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Results for search "Race".

19 May

HealthDay Now: Maternal Mortality Crisis Hits Black Mothers Hardest

HealthDay’s Mabel Jong will be joined by Stacey D. Stewart, the president & CEO of March of Dimes, and Dr. Chereena Walker, a hospitalist and mother of two from Missouri who experienced severe complications during her pregnancies. Stewart and Walker will discuss the risks that pregnant women — particularly women of color — face in the United States.

Health News Results - 416

Women Exposed to Racism at Higher Odds for Premature Delivery

Numerous studies have found discrimination can hurt aspects of human health.

Now, new research adds to that the impact of discrimination on the youngest humans by linking discrimination with a heightened risk of underweight and premature infants.

Maternal death rates amo...

Race Plays Role in How Soon Babies With Cystic Fibrosis Get Care

Babies who are white appear to get diagnostic appointments for cystic fibrosis earlier than babies of several other races and ethnicities, new research shows.

This can cause gaps in care and outcomes.

While it is recommended that infants who have an initial positive screening for cystic fibrosis be furt...

Black, Hispanic Patients Less Likely to Get Crucial Care After Heart Attack

TUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- When they suffer a heart attack, Black and Hispanic patients in the United States receive subpar care compared with white patients, new research reveals.

The study of more than 87,000 insured

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 2, 2022
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  • Experiences of Racism Tied to Worsening Memory, Thinking in Older Black Americans

    Black and Hispanic Americans are more likely than others to be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, and new research suggests that racism is a contributor.

    Experiences of structural, interpersonal and institutional <...

    Black Patients More Likely to Lose Vision After Glaucoma Diagnosis

    Black patients should start screening early for glaucoma, because they have a high risk of vision loss caused by elevated pressure levels inside the eye, researchers say.

    A team from New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai found that African heritage was an independent risk factor for

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 26, 2022
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  • Black Nursing Home Residents More Likely to Need Hospital Care

    Black residents in U.S. nursing homes are much more likely than white residents to be repeatedly transferred to hospital care, a new study reports.

    Black nursing home residents are likely to be transferred to the hospital and back at least four times in a given year, according to data gathered under a U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid quality improvement initiative.

    So are nurs...

    Common Lung Function Test Often Misses Emphysema in Black Patients

    The most common test of lung function, spirometry, probably is not detecting signs of emphysema in some people with the lung ailment, a new study says.

    In particular, Black men are at greater risk of suffering from undiagnosed emphysema, since the way spirometry results are interpreted ap...

    Minority Students More Likely to Leave Medical School: Study

    Medical schools are doing a better job of recruiting minority students, but they still struggle to keep those would-be doctors on...

    Neighborhood Drop in Violent Crime May Also Boost Heart Health

    Every town wants low crime rates. But a new finding may offer a whole new reason to advocate for the change: Falling crime rates may lower heart disease fatalities.

    An analysis of 2000-2014 data from Chicago illustrated a significant decline in violent crime. Across the city, the drop in total crime was 16%, while simultaneously there was a 13% decrease in

  • By Ellie Quinlan Houghtaling HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 18, 2022
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  • Common, Crucial Medical Device Often Gives Wrong Readings for Black Patients

    Early in the pandemic, scores of Americans bought pulse oximeters to help determine how sick they were while infected with COVID-19, but new research finds the devices often miss dangerously low blood oxygen levels in Black veterans.

    This is not the first time such inaccuracies...

    An Aggressive Leukemia Is Much More Lethal for Black Patients Than Whites - Why?

    Getting a blood cancer diagnosis is devastating for young people, but it is also far more deadly if the patient is Black, new research shows.

    The new study, which looked at outcomes for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), highlights an urgent need to understand racial and ethn...

    Vitamin D Deficiency Common in Young Black, Hispanic Americans

    Vitamin D, the "Sunshine Vitamin," boosts the immune system and helps prevent cancer, among other health benefits, but a significant number of Black and Hispanic teens have low levels of this nutrient, according to a new study.

    "This paper calls attention to the need to raise...

    Even When Stroke Centers Are Near, Black Americans Often Lack Access

    Even though Black people may be more likely to live near a hospital with a certified stroke center, those who need the specialty care are still more likely to receive it at a hospital with fewer resources.

    And this can hurt the...

    Why Do Black Women Have More Delays for Lifesaving Breast Biopsies?

    Women of color may face delays in getting a biopsy after a screening mammogram suggests they might have breast cancer, a large, new study finds.

    Researchers found that compared with white women, Asian, Black and Hispanic women were all more likely to wait over a month ...

    Which Americans Live Longest? Race, Region May Be Key

    Americans' life expectancy varies widely -- based not only on race, but where in the country they live.

    That's one of the overarching messages from a new study that looked, state by state, at Americans' life expectancy at birth. It found that between 1990 and 2019,

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 28, 2022
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  • Your Doctor's Gender, Race May Bias Your Treatment Outcome

    Deep-rooted bias may affect the way white patients physically respond to medical care provided by physicians of differing race or gender.

    Researchers assessed treatment reactions of nearly 200 white patients after they were randomly assigned to receive care from a male or female doctor who was either Black, white or Asian.

    White patients appeared to improve faster when treated by a...

    Just 1 in 4 Patients Get Rehab After Heart Attack, Cardiac Surgery

    Medically supervised exercise programs can do heart patients a lot of good, but few people of color take part in them -- regardless of income, new research finds.

    The study, of more than 100,000 U.S. patients, found that while all were eligible for cardiac rehabilitation, only...

    Race, Gender Matter in Receiving Timely Heart Attack Care

    Despite improvements in treatment for heart attacks, care lags behind for women.

    Women are still less likely to receive timely care, according to a new study that reviewed 450,000 patient records for two types of heart attacks.

    "Heart attack treatments have come a long way but timely acc...

    Kids' Access to Insulin Pumps: Race, Income Matters

    Overall use of insulin pumps among U.S. youngsters with type 1 diabetes has climbed in recent decades, but those who are poor or from minority groups are less likely to have the devices, a new study finds.

    Insulin pumps, which do away with the need for numerous painful injections, have been shown to ...

    Life Span of Native Americans Fell by Almost 5 Years During Pandemic

    In yet another sign that the pandemic has exacerbated disparities in health care, researchers report that the life expectancy of Native Americans plummeted by nearly five years as the new coronavirus raged across the country.

    The loss in longevity was far greater than any other ethnic group and about three times h...

    Race Matters in Stroke Survival, Study Finds

    Racial disparities in health outcomes persist in the United States, with Black and Hispanic Americans more likely to die within a month after a bleeding stroke than white Americans, a new study shows.

    "We've known that there are disparities in death from stroke among racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. due to

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 2, 2022
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  • Colon Cancer Death Rates Are Falling Among the Young - But Only for Whites

    Race and ethnicity matter when battling colon cancer, with young white patients facing notably better odds than Black, Hispanic or Asian patients, new research warns.

    A look at colon cancer survival among Americans younger than 50 turned up a glaring discrepancy: Survival five years after diagnosis improved to nearly 70% among white patients over two decades, but was less than 58% among B...

    U.S. Maternal Mortality Crisis Hits Black Women Hardest

    With Roe v. Wade hanging in the balance and nearly half of all American states ready to practically ban abortion if the leaked draft opinion from the Supreme Court stands, the realities of giving birth in this country are being put under a microscope, and for good reason.

    "Today, [America] is considered the most dangerous developed nation in the world in which to give birth," said St...

    Good News, Bad News on Black Americans and Cancer

    A new report on how Black Americans are faring against cancer offers up a decidedly mixed picture.

    The risk that a Black man or woman in America will die from cancer has steadily declined over the last two decades, the newly published research found.

    Unfortunately, that risk...

    Hispanics Wait Half-Hour Longer in ER When Chest Pain Strikes

    When Hispanic Americans arrive in the emergency room with chest pain, they have to wait longer for care than other people with the same symptoms, a preliminary study finds.

    Chest pain, a potential sign of heart attack, is one of the leading reasons people end up in an ER. But the new findings suggest that Hispanic patients may face unnecessary delays in either receiving care, being admitt...

    Why Emphysema May Often Be Missed in Black Men

    Emphysema is missed more often in Black Americans than in white Americans, and now researchers report they have figured out why.

    The investigators found that many Black men who were considered to have normal results after race-specific interpretations of a common lung function test called spirometry actually had emphysema when assessed using computed tomography (CT).

    Emphysema invol...

    Is Telemedicine Closing the 'Race Gap' in Primary Care?

    Here's one way in which the pandemic did not exacerbate health care disparities: A new study shows that telemedicine has closed the gap in access to primary care between Black and non-Black Americans.

    The use of telemedicine boomed during the pandemic, so University ...

    Depression, Anxiety Hit Minorities Hardest During Pandemic

    Americans' rates of depression and anxiety spiked during the first year of the pandemic, but the increases were much more pronounced among Black, Hispanic and Asian people than among white people, new research shows.

    From April 2020 to April 2021, the overall incidence of depression or

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 12, 2022
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  • Pregnant American Women Are Facing Higher Exposures to Chemicals

    Exposure to potentially harmful chemicals is on the rise among pregnant women in the United States, a new study warns.

    "This is the first time we've been able to measure the amounts of chemicals in such a large and diverse group of pregnant women - not just identify chemicals," ...

    It's Getting Tougher to Find Spanish-Language Mental Health Services in U.S.

    Mental health has become a hot topic during the pandemic, but some groups have been burdened by having too few services available even before the challenges of these past two years.

    A new study found that while the Hispanic population in the United States grew by almost 5% between 2014 and 2019, Spanish-language mental health services dropped by about 18% during that same time.

    "

    Uterine Cancer Rates Have Been Rising, and New Study Suggests Why

    Uterine cancer deaths have been increasing in the United States, particularly among Black women. Now, research appears to pinpoint a cause.

    A rare but aggressive type of cancer known as Type 2 endometrial cancer is more difficult to treat and was responsible for 20% of cases and 45% of deaths identified in the study.

    Deaths from this type of cancer increased by 2.7% per year during...

    Women, Black Patients Wait Longer in ERs When Chest Pain Strikes

    Women and people of color with chest pain - the most common symptom signaling a heart attack - face longer waits in U.S. emergency departments than men and white people do, new research reveals.

    For the study, researchers analyzed data on more than 4,000 patients, aged 18 to 55, seen for chest pain at emergenc...

    Bans on Affirmative Action Led to Fewer Black, Hispanic Doctors

    State bans on affirmative action have prompted a precipitous decline in the number of U.S. medical students from racial/ethnic minority groups, a new study finds.

    "We know that a more diverse physician workforce leads to better care for racial- and ethnic-minority patients," said lead researcher Dr. Dan Ly, a...

    Black Patients With A-Fib Less Likely to Get Blood Thinners

    Patients with atrial fibrillation usually receive blood thinners to reduce their stroke risk, but these drugs are under-prescribed to Black Americans, a new study reveals.

    When they leave the hospital, Black patients are 25% less likely than whites to be prescribed

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 3, 2022
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  • Black Patients Less Likely to Get High-Tech Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Use of a high-tech radiation cancer treatment called proton beam therapy (PBT) has increased overall in the United States, but Black patients are getting it less often than white patients, two ne...

    Does Race Affect the Odds of Developing MS?

    Black Americans are as likely to get multiple sclerosis (MS) as their white counterparts, but rates are much lower among Hispanic and Asian Americans, new research shows.

    The findings refute the long-held belief that MS is rare in Black people, according to the study authors. The findings were published online April 27 in the journal

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 2, 2022
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  • Race, Income Can Be Roadblocks to Recovery From Depression

    If you're battling depression, the success of your treatment might be affected by your race, income, job status and education, a new study says.

    "If you're going home to a wealthy neighborhood with highly educated parents or spouse, then you're arguably in a much better environment for the treatment to be effective than if you're going to a poor neighborhood with other problems," said stu...

    White Women Tend to Get Better Pain Management After Childbirth

    After childbirth, some women who received an epidural for pain will develop a debilitating headache. But minority women are less likely than white moms to receive the treatment that can provide relief, according to a new study.

    Researchers also found that even when women from minority groups received this care, it was more likely to be delayed.

    "There's a gap in the quality of care ...

    Among Minority Women, Low Vitamin D May Raise Breast Cancer Risk

    Insufficient vitamin D may play a role in breast cancer, especially among minority women, new research indicates.

    Black and Hispanic American women with low vitamin D levels have a higher risk of breast cancer than those with sufficient vitamin D levels, researchers found.

    The findings sugge...

    Inappropriate Antibiotic Prescribing in U.S. Seniors, Black Patients Reaches Alarming Levels

    The majority of antibiotic prescriptions for U.S. seniors and Black and Hispanic Americans are inappropriate, a new report reveals.

    For the study, researchers analyzed federal government data on more than 7 billion outpatient visits to doctors' offices, hospital clinics and emergency departments nationwide between 2009 and 2016.

    Nearly 8 million visits (11%) led to antibiotic prescr...

    Race Plays Huge Role in Dementia Risk

    Black, Hispanic and Asian Americans have an increased risk of being diagnosed with dementia as they age -- for reasons that are not entirely understood, a large new study finds.

    The study, of nearly 1.9 million older U.S. veterans, found that compared with their white counterparts, Black vets were 54% more likely to be diagnosed with dementia over a decade. That risk was nearly doubled am...

    School Segregation Tied to Problem Drinking Among Black Youth

    School segregation may sound like a relic from the past, but it has actually been increasing in the United States for years. Now a new study shows that has come with health consequences for Black children.

    Researchers found that in school districts with greater segregation, Black students tended to have more behavioral issues and were more likely to drink alcohol, versus their peers in mo...

    Black Patients Less Likely to Get Into Pancreatic Cancer Clinical Trials

    Black Americans are far less likely to be included in clinical trials of pancreatic cancer drugs than white Americans, and eligibility criteria are a significant factor in that gap, according to a new study.

    "The standard of care in cancer treatment is informed by studies conducted with predominantly non-Hispanic white patients," said study author Dr. Jose Trevino, chairman of surgical on...

    Black Cancer Patients Frailer Than Their Peers

    Older Black American cancer patients have higher rates of frailty and disability than their white peers, which may help explain why Black patients also have higher cancer death rates, new research suggests.

    The researchers noted that Black patients are more likely to die from cancer than most other groups, despite efforts to reduce

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 11, 2022
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  • U.S. Medical Schools' Faculty Still Lack Diversity: Study

    U.S. medical schools are not keeping pace with a nation that is more racially and ethnically diverse every day, a new study reports.

    The schools' clinical faculty and leadership are not as diverse as the communities around them, though ...

    Black, Hispanic Americans Less Likely to Get Bystander CPR

    If you collapse in a public place from a cardiac arrest, your chances of receiving lifesaving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are substantially better if you're white instead of Black or Hispanic, a new study finds.

    Black and Hispanic individuals who have out-of-hospital

  • Cara Murez
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  • March 28, 2022
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  • Black Patients Less Happy With Care After Knee, Hip Replacement

    Recovering from hip or knee replacement surgery can be tough for anyone, but a new study from one hospital showed that Black patients were less likely than white patients to be satisfied with their care after the procedure.

    Researchers reviewed survey responses from more than 2,500 people who un...

    Diversity Still Elusive in America's Medical Schools

    U.S. medical schools have a disproportionate number of wealthy students, which hinders attempts to improve diversity among U.S. doctors, researchers say.

    "In recent years, there has been a significant focus on the diversity of medical students, bu...

    Good End-of-Life Care Out of Reach for Many Black Nursing Home Residents

    Palliative care can be a godsend in the final days of one's life, but new research shows that Black and Hispanic nursing home residents are far less likely to receive it than their white peers are.

    Overall, nursing homes in the Northeast provided the most palliative care, while those in ...

    Black Americans Now More Likely to Die of Drug Overdoses Than Whites

    For two decades, the death rate from opioid overdoses was higher among white Americans than Black Americans. But that changed in 2020, signaling an end to the notion that the overdose crisis is a "white problem."

    Using data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, researchers found that overdose deaths jumped nearly 49% among Black people in the United States from 2019 to...

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