Download our NEW mobile app!!! Quickly request refills or login and manage your prescriptions on the go! Available on both iTunes and Android.

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Research &, Development".

Health News Results - 291

Drug Shows Promise in Easing Dementia-Linked Psychosis

FRIDAY, July 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A drug that eases hallucinations in people with Parkinson's disease may be able to do the same for those with dementia, a new clinical trial finds.

The medication, called Nuplazid (pimavanserin), is already approved in the United States for treating hallucinations and delusions related to Parkinson's.

The new study, publis...

Chinese Man Dies of Rare Virus From Monkeys

A Chinese researcher has died after catching a rare infectious disease called the Monkey B virus, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention officials say.

In March, the 53-year-old veterinarian dissected two dead monkeys as part of his work in a Beijing research institute specializing in nonhuman primate breeding. He developed nausea, vomiting and fever a month later, and died May...

Geneticists Probe Origins of Painful Cluster Headaches

The causes of a type of excruciating headache known as cluster headaches aren't clear, but heredity is known to play a role. Now, genetic factors associated with cluster headaches are under investigation as scientists search for more effective treatments.

Researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden analyzed blood samples from more than 600 people with cluster heada...

A Better Test to Help Spot Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss in older people, and early detection can bring better treatment. Now, researchers in Australia say their experimental genetic test for glaucoma can identify 15 times more people at high risk for the disease compared to a current genetic test.

"Early diagnosis of glaucoma can lead to vision-saving treatment, and genetic information can potential...

Stroke Prevented His Speech, But Brain Implant Brought It Back

THURSDAY, July 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have developed an implant that allowed a man with severe paralysis to "speak" again by translating his brain signals into text.

The achievement is the latest step in "brain-computer interface" (BCI) research.

Scientists have been studying BCI technology for years, with the aim of one day giving people with pa...

Inhaled COVID Vaccine Shows Promise in Animal Trials

Breathing in protection: Scientists say an experimental inhaled COVID-19 vaccine shows promise in animal tests.

"The currently available vaccines against COVID-19 are very successful, but the majority of the world's population is still unvaccinated and there is a critical need for more vaccines that are easy to use and effective at stopping disease and transmission," said study co-leader ...

Global Consortium Finds Genes That Drive Severe COVID-19

Why do some people infected with SARS-CoV-2 have either no or negligible symptoms, while others sicken and die?

Scientists who've pinpointed several genetic markers associated with severe COVID-19 say their findings could provide answers to that important question -- and targets for future treatments.

The investigators spotted 13 locations in human DNA that are strongly associated w...

Scientists Track Spirituality in the Human Brain

Researchers have identified specific brain circuitry that is related to people's sense of spirituality — and it's centered in a brain region linked to pain inhibition, altruism and unconditional love.

The findings add to research seeking to understand the biological basis for human spirituality.

"It is something of a treacherous subject to navigate," said lead researcher Michael F...

New Drug Shows Real Promise Against Celiac Disease

THURSDAY, July 1, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug can prevent intestinal damage caused by celiac disease, an early trial has found — raising hopes that it could become the first medication for the serious digestive disorder.

With celiac disease, the immune system attacks the lining of the small intestine when a genetically susceptible person eats gluten ...

Which Blood Sugar Meds Work Best Against Type 2 Diabetes?

You have type 2 diabetes, and you are already taking an old standby drug, metformin. But you still need help controlling your blood sugar levels. Which medication would be the best?

New research pitted several diabetes drugs against each other and came up with an answer: The diabetes drugs Lantus and Victoza were better at controlling blood sugar over time than Amaryl or Januvia.

"W...

CRISPR Therapy Fights Rare Disease Where Protein Clogs Organs

TUESDAY, June 29, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Early research suggests that CRISPR gene-editing technology may some day lead to dramatic relief for patients struggling with amyloidosis, a rare but serious disease that can trigger organ failure.

"There are many different types of amyloidosis," explained study author Dr. Julian Gillmore, a researcher in medicine with the Cent...

Coming Soon: An Implanted Pacemaker That Dissolves Away After Use

MONDAY, June 28, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers are reporting early success with a temporary heart pacemaker that simply dissolves when it's no longer needed.

So far the work has been limited to animals and human heart tissue studied in the lab. But experts said the early findings are "exciting" and could eventually change the ca...

How Much Do Trees Lower Urban Temperatures?

Could trees be the key to a cool summer in the city?

Yes, claims new research that calculated just how much greenery can bring temperatures down.

"We've long known that the shade of trees and buildings can provide cooling," said study co-author Jean-Michel Guldmann. He is a professor emeritus of city and regional planning at Ohio State University, in Columbus.

"But now we can...

Lilly to Seek FDA Approval for New Alzheimer's Drug

FRIDAY, June 25, 2021 (Healthday News) -- Fresh on the heels of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approval of the controversial Alzheimer's drug Aduhelm, the maker of a second medicine that works in similar fashion said Thursday it hopes to apply for approval of its medication later this year.

Eli Lilly said findings from a mid-stage clinical trial of 272 patients with early Alzheim...

When, Where Was the First Case of COVID-19?

The first case of COVID-19 may have occurred in China weeks earlier than previously thought, a new study claims.

The first officially identified case occurred in early December 2019, but increasing evidence suggests the original case may have emerged earlier.

In this study, British researchers conducted a new analysis and concluded that the first case of COVID-19 arose between early...

Another Pollen Misery: It Might Help Transmit COVID-19

Pollen is tough enough for allergy sufferers, but a new study suggests it also helps spread the new coronavirus and other airborne germs.

Researchers had noticed a connection between COVID-19 infection rates and pollen concentrations on the National Allergy Map of the United States.

That led them to create a computer model of all the pollen-producing parts of a willow tree. They th...

Sickle Cell Plagues Many Black Americans, But There's Hope for Better Treatments

It's been more than six months since Brandy Compton last landed in a hospital emergency room.

That's an amazing medical achievement, brought about by scientific breakthroughs that have been unfortunately overshadowed by the coronavirus pandemic, experts say.

Compton, 31, was born with sickle cell disease, a genetic condition that primarily affects people of African descent.

T...

Animal Study Offers Hope for a Better Herpes Treatment

Aiming to deliver a one-two punch to the herpes virus, animal research on an experimental drug found it tackled active infections and reduced or eliminated the risk of future outbreaks.

Existing treatments, such as Zovirax, Valtrex or Famvir, are only effective at the first task; they can help treat cold sores and genital eruptions once a herpes outbreak occurs. But...

Most Editors at Leading Medical Journals Are White, Study Finds

The vast majority of editors at leading medical journals are white - with few of those influential spots going to Black or Hispanic professionals, a new study finds.

The study comes on the heels of a controversy that prompted the resignation of the editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

It all started in February when Dr. Ed Livingston...

Gene Editing Technique Corrects Sickle Cell Disease in Mice

Researchers are using mice to study a potential new treatment that could help patients who have sickle cell disease, without some of the risks and side effects of existing therapies.

The investigators reported using genetic-based editing on mice to convert a disease-causing hemoglobin gene to a benign variant that would enable healthy blood cell production.

Sickle cell disease (SCD...

'Historic' Decision Expected on U.S. Approval of Alzheimer's Drug

The first drug ever shown to slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease could be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday, but experts say that approval will be surrounded by controversy.

In clinical trials, aducanumab showed a 22% reduction in the development of thinking and memory problems associated with Alzheimer's disease, according to a statement from the Alzheim...

After Editor-in-Chief's Resignation, JAMA Journals Outline Steps to Address Racism

Reacting to recent controversy, the American Medical Association (AMA) announced Thursday a series of steps it will take to promote diversity, equity and inclusion within the medical society and its network of 12 influential journals.

Dr. Howard Bauchner, editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), is stepping down at the end of June, forced out ov...

There's Been a Shift in Who's Funding Alzheimer's Research

The U.S. government and nonprofits are replacing drug companies as the main drivers of Alzheimer's disease research, two new studies show.

The findings are from an analysis of national data by Jeffrey Cummings, a research professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas School of Integrated Health Sciences.

In one study, his team found that the number of Alzheimer's clinical trials ...

Shoulder Pain Can Plague Wheelchair Users, But Their Own Fat Cells Could Be Cure

People with spinal cord injuries can overwork their shoulders as they move about in a wheelchair, and that often leads to chronic shoulder pain.

However, a small study suggests that an injection of the patient's own fat cells can help ease the pain.

The injected cells cushion the joint and may repair it, the researchers explained. Most important, they said that the procedure - calle...

Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Highly Effective in Kids 12 and Older

Moderna's coronavirus vaccine fully protects children aged 12 to 17, the company announced Tuesday.

In a clinical trial that included more than 3,700 young volunteers, there were no cases of symptomatic COVID-19 infection in the two-thirds of participants who received both doses of the vaccine, which translates into an efficacy rate of 100%.

That's the same rate that was reported re...

Man Blind for 40 Years Regains Some Sight Through Gene Therapy

Doctors for the first time have used a form of gene therapy to restore partial vision in a blind person, according to findings announced Monday.

The research team genetically altered retinal ganglion cells to become light-sensitive in a man whose vision was destroyed by retinitis pigmentosa, a genetic disorder that breaks down cells that absorb and convert light into brain signals.

...

Science Studies Most Likely to Be Wrong Are the Most Widely Read

Studies that can't be verified and may be untrue are much more likely to be cited in the media because they tend to be more interesting, researchers report.

They looked at studies in top psychology, economic and nature/science journals and found that only 39% of 100 psychology papers were successfully replicated. The replication rates were 61% for 18 economic studies, and 62% amo...

Robotics Can Give People 3rd Thumb, But How Will Brain React?

If you've ever wished you had an extra hand to accomplish a task, never fear, scientists are working on that. But a new study raises questions about how such technology could affect your brain.

The findings come from ongoing research into a 3D-printed robotic thumb known as "Third Thumb." It's worn on a person's dominant hand, making it capable of feats that normally demand both hands.

New Drug Shows Promise Against Tough-to-Manage Asthma

An experimental injectable drug appears more versatile than existing medications in treating people with different forms of severe, hard-to-control asthma, clinical trial results show.

There are many different types of asthma brought on by many different triggers, and a number of monoclonal antibody medications -- called "biologics" -- have been crafted to target distinct asthma triggers....

Could a Vaccine Against Future Pandemics Be on the Way?

An ambitious new vaccine effort is taking aim at future coronavirus mutations that may threaten global health down the road.

So far, the "pan-coronavirus vaccine" has proven 100% effective in testing among monkeys, investigators reported.

"Large outbreaks of coronaviruses have occurred three times in the last 18 years," explained study author Kevin Saunders, director of researc...

'Mind-Reading' Technology Allows Paralyzed Man to Rapidly Text

A microchip implanted in the brain has allowed a paralyzed man to communicate by text -- at speeds that approach the typical smartphone user.

The achievement is the latest advance in "brain-computer interface" (BCI) systems.

Scientists have been studying BCI technology for years, with the aim of one day giving people with paralysis or limb amputations greater independence in their ...

Humans Started Loving Carbs a Very Long Time Ago

Not only have humans and their ancient ancestors been eating carbs for longer than was realized, but a new study finds these starchy foods may actually have played a part in the growth of the human brain.

A new study researching the history of the human oral microbiome found that Neanderthals and ancient humans adapted to eating starchy foods as far back as 100,000 years ago, which is mu...

Not Just About Antibodies: Why mRNA COVID Vaccines May Shield From Variants

Two widely used COVID-19 vaccines -- Pfizer and Moderna -- will likely remain powerfully protective against developing serious illness even if coronavirus variants somehow manage to infect vaccinated patients, new research suggests.

Both vaccines are based on messenger RNA (mRNA) technology. And investigators say that, at least in theory, such technology can deploy multiple levels of defe...

Researchers Seek Antiviral Pill That Would Ease COVID Severity

While COVID-19 research efforts must now shift toward the development of a pill that can prevent serious illness in the recently infected, experts say.

"We need a pill that can keep people out of the hospital, and the time to develop that is right now," Dr. Rajesh Gandhi said during a Thursday media briefing by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. He is director of HIV Clinical Ser...

Heat Waves Topping 132 Degrees F Likely in Middle East Without Action on Climate Change

The Middle East and North Africa are already among the hottest spots on the planet, but new research warns that if nothing is done to slow climate change there will be life-threatening heat waves with temperatures of 132 Fahrenheit or higher in those regions.

"Our results for a business-as-usual pathway indicate that, especially in the second half of this century, unprecedented super- an...

Race Against Time: Stricken With ALS, She's Seeking Access to Experimental Drug

Like many proud moms, Lisa Stockman-Mauriello of Summit, N.J., is looking forward to exciting milestones in lives of her three sons over the coming months: One will graduate college, one will enter college, and the third will begin high school.

But unlike other moms, it's not guaranteed that she'll be there to experience them.

Lisa, 51, has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a di...

Is a Cheap 'Universal' Coronavirus Vaccine on the Way?

An experimental COVID-19 vaccine could potentially provide universal protection against future COVID variants as well as other coronaviruses -- maybe even the ones responsible for the common cold. And it's dirt cheap -- less than $1 a dose, researchers say.

The vaccine targets a part of the COVID virus' spike protein that appears to be highly resistant to mutation and is common across nea...

Common MS Meds Might Be Less Effective in Black Patients

Black people experience more severe courses of multiple sclerosis (MS), and now new research suggests that drugs commonly used to treat this disease may not work as well or for as long in these folks.

"I was amazed," said study researcher Dr. Gregg Silverman, a professor of medicine at NYU Langone Health in New York City. In a study of two drugs, "there was a dramatic and significant diff...

U.K. Variant Won't Trigger More Severe COVID, Studies Find

Two new studies out of Britain find that although the now-dominant "U.K. variant" of the new coronavirus does spread more quickly, it does not appear to lead to more severe disease in those made ill.

The findings should help allay fears that more patients will die after infection with the variant, officially labeled B.1.1.7.

Scientists published the findings online April 12 in two

Bright Side: Sunnier Areas Have Lower COVID-19 Death Rates

COVID-19 might have a tough new foe: The sun.

New research shows that sunnier regions of the United States have lower COVID-19 death rates than cloudier areas, suggesting that the sun's UV rays might somehow provide some protection against the disease.

The effect is not due to better uptake of the healthy "sunshine vitamin," vitamin D, noted the Scottish research team led by Richard...

Pandemic Has Put Many Clinical Trials on Hold

Fewer clinical trials are being completed during the pandemic, which experts say could affect medical research for decades to come.

Previously, it was reported that more than 80% of clinical trials were suspended between March 1 and April 26, 2020, with the pandemic cited as the main reason.

In this study, researchers at Penn State College of Medicine examined more than 117,000 tria...

The Future of Cancer for Americans

At first glance, it appears that little will change between now and 2040 when it comes to the types of cancers that people develop and that kill them, a new forecast shows.

Breast, melanoma, lung and colon cancers are expected to be the most common types of cancers in the United States, and patients die most often from lung, pancreatic, liver and colorectal cancers, according to the lates...

Moderna COVID Vaccine Offers Protection for at Least 6 Months: Study

There's good news for the millions of Americans who've already received a dose or two of Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine: New research shows the vaccine should protect against illness for at least six months.

The new study tracked 33 participants in the trials that led to the vaccine's approval. Six months after having received their second vaccine dose, "antibody activity remained high in al...

Low Risk That Scientists Can Pass Coronavirus to North American Bats

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientists thought twice about studying North American bats in their winter habitats. But they've now determined that the risk of humans passing the coronavirus to bats under these conditions was low.

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) led the study. It found the risk to be one in 1,000 with no protective measures and one in 3,333 with proper use of per...

If You've Had COVID, One Vaccine Jab Will Do: Study

A new U.S. study offers more evidence that a single dose of a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine may provide enough protection to people who've previously been infected with the coronavirus.

"Our findings extend those from smaller studies reported elsewhere and support a potential strategy of providing a single dose of vaccine to persons with a confirmed prior history of coronavirus infection, al...

Can Vaccinations Stop COVID Transmission? College Study Aims to Find Out

It's the question everyone wants answered because reopening the world depends on it: Can coronavirus vaccines stop transmission of the virus?

Now, 21 universities across the United States are teaming up to find out.

The project, called Prevent COVID U, was started by the COVID-19 Prevention Network housed at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle.

The study inc...

'Zombie Genes' Spur Some Brain Cells to Grow Even After Death

When people die some cells in their brains go on for hours, even getting more active and growing to gargantuan proportions, new research shows.

Awareness of this activity, spurred on by "zombie genes," could affect research into diseases that affect the brain.

For the study, researchers analyzed gene expression using fresh brain tissue collected during routine surgery and found that...

A Noninvasive Alternative for Painful Arthritic Knees

For those who suffer painful arthritis in their aging knees, new research suggests a noninvasive treatment might deliver lasting relief.

Called genicular artery embolization, the roughly two-hour catheter treatment involves a once-and-done injection of tiny hydrogel particles into arterial pathways in the knee joint. The goal: To decrease overall blood flow in the joint, and thereby marke...

Coming Soon: Once-a-Week Insulin Injections?

Daily insulin jabs can be the bane of existence for people who live with type 2 diabetes, but an investigational once-weekly insulin shot may be a game changer for these folks.

While the research is still in its early stages, the new drug called basal insulin Fc (BIF) is given once a week and appears to be just as effective at controlling blood sugar (glucose) as insulin degludec, the gol...

Disappointment and Hope From Two HIV Prevention Trials

An antibody infusion being tested for preventing HIV does not seem to thwart most infections -- but its success against certain strains of the virus suggests researchers are on the right track.

That's the takeaway from a clinical trial that put the antibody, called VRC01, to the test in 2,700 people at high risk of contracting HIV.

Researchers found that infusions of the antibody ev...