COVID 19 VACCINE NOW AVAILABLE - PLEASE CALL US AT 304-789-2200 TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT!
COVID VACCINE REGISTRATION FORM
COVID VACCINE FACT SHEET

Download our NEW mobile app!!! Quickly request refills or login and manage your prescriptions on the go!
Available on both iTunes and Android.

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Psychology / Mental Health: Misc.".

Health News Results - 786

Could Face Masks Make You Better-Looking?

Want to look more alluring? Wear a mask.

Really.

That's the takeaway from Welsh researchers who found that masking up may make men look more attractive to the opposite sex and that some kinds of masks do a better job of this than others.

“Research carried ou...

For Transgender People, Starting Hormone Therapy in Teens Helps Mental Health

Transgender people get greater mental health benefits if they start gender-affirming hormone treatment when they're teens instead of waiting until they're adults, a new study finds.

"This study is particularly relevant now because many state legislatures are introducing bills that would outlaw this kind of care for

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • January 14, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Worried About Your Teen's Social Media Use? Experts Offer Help

    Is your teen staring at their smartphone all day? There's many things parents can do to protect kids from the potentially negative effects of social media, experts say.

    While there are positive aspects to social media, there's evidence it can pose risks to teens' mental health due...

    Kids' Behavior Worsened With Remote Learning: Study

    Parents, brace yourselves.

    As the Omicron variant surges and U.S. schools deal with a substitute teacher shortage and related pandemic fallout, don't be surprised if a return to remote or hybrid learning leads your kids to act out, a new study warns.

    Previous shifts from in-person to re...

    Will Reading Books Make You Any Happier?

    When it comes to what makes us happy, is reading or listening to music any better than spending hours playing video games?

    Not really, says a team of researchers from the United Kingdom and Austria.

    "Many people believe traditional media, like reading books or listening to music, are good for us," said study leader Niklas Johannes, from the University of Oxford.

    "Surprisingly...

    Zoom Meeting Anxiety Doesn't Strike Everyone

    The pandemic has made Zoom meetings a daily reality for millions. For many, having to watch their own face in a meeting is the worst part.

    But that's not true for everyone, new research shows.

    "Most people believe that seeing yourself during virtual meetings contributes to making the overall experience worse, but that's not what showed up in my data," said study author Kristine Kuh...

    Do You Have 'COVID-somnia'? These Sleep Tips Might Help

    If the pandemic is causing you to lose sleep at night, you’re not alone.

    About 56% of Americans say they have what experts have dubbed “COVID-somnia,” an increase in sleep disturbances.

    Of people reporting these disturbances, 57% say they're having trouble falling or staying asleep. About 46% are sleepin...

    Weak Action on Climate Change Is Stressing Young People Worldwide

    While climate change calls to mind extreme weather and melting polar ice caps, government officials' inaction to stop it is also affecting the mental health of young people, new research reveals.

    "This study paints a horrific picture of widespread climate anxiety in our children and young peo...

    Ketamine May Quickly Ease Tough-to-Treat Depression

    Ketamine, once most famous as a "club" drug, can rapidly improve hard-to-treat depression and curb suicidal thoughts, a new review confirms.

    In recent years, ketamine has emerged as something of a wonder drug for some people who do not get better with standa...

    Heat Waves Bring Health Crises to the Homeless

    Add heat waves to the many health threats facing homeless people.

    Last year, the United States had 580,000 homeless people — 28% of them in California, where seven in 10 live outdoors. That's nearly nine times more than in any other state.

    "The same weather that makes living unsheltered possible in California also exposes people experiencing homelessness to a higher risk of a wide...

    When Gums Aren't Healthy, Mind and Body May Follow

    Gum disease isn't just a threat to your teeth. It also increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, mental woes and more, British researchers report.

    "The study reinforces the importance of prevention, early identification and treatment of periodontal disease, and the need for members of th...

    Severe Illness in a Child Takes Big Toll on Parents, Siblings: Study

    When a child has severe health problems, the suffering often extends to the entire family, new research finds.

    Using data from a single health insurance provider, the study authors assessed nearly 7,000 children with life-threatening conditions and their families, and compared them to a control group of more than 18,600 children without a life-threatening condition and their families.

    ...

    Parents Underestimate How Much Time Teens Spent Online During Pandemic

    Parents, think you have a good handle on how much time your teens are spending on social media?

    Don't bet on it. New research suggests your best guesstimate is likely way off.

    Parents significantly underestimated their teens' social media use — especially girls' — during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, the study showed.

    "Although most parents and their teens spe...

    Americans' Stigma Against Depression May Finally Be Fading: Study

    Americans may be dropping some of the stigma they once had toward depression, but attitudes toward other mental health conditions still seem stuck in the past, a new study shows.

    The research, based on interviews with U.S. adults conducted over 22 years, found a mixed bag when it came to menta...

    Fish Oil Has No Effect on Depression, Study Finds

    They may have other proven health benefits, but new research shows that fish oil supplements don't prevent depression or improve mood.

    Some experts recommend omega-3 fish oil supplements to help prevent depression in high-risk patients, but studies have yielded mixed results and there are no g...

    'You Didn't Tag Me!' Instagram Snubs Hurt, Study Confirms

    Think what happens online stays online? Think again.

    According to new research, a social media diss can leave people feeling genuinely hurt and ostracized.

    "Social media ostracism means being excluded or ignored online on social media networks like Instagram, Facebook or Twitter," explained lead study author Christiane Büttner. She's a PhD candidate in the department of social psy...

    Make Asthma, Allergy Control Your Resolution for the New Year

    If your New Year's resolution is to keep your allergy and asthma symptoms under control in 2022, it's best to do so in small steps, an expert says.

    "The best way to tackle health challenges is in small bits, and that goes for allergy and asthma control," said Dr. Mark Corbett, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

    "The last few years have been ...

    Most IVF Babies Grow Up to Be Mentally Healthy Adults, Study Shows

    There is no increased risk of mental health problems in teens and young adults who were conceived through in-vitro fertilization (IVF), Swedish researchers report.

    Although those born after assisted reproductive techniques did have a slightly higher risk of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), it owed to parental background factors, they said.

    Since 1978, more than 9 million childre...

    Mom & Dad's Holiday Stress a Downer for Kids, Poll Finds

    Many parents want to make the holiday season magical for their kids, but for some the stress they feel trying to live up to that ideal may actually be doing the opposite.

    A poll from Michigan Medicine found that about 1 in 5 parents said their ...

    Unsung Heroes of the Pandemic: Dogs

    Coping with the isolation, fear and sadness of the pandemic may have been a little easier if you had a trusting and loving dog by your side.

    But you don't need to tell that to Francois Martin, a researcher who studies the bonds between animals and humans. His two Great Danes helped him through the last two years, and he just completed a study that shows living with a dog gave folks a stro...

    Too Many Fertility Specialists Still Use a Painful, Useless Procedure: Study

    Couples struggling to conceive a child through in vitro fertilization (IVF) sometimes are offered an often-painful procedure known as "scratching the womb" as a desperate last hope to get pregnant.

    As many as one-third of IVF clinics offer the practice in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, a new survey reports. It's very likely some U.S. clinics also offer the procedure, altho...

    Stress May Be Stronger Trigger for Problem Drinking in Women Than Men

    When someone says "I need a drink," it's usually because they've had a rough day. Now, new research suggests that stress is more likely to trigger heavy drinking in women than in men.

    "Some people can intend to have one or two alcoholic beverages and stop drinking, but other people just keep going," said study leader Julie Patock-Peckham. She's head of the Social Addictions Impulse Lab at...

    Online Programs, Phone Apps Can Help Treat Depression

    People with depression symptoms might find some help from online programs or smartphone apps — but the human component remains key, a new research review suggests.

    Not everyone with depression can readily get to face-to-face therapy — whether due to time, distance, money or stigma. But smartphones are...

    Logic's Hit '1-800-273-8255' May Have Saved American Lives

    "I been on a low; I been taking my time; I feel like I'm out of my mind; I feel like my life ain't mine; who can relate?"

    New research suggests many Americans did relate to the opening lyrics of "1-800-273-8255," a 2017 hit song from U.S. hip hop artist Logic. The data finds a significant rise in calls to the national suicide hotline soon after the chart-topping single's release....

    For Many, Holiday Joy Is Shadowed by COVID Fears: Poll

    Stress about the COVID-19 pandemic may be eclipsing holiday joy for many older Americans, a new poll reveals.

    About half (47%) of 50- to 80-year-olds polled reported a mixed experience of joy and stress.

    One in five said they feel a lot of stress, while 38% said ...

    Are Rocket Scientists, Brain Surgeons Really Smarter Than Other Folks?

    "It's not rocket science," "It's not brain surgery" -- but just how smart are rocket scientists and brain surgeons, anyway?

    There's a good chance you're just as intelligent, a new study finds.

    This was an observational study that does not represent the worldwide range of aerospace engineers and neurosurgeons, the British researchers said. But the findings do suggest that fo...

    Pandemic Brought Big Rise in New Cases of Anorexia

    A new study confirms yet another consequence of the pandemic for children and teenagers: Eating disorders, and hospitalizations for them, rose sharply in 2020.

    The study of six hospitals across Canada found new diagnoses of anorexia nearly doubled during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. And the rate of hospitalization among those patients was almost threefold higher, versus pre-pa...

    Certain Meds Raise Odds for Delirium After Surgery

    Older adults have a higher risk of delirium after hip and knee surgery if they're taking anxiety, depression or insomnia drugs, researchers say.

    "Our findings show that different classes of medicine are riskier than others when it comes to causing delirium after surgery, and the older the patients are, the greater the risk," said lead study author Gizat Kassie. He is a postdoctoral resear...

    Omicron Latest Mental Blow to Americans Exhausted by Pandemic

    First, the COVID-19 pandemic brought panic, with successive waves of infection and death, including the emergence this year of the Delta variant.

    Then vaccines offered the promise of a recovery, with a speed -- and on a scale -- never before seen.

    But now, the Omicron variant is sending Americans on another emotional roller-coaster ride that mental health experts say is the last th...

    US Surgeon General Report Warns of Mental Health Crisis Hitting Youth

    The pandemic has intensified mental health struggles that were already widespread among American teens, U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy warned Tuesday.

    The pandemic and other major issues faced by their generation are causing "devastating" mental health effects in young people, he warned in a new

  • Robert Preidt and Robin Foster
  • |
  • December 8, 2021
  • |
  • Full Page
  • 1 in 3 College Freshmen Has Depression, Anxiety

    Starting college can be a time of fun, new experiences and growth. Yet it can also be a rough transition for many students who struggle with mental health issues.

    A new study from researchers in the United Kingdom and Canada found about one-third of first-year students have or develop moderate to severe anxiety or depression.

    When these young adults had increasing use of illicit dru...

    'Magic Mushroom' Drug Edges Toward Mainstream Therapy

    Tony Head was depressed and fearing death from stage 4 prostate cancer when, as part of a supervised scientific trial, he took a large dose of the psychedelic agent in "magic mushrooms," psilocybin.

    Head donned a mask and headphones to shut out the world around him, and had an experience that changed the course of his life.

    "At some point in that time I felt like a higher power or ...

    After Vaccines & Easing of Lockdowns, College Students' Mental Health Still Poor

    College students are not bouncing back from the changes brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, a troubling new study finds.

    Researchers were surprised to find that one year after the start of the pandemic, college students were still less active and more at risk for depression even as social restrictions were lifted and many were vaccinated.

    While the new study focused on the experien...

    Pandemic Stress, Exhaustion Weigh on Health Care Workers

    The pandemic is taking a toll on health care workers' sleep, which can put both their mental health and patient care at risk, researchers warn.

    Their study of more than 800 New York City health care workers found that compared to those with no sleep problems, those with poor sleep were two times more likely to report symptoms of depression, 70% more likely to report anxiety, and 50% more...

    Psychiatric Disorders and Type 2 Diabetes Often Go Together

    According to new research, people with psychiatric disorders often have to deal with another trouble: Higher rates of type 2 diabetes than the general population.

    "Increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes among individuals with a psychiatric disorder suggests that these conditions have a shared vulnerability," the Danish researchers said.

    In the study, the investigators searched four...

    A Pre-Game Routine Can Boost an Athlete's Performance: Study

    NBA great Michael Jordan had a special ritual he would follow before every free throw: He would assume a shoulder-width stance, spin the basketball in his hands, bounce the ball three times, and then spin the ball once more while focusing on the rim before finally taking his shot.

    Now, new research suggests similar routines could improve your sports performance, whether you're an amateur ...

    As Holidays Return to Normal, Here's How to De-Stress

    A return to a more normal holiday season may also mean higher stress levels, so an expert offers some coping tips.

    Don't get too focused on buying the perfect presents, making the best dinner or planning the perfect party. Try to be mindful of pleasant things and moments, suggested Jennifer Wegmann, a health and wellness studies lecturer at Binghamton University, State University of New Y...

    Give Others Help, Get Back Health Benefits: Study

    When it comes to helping others and your health, it might be better to give than to receive, a new study suggests.

    Researchers surveyed more than 1,000 Americans between 34 and 84 about their social involvement and how much they thought they could rely on their family, friends or a spouse if they needed help.

    On a key measure of health -- chronic inflammation -- positive social rela...

    Abortion Remains Medically Safe for U.S. Women

    Debate rages over access to abortion, but experts say the collected medical evidence makes one thing clear — it is a fundamentally safe procedure for women.

    Abortion is safer than childbirth and it's also safer than a host of other common procedures — colonoscopy, tonsillectomy and plastic surgery, said Dr. Sarah Prager, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Wa...

    1 in 5 Avoided Health Care During Pandemic, Study Finds

    One in five adults avoided seeking health care during the COVID-19 pandemic, even when they had symptoms suggesting the need for urgent medical attention, according to researchers in the Netherlands.

    "Health care avoidance during COVID-19 may be prevalent amongst those who are in greater need of it in the population, such as older individuals," a team led by Silvan Licher, of Erasmus Univ...

    Adults With ADHD Face 4 Times the Odds for Anxiety Disorder

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is not just a childhood disorder, and new research shows that adults with ADHD are four times more likely to have anxiety disorder.

    "These findings underline how vulnerable adults with ADHD are to generalized anxiety disorders," said study author Esme Fuller-Thomson. She is a professor at the University of Toronto's Factor-Inwentash Faculty ...

    Social Media Tied to Higher Risk of Depression

    The latest in a spate of studies investigating links between use of social media and depression suggests the two go hand in hand.

    "The relationship between social media and mental health has been the subject of a lot of debate," said Dr. Roy Perlis, lead author of the new study. He's director of the Center for Experimental Drugs and Diagnostics at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston....

    Singer Selena Gomez to Launch Mental Health Platform

    A new mental health media platform meant to connect people with educational resources and reduce the stigma around mental illness is planned by pop star Selena Gomez and her partners.

    Wondermind is set to launch in February 2022 and will include mental health experts sharing their expertise, and daily exercises that people can do to strengthen their mental health, CNN reported.

    Most Parents Say Their Kids Aren't Thankful Enough: Poll

    As American families sit down to celebrate Thanksgiving, a majority of parents say they want to raise grateful kids but they don't think they're succeeding.

    Four out of five respondents to a new nationwide poll said children aren't as thankful as they should be, and half worry that they overindulge their own kids. Two in five also said they're sometimes embarrassed by how selfish their ch...

    Many Kids Separated From Families at U.S. Border Suffer PTSD

    Parents and children who were separated under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy have shown lasting psychological trauma -- even after being reunited, a new study finds.

    Between 2017 and 2018, more than 5,000 children were separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border under the policy, which aimed to deter asylum seekers.

    The practice was denounc...

    Teen Social Media Posts About Cutting, Other Self-Harm Are Soaring

    American teens are increasingly turning to the social media giant Instagram to share graphic images of their own attempts to harm themselves, a new study reveals.

    "It could be an attempt to share their emotional or psychological pain with others or find support from others," said study lead author Amanda Giordano. She is an associate professor of counseling and human development services ...

    Grandmother's Brain In Sync With Her Grandkids': Study

    Grandmothers can have a strong bond with the little children in their families — and the connection even shows up on brain scans, researchers say.

    The investigators embarked on a unique study, looking at the brains of older women — not for signs of dysfunction, as with dementia, but to study their connections with their grandchildren.

    "What really jumps out in the data is the ac...

    Better Work Conditions Bringing Better Mental Health to Resident Doctors: Study

    Medical training may be taking less of a mental health toll on young doctors than it used to, but depression remains common, a new study suggests.

    Medical residency -- the training that new doctors undergo at hospitals or clinics -- is infamous for its grueling schedule, high pressure and relatively low pay. Research has shown that residents also have fairly high depression rates.

    N...

    As Countries Become More Tolerant, Suicides Among Gay Men Decline

    A new study confirms that when a country is more accepting of people who are LGBTQ, fewer gay or bisexual men take their own lives.

    In a new study, researchers compared life in a country where LGBTQ folks encounter strong stigma with that in a country where stigma against them is low. The upshot: The risk of depression and suicide dropped significantly when gay men moved to a more toleran...

    Certain Antidepressants Appear to Curb Severe COVID-19

    Certain commonly prescribed antidepressants appear to substantially lower the risk of dying among seriously ill COVID-19 patients, a large new study indicates.

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are among the most widely prescribed drugs for the treatment of depression. They include drugs like Lexapro (escitalopram), Paxil (paroxetine) and Zoloft (sertraline).

    "We saw t...

    Show All Health News Results