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Results for search "Heart Pacemakers".

Health News Results - 17

Smart Phones, Watches Can Mess With Implanted Pacemakers

Do you have an implanted defibrillator or pacemaker? Try keeping your smart watch or smart phone a few inches away from them.

New research from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration finds that your phone or watch could interfere with implanted heart devices.

Based on the new findings, heart patients and health care providers should be aware of potential risks, the research team...

Coming Soon: An Implanted Pacemaker That Dissolves Away After Use

Researchers are reporting early success with a temporary heart pacemaker that simply dissolves when it's no longer needed.

So far the work has been limited to animals and human heart tissue studied in the lab. But experts said the early findings are "exciting" and could eventually change the care of patients who need a pacemaker for only days to weeks.

Pacemakers are devices that ar...

Elections Can Be Tough on Americans' Hearts

A U.S. presidential election can be hard on your heart.

That's the takeaway from two new studies that look back on the 2016 race between Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton.

For one, researchers investigated heart rhythm disorders in more than 2,400 adults in North Carolina (average age: 70.8 years) who had implanted defibrillators or pacemakers that could be monit...

Magnets in Cellphones, Smartwatches Might Affect Pacemakers, FDA Warns

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning that strong magnets in some cellphones and smartwatches can interfere with pacemakers and other implanted medical devices.

Studies have shown that these high-strength magnets may cause some implants to switch to "magnet mode," stopping normal functioning until the magnet is moved away from the device.

Many implants have a "magnet mode...

'Heart-in-a-Box' Can Be Lifesaving, Matching Up Distant Donors With Patients

A few days after his 74th birthday, Don Stivers received his dream gift -- a new heart.

"I was born with a very lousy heart," he explained. "Growing up, I decided I was going to overcome it and go to the Olympics and be a strong boy. And so everything I did was against doctors' orders. They said don't run, don't do this, but I did anyway, and I would turn blue and pass out, and my mother...

Music Could Be a Post-Op Panacea, Study Finds

Heart surgery can be stressful, but researchers may have found a way to reduce patients' anxiety and postoperative pain -- without any extra side effects.

A team from the Netherlands found that the simple act of listening to music around the time of surgery may help patients as they recover.

"This is a fascinating question for heart surgeons because we perform the most invasive proc...

MRIs Might Be Safe for Patients With Implanted Heart Devices

For years, people with implanted heart devices have been told they can't undergo MRI scans. But a new study adds to evidence that, with certain measures in place, the procedure is safe.

The study focused on patients with older pacemakers and implantable defibrillators that were not designed to be more compatible with MRI scanners. The researchers found that when a particular protocol ...

'Heat Not Burn' Cigarettes Can Still Harm the Heart

"Heat-not-burn" tobacco products, created as an alternative to other types of smoking, may harm the user's heart, researchers report.

These tobacco products -- think IQOS from Philip Morris -- are billed as substitutes for e-cigarettes or traditional smokes. But a new review finds they may be tied to heart and blood vessel harms.

Researchers found the inhalants were linked ...

Could Your E-Cig Disrupt Your Pacemaker?

The magnets in vaping devices might be able to wreak havoc on heart pacemakers and defibrillators, a new case report suggests.

By placing a Juul in his shirt pocket, a heart patient caused his implanted pacemaker and defibrillator to malfunction, his health care providers said.

"To our knowledge, this is the first time it's been reported," said report author Julie Shea, nurs...

1 in 5 Heart Pacemaker Patients Prescribed Opioids After Surgery

Opioid painkillers are prescribed to 1 in 5 patients who get a pacemaker or other implantable heart device, a new study finds.

It included more than 16,500 U.S. adults who had heart devices implanted between 2010 and 2018.

After their procedures, opioids were prescribed to about 20%. Of those, 80% had never taken opioids before. Among those patients, more than 9%...

Pacemakers, Insulin Pumps Could Be Hacking Targets: FDA

Medical devices that can connect to the internet might be at risk for hacking, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Tuesday.

"While advanced devices can offer safer, more convenient and timely health care delivery, a medical device connected to a communications network could have cybersecurity vulnerabilities that could be exploited resulting in patient harm," said Dr. Amy Abe...

Radiation Rx Might Ease a Dangerous Irregular Heart Beat

A new technique that uses a targeted high dose of radiation seems to prevent recurrence of a potentially deadly heartbeat for at least two years, researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report.

This irregular rhythm, called ventricular tachycardia (VT), occurs when the heart's lower chambers start to beat uncontrollably fast. Once it starts, it can kill ...

Large Opioid Rx After Heart, Lung Surgery Often Leads to Misuse: Study

The more opioid painkillers that heart and lung surgery patients are prescribed, the more likely they are to become dependent on them, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed insurance claims from more than 24,500 Medicare patients who had heart or lung surgery between 2009 and 2015. Those patients filled an opioid prescription between 30 days before surgery and 14 days after leaving ...

Good Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar Levels Can Prevent 'Heart Block'

Keeping blood pressure and blood sugar levels under control might prevent a common heart rhythm disorder called "heart block."

That's the finding from a new study analyzing data on more than 6,000 people, aged 30 and older, in Finland.

In the study, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) researchers found that 58 of those people developed heart block over an av...

Airport Scanners OK for People with Implanted Heart Devices: Study

It appears to be safe for people with implantable heart devices such as pacemakers and defibrillators to go through body scanners at airport security checkpoints, researchers say.

Body scanners are becoming increasingly common worldwide.

But some people are concerned that they may be a source of electromagnetic interference (EMI) that could disrupt implantable devices used t...

'Antibiotic Envelopes' Could Cut Infections After Pacemaker Implant

Tucking a pacemaker inside an antibiotic-soaked mesh envelope before implanting it inside your body can drastically reduce your risk of a dangerous infection, a new study shows.

About 1.7 million patients receive cardiac implants like pacemakers or defibrillators every year worldwide, and doctors use preoperative antibiotics to lower the chances of infectio...

Coming Soon: Battery-Free Pacemakers Powered by the Heart?

Scientists say they've taken a first step toward creating a pacemaker that runs on the heart's own energy rather than batteries.

Pacemakers are electronic devices implanted to regulate your heartbeat -- usually because of a condition that slows your heart's normal rate. Traditional pacemakers have two parts: a battery-powered pulse generator implanted under the collarbone, and insulat...