COVID 19 VACCINE NOW AVAILABLE - PLEASE CALL US AT 304-789-2200 TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT!
COVID VACCINE REGISTRATION FORM
COVID VACCINE FACT SHEET

Download our NEW mobile app!!! Quickly request refills or login and manage your prescriptions on the go!
Available on both iTunes and Android.

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Inflammation".

Health News Results - 141

Unlucky in Love? It Can Damage Men's Health, Study Finds

Men who are broken-hearted or just unlucky in love could be more likely to have health-damaging inflammation, new research suggests.

Serious breakups and solo living for many years may increase the risk of ill health and death — but apparently only for men, according to the researchers behind a new Danish study.

"Small numbers of breakups or years lived alone is not in itself a r...

When Gums Aren't Healthy, Mind and Body May Follow

Gum disease isn't just a threat to your teeth. It also increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, mental woes and more, British researchers report.

"The study reinforces the importance of prevention, early identification and treatment of periodontal disease, and the need for members of th...

More Evidence Heart Risk From COVID Vaccine Is Very Low

There's a very low risk of heart inflammation after getting the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, according to a new study that adds to previous research supporting the safety of the shots.

The two mRNA vaccines had been linked in some studies with an increased risk of

Animal Study Suggests Link Between Obesity and Gum Disease

It is likely a connection few have considered, but new research in mice suggests that obesity may up your risk of gum disease.

Specifically, chronic inflammation caused by obesity may trigger the development of cells called osteoclasts that break down bone tissue — including alveolar bone that holds teeth in place.

“Although there is a clear relationship between the degree of ob...

New Asthma Drug Helps Kids, But Price Tag Is High

Children with hard-to-control asthma may get relief from adding an injectable antibody drug to their standard treatment, a clinical trial has found.

The drug, called dupilumab (Dupixent), has been available for several years to treat stubborn asthma in adults and teenagers. Based on the new findings, the

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • December 9, 2021
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Stool Samples From the 1980s Hold Clues to Fighting HIV Today

    What do all the microbes living rent-free in your gut have to do with disease risk? Perhaps a lot.

    A groundbreaking analysis of decades-old stool and blood samples from the early AIDS epidemic suggests that men who had high levels of inflammation-causing bacteria in their intestin...

    Young People Recover Quickly From Rare Heart Side Effect of COVID Vaccine

    It happens very rarely, but most teens and young adults who do experience heart inflammation (myocarditis) after a COVID-19 shot have mild symptoms and recover quickly, new research shows.

    “Overwhelmingly, data continue to indicate that the benefits of COVID-19 vaccinat...

    Gene Found in Amish Helps Protect Their Hearts

    A rare gene variant discovered among Amish people may help lower "bad" cholesterol and protect against heart disease, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among nearly 7,000 Amish people, the gene variant was tied to reductions in both LDL cholesterol and fibrinogen -- a protein that is a marker of inflammation and linked to heart disease risk.

    There was also evidence of pro...

    Vaping Can Trigger Gene Changes in Cells: Study

    For those who think vaping is safer than smoking, think again.

    A new study warns that vaping triggers the same gene regulation changes that smoking does, so it may raise the risk of cancer and other serious diseases.

    "Our study, for the first time, investigates the biological effects of vaping in adult e-cigarette users, while simultaneously accounting for their past smoking exposur...

    COVID May Trigger Heart Condition in Young Athletes

    A heart condition, myocarditis, has been found in a number of U.S. college athletes who have had COVID-19, a new study finds.

    Myocarditis has also been linked in some young people to the COVID vaccine. But the odds are far greater that this inflammation of the heart muscle will occur in those who get COVID infection itself, experts said.

    "We're still learning about how the vir...

    Give Others Help, Get Back Health Benefits: Study

    When it comes to helping others and your health, it might be better to give than to receive, a new study suggests.

    Researchers surveyed more than 1,000 Americans between 34 and 84 about their social involvement and how much they thought they could rely on their family, friends or a spouse if they needed help.

    On a key measure of health -- chronic inflammation -- positive social rela...

    Drug Long Used for Alcoholism Might Fight Severe COVID-19

    A widely available drug used to treat alcoholism has potential as a COVID-19 treatment, researchers say.

    The investigators found that people taking disulfiram (Antabuse) for alcoholism had a lower risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2 and were less likely to die from COVID-19 if infected than those not taking the drug.

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • November 23, 2021
  • |
  • Full Page
  • People on Immune-Suppressing Meds Fare Equally Well With Severe COVID

    Hospitalized COVID-19 patients who take medications that suppress the immune system don't have a higher risk of severe COVID-19 than those with normal immune systems, a new study finds.

    Early in the pandemic, it was feared that people taking immunosuppressive drugs were at increased risk of severe COVID-19 due to their weakened immune systems. The drugs are used to treat cancer and autoim...

    Could Coffee or Tea Lower Your Odds for Dementia and Stroke?

    A few cups of your favorite brew -- coffee or tea -- each day might help keep stroke and dementia at bay, a large new study suggests.

    For close to 14 years, scientists stacked up coffee and tea consumption against the risk of stroke and dementia among nearly 366,000 healthy Brits between 50 and 74 years of age.

    The researchers -- led by Yuan Zhang of Tianjin Medical University in Ti...

    Cases of Children's Severe COVID-Linked Illness Were Worse in Second Wave

    A rare inflammatory condition associated with COVID-19 in children was more severe in the second wave of patients than in the first, researchers report.

    For the study, investigators examined the cases of 106 patients with multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) who arrived in two waves at Children's National Hospital in Washington, D.C.

    In the first wave, patients were...

    Certain Antidepressants Appear to Curb Severe COVID-19

    Certain commonly prescribed antidepressants appear to substantially lower the risk of dying among seriously ill COVID-19 patients, a large new study indicates.

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are among the most widely prescribed drugs for the treatment of depression. They include drugs like Lexapro (escitalopram), Paxil (paroxetine) and Zoloft (sertraline).

    "We saw t...

    Exercise Helps Ease Arm, Shoulder Pain After Breast Cancer Surgery

    Arm and shoulder pain are common for women after breast cancer surgery, and beginning a supervised exercise program soon afterwards can go a long way to easing the discomfort, new research suggests.

    As the team of British investigators explained, restricted shoulder movement and chronic pain or swelling in the armpit area can really impact a patient's recovery and quality of life.

    ...

    Many People May Be Eating Their Way to Dementia

    Eating lots of fruits, veggies, beans and other foods with inflammation-cooling properties may lower your odds of developing dementia as you age.

    But, if your diet is loaded with pro-inflammatory foods, you may be up to three times more likely to experience memory loss and issues with language, problem-solving and other thinking skills as you age, new research suggests.

    "A less infl...

    COVID Variant Tied to Heart Inflammation in Cats, Dogs

    At a veterinary clinic in the United Kingdom, the staff noticed a sudden and atypical increase in cats and dogs who were experiencing myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle.

    Was it a coincidence that these animals were showing up severely ill from a condition that has been linked to COVID-19 just as the highly contagious Alpha variant was circulating?

    Apparently not.

    Zinc Might Help Shorten Your Cold or Flu, Study Finds

    Many people pop a zinc supplement at the first sign of a cold, and there's new evidence supporting the habit.

    Australian researchers found that the supplements appear to help shorten respiratory tract infections, such as colds, flu, sinusitis and pneumonia.

    Many over-the-counter cold and cough remedies offer only "marginal benefits," the researchers noted, making "zinc a viable 'na...

    Cheap Antidepressant Might Help Keep COVID Patients Out of Hospital

    A cheap and widely available antidepressant drug called fluvoxamine may reduce COVID-19 patients' risk of serious illness requiring hospitalization, according to a new study.

    The trial included almost 1,500 unvaccinated outpatients in Brazil. All of the patients tested positive for infection with SARS-CoV-2 and were deemed to be at high risk for a severe case of illness.

    Fluvoxamine...

    Tingling, Burning in Your Feet? Common Condition May Be the Cause

    The number of people experiencing numbness, pins and needles, and burning pain in their feet and toes seems to be on the rise, new research suggests, and some of these folks may be at increased risk for heart trouble.

    Exactly why there has been an uptick in "small fiber neuropathy" is not fully understood yet, but it could be due to the ongoing diabetes and obesity epidemic as both condit...

    Could Traffic Noise Raise Your Odds for Dementia?

    It's more than just an annoyance: Long-term exposure to traffic and train noise may increase the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, Danish researchers report.

    The study authors said that more than 1,200 of Denmark's nearly 8,500 cases of dementia in 2017 may have resulted from exposure to noise, which means that reducing traffic noise might help prevent the thinking, memory and beh...

    Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug Might Help Save Hospitalized COVID Patients

    As doctors around the world come up against severe cases of COVID-19, some positive news has emerged: New research shows the rheumatoid arthritis drug baricitinib may help reduce hospitalized COVID patients' risk of death.

    Current standard-of-care medications aren't enough, said study co-author Dr. E. Wesley Ely, a professor of medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville...

    COVID-19 Vaccines Boost Antibodies, Even in People With Weak Immune Systems

    COVID-19 vaccines trigger antibody production in most people who have weakened immune systems, but a new study reveals that their responses are weaker than in healthy people.

    "Some of our patients have been hesitant about getting vaccinated, which is unfortunate because they are at increased risk of having more severe cases of COVID-19 if they happen to get infected, compared to those not...

    Could a Long-Used Cholesterol Drug Fight Severe COVID-19?

    A drug that lowers cholesterol might help save hospitalized patients with COVID-19, a new, small Israeli study suggests.

    Researchers at Hebrew University of Jerusalem noted that COVID causes a big buildup of cholesterol, which results in inflammation in cells.

    In lab experiments, they found that the cholesterol-lowering drug fenofibrate (TriCor) effectively reduced damage to lung ce...

    More Evidence Ties Gum Disease With Heart Disease

    New research offers further evidence of a link between gum disease and heart disease.

    The ongoing Swedish study previously found that gum disease ("periodontitis") was much more common in first-time heart attack patients than in a group of healthy people.

    In this follow-up study, the researchers examined whether gum disease was associated with an increased risk of new heart problems...

    Acupuncture May Help Ease Prostate-Linked Pain in Men: Study

    Men with chronic pain from prostate inflammation may get lasting relief from acupuncture, a new clinical trial finds.

    At issue is a condition known as chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, in which the prostate gland becomes inflamed and nerves supplying the area are irritated. That can cause pain in the perineum, penis, scrotum and low belly, as well as urinary problems and s...

    New Clues to Why Disability Strikes People With MS

    A new study may help explain why people with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience worsening disability while those with two related diseases do not.

    MS causes permanent brain and spinal cord scarring, and researchers investigated whether the same damage accompanies two rarer, similar diseases in which the immune system also attacks the central nervous system.

    The diseases are known a...

    Kids Who Grew Up With Smokers Have Higher Odds for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    While breathing in secondhand smoke is known to harm kids' lungs, new research suggests that children whose parents smoked are also more prone to developing rheumatoid arthritis later in life.

    "Our findings give more depth and gravity to the negative health consequences of smoking in relation to [rheumatoid arthritis], one of the most common autoimmune diseases," said lead author Dr. Kazu...

    Lyme Disease Can Wreak Havoc on Mental Health

    Lyme disease can exact a significant mental toll as well as a physical one on its sufferers, a new study confirms.

    Patients hospitalized for Lyme disease had a 28% higher incidence of mental disorders and were twice as likely to attempt suicide than people without Lyme, researchers report.

    "These findings highlight the need for greater awareness in the medical community that patien...

    Dexamethasone Can Help the Sickest COVID Patients Survive. So Why Are Too Few Getting It?

    There's strong evidence that the steroid drug dexamethasone can significantly lower hospitalized patients' risk of dying from COVID-19, but many who might benefit from it the most aren't getting it.

    "Dexamethasone is a steroid that is used for the treatment of arthritis, inflammation and allergic reactions," explained Hemalkumar Mehta, who studied its use in treating COVID-19 patients. He...

    New Clues to What Triggers Dangerous Syndrome in Kids With COVID

    New research offers insight into a rare but dangerous inflammatory disease that can occur in children after COVID-19 infection, researchers report.

    More than 2,600 cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) have been reported in the United States since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    It's characterized by fever, pain and inflammation of multiple organs, inclu...

    Teens' Heart Risk From COVID Far Exceeds That of Vaccination: Study

    Teens have a far greater risk of heart inflammation from COVID-19 than from the vaccines that protect against it, new research shows.

    "Comparative risk can complicate decisions for parents in such highly charged health debates," said lead author Mendel Singer, vice chair for education at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland.

    "But our study shows that for ...

    Severe COVID in Kids: Rare, but Brain Issues Can Result

    About one in 20 kids hospitalized with COVID-19 develop debilitating brain or nerve complications that could haunt some for a long time, a new British study reports.

    Children with severe infections can suffer from brain inflammation, seizures, stroke, behavior changes, hallucinations and psychosis.

    About one-third of the stricken kids had symptoms that didn't resolve in the short te...

    Chinese Man Dies of Rare Virus From Monkeys

    A Chinese researcher has died after catching a rare infectious disease called the Monkey B virus, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention officials say.

    In March, the 53-year-old veterinarian dissected two dead monkeys as part of his work in a Beijing research institute specializing in nonhuman primate breeding. He developed nausea, vomiting and fever a month later, and died May...

    Fermented Foods Could Boost Your Microbiome

    Fermented foods may seem like just another health fad, but a small trial suggests they can help strike a healthier balance in the body's gut bacteria.

    In a study of 36 people, researchers found that those randomly assigned to eat plenty of fermented foods, such as yogurt, kimchi and kombucha, showed an increase in their gut "microbiome" diversity.

    The microbiome refers to the vast c...

    Heart Troubles Ease Over Time in Kids With MIS-C

    Here's some reassuring news for parents: Most heart problems in children with a rare inflammatory condition triggered by COVID-19 infection resolve within a few months, a new study finds.

    Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) causes inflammation throughout the body, and many patients develop a range of non-respiratory symptoms such as abdominal pain, skin rashes, heart abn...

    Some COVID Survivors Can't Regain Weight Lost During Illness

    Some people severely ill with COVID-19 may struggle to regain lost weight for months afterward, a new study shows.

    While COVID-19 is primarily a respiratory illness, it's become clear that the infection can wreak havoc on the body in many ways. Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms -- like nausea, diarrhea and even bleeding in the digestive tract -- are among the manifestations.

    In some ca...

    Autopsy Study Shows How COVID Harms the Brain

    The brains of people who died from COVID-19 were remarkably similar to the brains of people who die from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, showing inflammation and disrupted circuitry, researchers report.

    "The brains of patients who died from severe COVID-19 showed profound molecular markers of inflammation, even though those patients didn't have any reporte...

    Could Fish Oil Supplements Help Fight Depression?

    Fish oil supplements are often touted as good for your heart health, but a new study finds they may also help fight depression.

    "Using a combination of laboratory and patient research, our study has provided exciting new insight into how omega-3 fatty acids bring about anti-inflammatory effects that improve depression," said lead author Alessandra Borsini, a postdoctoral neuroscientist at...

    Living With HIV Raises Odds for Sudden Cardiac Death

    People living with HIV have to take powerful drug cocktails to keep their disease in check, but a new study finds they also need to worry about a doubled risk of sudden cardiac death.

    Unlike a heart attack caused by a blocked heart artery, sudden cardiac death can happen without warning and is triggered by an electrical malfunction that causes an irregular heartbeat. Within minutes, there...

    What Diet Is Most Likely to Help Ease Crohn's Disease?

    People who have Crohn's disease often seek to ease their symptoms by changing what they eat, and new research suggests the Mediterranean diet may be their best bet.

    The study evaluated one of the commonly used diets for Crohn's disease, known as the specific carbohydrate diet (SCD), comparing it with the Mediterranean diet, which is sometimes recommended by doctors for its heart health be...

    A Woman's Diet Might Help Her Avoid Breast Cancer

    Women whose diets tend to feed inflammation may have a heightened risk of breast cancer, a preliminary study suggests.

    The study, of more than 350,000 women, found that the more "pro-inflammatory" foods women consumed, the higher their breast cancer risk.

    The term refers to foods thought to contribute to chronic low-grade inflammation throughout the body - a state implicated in vari...

    First Case of COVID-19 Triggering Recurrent Clots in Patient's Arm

    Researchers have reported the first case of COVID-19 causing dangerous, recurring blood clots in a patient's arm.

    The report offers new insight into how the damage of inflammation caused by COVID-19 can linger and how best to treat recurring clots, the Rutgers University researchers said.

    There have been reports of lower extremity blood clots in patients after COVID-19, but this is ...

    Clues to Rare Disorder Affecting Kids With COVID-19

    New insight into a rare and dangerous disorder that can occur in kids with COVID-19 could improve treatment of the condition, researchers say.

    Many children infected with SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) go undiagnosed or have no symptoms, but about one in 1,000 develop a condition called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) within four to six weeks.

    Symp...

    New Drug Shows Promise Against Tough-to-Manage Asthma

    An experimental injectable drug appears more versatile than existing medications in treating people with different forms of severe, hard-to-control asthma, clinical trial results show.

    There are many different types of asthma brought on by many different triggers, and a number of monoclonal antibody medications -- called "biologics" -- have been crafted to target distinct asthma triggers....

    COVID-19 Appears to Have No Lasting Impact on College Athletes' Hearts

    Heart complications are rare among college athletes who have had COVID-19, according to a small study.

    "Our findings may offer reassurance to high school athletes, coaches and parents where resources for testing can be limited," said senior author Dr. Ranjit Philip, assistant professor in pediatric cardiology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, in Memphis.

    For the ...

    Researchers Seek Antiviral Pill That Would Ease COVID Severity

    While COVID-19 research efforts must now shift toward the development of a pill that can prevent serious illness in the recently infected, experts say.

    "We need a pill that can keep people out of the hospital, and the time to develop that is right now," Dr. Rajesh Gandhi said during a Thursday media briefing by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. He is director of HIV Clinical Ser...

    COVID-19 Could Raise Odds for Heart Failure, Even in Those With No Prior Heart Risk

    In rare cases, people hospitalized for COVID-19 can develop heart failure, even if their hearts were previously healthy, new research shows.

    The researchers found that of over 6,400 COVID-19 patients at their hospital, 0.6% newly developed heart failure. That included eight patients -- mostly relatively young men -- with no history of heart disease or risk factors for it.

    Heart fail...