study, of nearly 1.9 million older U.S. veterans, found that compared with their white counterparts, Black vets were 54% more likely to be diagnosed with dementia over a decade. That risk was nearly doubled am...

    How Does Exercise Guard Against Dementia? Study Reveals Clues

    Exercise may help safeguard your brain as you age, and a new study suggests how this might happen.

    Previous research has shown that physical activity helps protect brain cells. This paper indicates it may do that through lower levels of insulin and body fat.

    "These results may help us to understand how physical activity affects brain health, which may guide us in developing strategi...

    Live Healthy, Live Longer Without Dementia

    Staving off Alzheimer's disease might just take a healthy diet, exercise and an active mind, a new study suggests.

    Women and men who follow a healthy lifestyle live longer — and longer without Alzheimer's or other dementias, researchers say.

    "Eating a

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 14, 2022
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  • New Insights Into Why Alzheimer's Can Bring Drowsiness

    Alzheimer’s patients are often drowsy during the day, but it might not be because of poor sleep at night.

    Instead, a clinical trial that monitored patients' sleep and then studied their brains after death discovered an entirely different reason for such sleepiness -- they suffer a loss of neurons ...

    Half of Americans Now Die With Dementia Diagnosis, Better Record-Keeping May Be Why

    A record number of American adults are now dying with a dementia diagnosis, new research shows.

    Yet, that increase of 36% from two decades ago may have more to do with better record-keeping than an actual rise in dementia cases, the study authors said.

    About half of all older adults are diagnosed with de...

    Early Promise From Experimental Drug to Treat Alzheimer's

    Researchers are working on a pill that might safely help people with early Alzheimer’s disease improve their thinking and memory skills and possibly even live independently longer.

    The new study was only designed to gather data on the experimental drug's safety, but when 26 patients with mild to m...

    Bruce Willis Stepping Down From Acting After Brain Disorder Diagnosis

    "Die Hard" star Bruce Willis is stepping away from acting following a recent diagnosis of aphasia, a disorder affecting the part of the brain responsible for language.

    Willis' ex-wife Demi Moore, current wife Emma Heming Willis and daughters announced his decision in an Instagram post Wednesday, noting that "he has bee...

    Mental Decline Can Follow a Heart Attack

    As if recovering from a heart attack wasn't hard enough, new research shows many patients may suffer severe thinking declines.

    Researchers in Poland found that in the six months after a

  • Consumer news
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  • March 25, 2022
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  • Lots of Napping Could Raise a Senior's Odds for Alzheimer's

    Taking longer or more frequent naps during the day may sound enticing, but it may be a harbinger of Alzheimer's disease.

    Older adults who nap throughout the day may be more likely to develop Alzheimer's, while napping may also be a consequence of advancing Alzheimer's, a new study suggests.

    "D...

    Is It 'Pre-Alzheimer's' or Normal Aging? Poll Finds Many Americans Unclear

    You regularly can't remember where you left your phone or your book. You keep missing appointments. You often lose your train of thought during conversation.

    Many older folks shrug off these instances as so-called "senior moments" -- but experts say this isn't typically part of normal aging.

    Instead, these are signs of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a stage that exists between the...

    More Evidence That Exercise Protects the Aging Brain

    Just a bit of exercise can help keep your brain in shape as you age, according to the latest study that shows how physical activity can benefit older minds.

    "This finding isn't saying, 'If you're older, you need to go out there and start running marathons,'" said lead author Marissa Gogniat, a recent doctoral graduate in psychology from the University of Georgia.

    "This is saying if ...

    More Evidence That Education May Protect Against Dementia

    Not everyone who becomes forgetful as they age develops dementia, and a new study suggests that those with college degrees and advanced language skills are likely to get better.

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an early stage of memory loss marked by lapses in memory and thi...

    Even a Little Drinking Ages the Brain: Study

    There is no amount of alcohol that is good for your brain.

    So claims a new study that found even light to moderate drinking can age the brain faster than normal.

    Previous research has shown that heavy drinkers have changes in brain structure and size that are associated with thinking and <...

    More Years Playing Hockey, Higher Odds for CTE Linked to Head Injury

    Researchers already know that repeated hits to the head on the football field are linked to a degenerative brain disease, as seen in a number of retired NFL stars. Now, experts have turned their attention to ice hockey, another high-contact sport.

    When studying whether the hits, year after year, can also be linked to

    Early Menopause May Raise a Woman's Odds for Dementia

    Women who enter menopause early may be more likely to develop dementia later in life, new research indicates.

    During menopause, production of the female sex hormone estrogen drops dramatically and a woman's periods come to an end. While women typically enter menopause in their early 50s, many do so earlier — eit...

    Staying Fit May Keep Alzheimer's at Bay

    If there was something you could do to ward off Alzheimer's disease, would you do it?

    If so, a new study has a suggestion: Get moving.

    Participants who were most physically fit were 33% less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than the least fit, the researchers found. And those whose fitn...

    Four-Legged Friends Could Be Friend to Your Brain

    Add better brain health to the growing list of protections your beloved pet may provide you: New research suggests that older adults with a furry companion showed slower mental declines than those without one.

    "Prior studies have suggested that the human-animal bond may have health benefits like decreasing

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  • February 24, 2022
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  • Getting Active Can Keep Those 'Senior Moments' at Bay

    Want to preserve all those precious memories, including your first kiss and how you felt the first time you got behind the wheel of a car?

    If you do, start moving: New research shows that when sedentary older adults started to exercise, they showed improvements in episodic memory, or the ability to vividly recall meaningful moments and events.

    These benefits were most pronounced amo...

    Human Brain Doesn't Slow Down Until After 60

    You used to be able to make snap judgments in your 20s, but now it feels like you take a lot longer to react to questions, decisions and challenges put before you.

    Don't fret, it's not that you're losing brain power.

    Your response time does tend to slow down as you age, but a new study argues that's not because your brain's processing speed is deteriorating.

    Your brain remains...

    Brain's Decline Accelerates in Years After Heart Attack

    Your heart and brain may often seem at odds, but they have more in common than you think. A new study shows that a heart attack can lead to faster mental decline over the years.

    "We need to realize that what's going on in the heart and brain ar...

    Keeping Weight Stable Could Help Save Your Brain

    Older adults who maintain a steady weight as they age are less likely to experience rapid cognitive decline, regardless of how much they weigh to start, new research suggests.

    “There’s something about maintaining weight and BMI that seems to reflect some health resilience,” said study author Michal Schnaider Beeri, a professor of psychiatry at Icahn Mount Sinai in New York City. (BMI is...

    Cleaner Air Could Mean Healthier Brains for Older Women

    Everyone knows cleaner air means healthier bodies, but new research suggests it might also help aging minds.

    "Our study is important because it is one of the first to show that reducing air pollution over time may benefit the brain health of older women by decreasing their likelihood of developing dementia," said...

    Scientists Work Out How Exercise Saves Your Brain

    Exercise helps you stay fit, hale and hearty, and researchers say it may also help you stave off dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Now they have a better understanding of the hidden benefits that aid the brain.

    Older folks who are more physically active have higher levels of a protein that promotes better communication between the brain's synapses, a new study reports.

    "Synapses are...

    Make 2022 Your Year for a Free Memory Screening

    When it comes to routine health screenings, resolve to include a memory assessment in 2022.

    The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America offers routine screenings that are both virtual and free every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

    The process is quick, taking about 10 to 15 minutes. It includes a series of questions meant to gauge memory, language, thinking skills and other intellectual ...

    More U.S. Seniors, Especially Women, Are Retaining Healthy Brains: Study

    The percentage of older Americans reporting serious problems with memory and thinking has declined in recent years -- and higher education levels may be part of the reason, a new study finds.

    Researchers found that between 2008 and 2017, the proportion of older U.S. adults reporting...

    Toxins in Wildfire Smoke May Make Their Way Into Brain

    The smoke from wildfires is dangerous for your lungs, but tiny particles from the smoke can also enter your brain and cause lifelong neurological issues, a new animal study suggests.

    Once that happens, the particles may put people at risk for everything from premature aging and various forms of dementia to depression and even psychosis, researchers say.

    "These are fires that are com...

    Cataract Surgery Might Lower Your Odds for Dementia

    People who undergo surgery to treat cataracts may have a lower likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

    Of more than 3,000 older adults with the eye disease, those who had surgery were about 30% less likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's in the coming years, researchers found.

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 7, 2021
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  • Could Viagra Help Prevent Alzheimer's?

    Viagra, a drug long used to treat erectile dysfunction, may double as a potential weapon against Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

    Looking at data on more than 7 million Americans, researchers found that those taking the drug were 69% less likely to develop Alzheimer's, when compared to non-users.

    Then, in lab experiments, the investigators showed that the medication seeme...

    High Heart Rate Linked to Dementia Risk

    Checking older adults' resting heart rate could help identify those who are more likely to experience a decline in mental function, a Swedish study suggests.

    The researchers found that a high resting heart rate was associated with a greater risk of dementia.

    "We believe it would be valuable to explore if resting heart rate could identify patients with high dementia risk," said lead ...

    Lifetime Spent With Epilepsy Ages the Brain, Study Finds

    People with a longtime history of epilepsy show signs of rapid brain aging that may raise their odds for developing dementia down the road.

    This is the key finding of new research reporting that the brains of people with epilepsy that began in childhood appear to be about 10 years older than the brains of people without a history of this seizure disorder.

    Individuals with epilepsy w...

    Clearing Out Clutter Might Not Help People With Dementia

    You might think de-cluttering would make it easier for people with dementia to do daily tasks. Not so, says a new study from the United Kingdom.

    "It is generally assumed that a person with dementia will be better able to carry out daily tasks when their home space is tidy and clutter-free," said Eneida Mioshi, a professor in the School of Health Sciences at University of East Anglia (UEA)...

    'Mild Cognitive Impairment' in Older Age Often Disappears, Study Finds

    A diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) might worry an older adult, who could see it as a stepping stone to dementia. But a new study suggests one does not necessarily lead to the other.

    In fact, nearly half of seniors tracked in the study -- all of who had been diagnosed with issues in memory and thinking and received an MCI diagnosis -- no longer had the condition a few years lat...

    Could Coffee Help Lower Your Odds for Alzheimer's?

    Coffee lovers know a steaming cup of java can quickly deliver energy and mental clarity every morning, but new research suggests it may also guard against Alzheimer's disease in the long run.

    "Worldwide, a high proportion of adults drink coffee every day, making it one of the most popular beverages consumed," said lead researcher Samantha Gardener, a post-doctoral research fellow at Edith...

    More Years Playing Football, More Brain Lesions on MRI: Study

    Repetitive head hits are common in football, and they're also linked to debilitating brain injuries.

    But rendering a definitive diagnosis typically means waiting for autopsy results after the player has died.

    Now, a new study suggests that brain scans can reliably spot troubling signs of sports-inflicted neurological damage while a person is still alive.

    The research also show...

    Low-Dose Aspirin Won't Affect Dementia Risk in People With Diabetes

    Low-dose aspirin neither reduces nor increases the risk of dementia in adults with type 2 diabetes, a new study finds.

    "This is reassuring that an increase in the risk of dementia is unlikely for the millions of people worldwide who regularly take aspirin to protect against the risk of heart attack and stroke," according to study author Jane Armitage, of the University of Oxford in Englan...

    Reminder Apps on Smartphones May Help in Early Dementia

    Despite stereotypes about seniors and technology, a small study suggests that older adults in the early stages of dementia can use smartphone apps as memory aids.

    The researchers found that older people with mild impairments in memory and thinking were not only able to learn how to use the apps, they said the digital aids made their daily lives easier.

    The apps were not specially de...

    Could Coffee or Tea Lower Your Odds for Dementia and Stroke?

    A few cups of your favorite brew -- coffee or tea -- each day might help keep stroke and dementia at bay, a large new study suggests.

    For close to 14 years, scientists stacked up coffee and tea consumption against the risk of stroke and dementia among nearly 366,000 healthy Brits between 50 and 74 years of age.

    The researchers -- led by Yuan Zhang of Tianjin Medical University in Ti...

    Alzheimer's Diagnosis May Come With Big Cost to Social Life

    Alzheimer's is a devastating disease, slowly robbing patients of their memories and even their sense of selves.

    Now, new research shows it also robs sufferers of a healthy social life.

    "Social relationships are an essential feature of our quality of life and can buffer against cognitive decline," said study co-author Addam Reynolds, a doctoral candidate at the Rutgers School of Soci...

    Many People May Be Eating Their Way to Dementia

    Eating lots of fruits, veggies, beans and other foods with inflammation-cooling properties may lower your odds of developing dementia as you age.

    But, if your diet is loaded with pro-inflammatory foods, you may be up to three times more likely to experience memory loss and issues with language, problem-solving and other thinking skills as you age, new research suggests.

    "A less infl...

    Could Estrogen Help Shield Women's Brains From Alzheimer's?

    A key to reduced Alzheimer's disease risk in women could be how much of the hormone estrogen they're able to stockpile over the years, new research suggests.

    Certain lifetime choices -- such as having more children, taking hormonal birth control or taking hormone therapy during menopause -- mean that a woman has greater cumulative exposure to estrogen during her lifetime. A longer nu...

    Fish on Your Plate May Keep Your Brain Sharp

    Older folks who eat fish a couple of times a week may be doing their brains a favor.

    New research suggests that fish, even in moderate amounts, helps stave off vascular disease that may ultimately lead to dementia.

    "Previous studies, including work from our team in France and others in the U.S., reported protective associations of eating fish against cognitive decline and risk of de...

    Purrfect Pal: Robotic Cats May Help People With Dementia

    If you have a pet, you know that the excited wag of your dog's tail or the satisfied purr of your cat curling up on your lap can be a mood booster.

    But what if that pet is a robot? And what if its owner has dementia?

    In a small study, researchers at Florida Atlantic University found that engaging with a robotic pet might help people with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia, re...

    Could Breastfeeding Help Women Keep Their Smarts as They Age?

    Might breastfeeding affect a new mother's future brain health?

    That's the intriguing question posed by a new study that flips the narrative from the often-touted benefits for baby to what impact breastfeeding might hold for Mom years later.

    Researchers from UCLA Health found that women over age 50 who had breastfed their babies performed better on tests of brain function than those ...

    Right Amount of Sleep May Be Important in Early Alzheimer's

    Getting the right amount of sleep -- not too much and not too little -- could reduce your risk of mental decline as you age, even if you have early Alzheimer's disease, a new study claims.

    Poor sleep and Alzheimer's disease are both associated with thinking ("cognitive") declines, but separating out the effects of each has been a challenge.

    This new study included 100 older adults w...

    How 1.3 Million Americans Became Controlled by Conservatorships

    Pop singer Britney Spears was at the height of her fame in 2008 when, through a series of arcane legal maneuverings, her father gained conservatorship over her and took control of her personal and financial affairs.

    Spears' plight and the #FreeBritney movement has shone a bright spotlight on America's guardianship system, which experts say is shrouded in secrecy, ripe for abuse and in des...

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