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Results for search "Therapy &, Procedures: Misc.".

Health News Results - 443

Fertility Drugs Won't Raise Breast Cancer Risk

Women battling infertility are often given medications to help them conceive, and potential side effects are always a concern. Now, research suggests use of the drugs won't raise a woman's odds for breast cancer.

Researchers at King's College London in the United Kingdom analyzed studies from 1990 to January 2020 that included 1.8 million women of all reproductive ages who underwent ferti...

More Than Half of People With Asthma Aren't Seeing a Specialist

Among Americans with severe asthma, less than half see a specialist to manage their condition, new research shows.

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute recommends patients with severe asthma be referred to a specialist for evaluation and care.

To find out how many people with severe asthma see a specialist, researchers examined insurance data from more than 54,000 pati...

Many 'High Priority' Patients Aren't Getting Put on Kidney Transplant Lists

FRIDAY, June 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Many Americans who stand to benefit most from a kidney transplant may be missing a key window of opportunity, a new study finds.

The study focused on kidney failure patients who would be expected to live many years after receiving a kidney transplant. That generally includes relatively younger people without other major medical ...

Survivors' Plasma Helps Blood Cancer Patients Battle COVID-19

Giving COVID-19 survivors' blood plasma to blood cancer patients hospitalized with COVID-19 significantly improves their chances of survival, a new study finds.

"These results suggest that convalescent plasma may not only help COVID-19 patients with blood cancers whose immune systems are compromised, it may also help patients with other illnesses who have weakened antibody responses to th...

What Works Best to Ease Migraines?

A new research review offers good news for migraine sufferers: There are more pain-relieving options than ever.

In an analysis of over 100 published studies, researchers found that several drug classes showed good evidence they ease the pain of a migraine-in-progress.

Some of those medications have only become available in the past few years, opening up new options for migraine suff...

Many U.S. Seniors May Need Better Knee Arthritis Care

Just a fraction of older Americans with arthritic knees try physical therapy, pain-relieving injections or other more conservative measures before undergoing knee replacement surgery, new research shows.

And this may be driven by what type of doctor they see to treat their achy knees, as well as where they live, the study findings suggest.

Knee osteoarthritis occurs when the cartila...

'Laughing Gas' Shows Promise Against Tough-to-Treat Depression

When antidepressants fail to rein in hard-to-treat depression, the common anesthetic most know as "laughing gas" might be a safe and effective alternative, new research suggests.

The finding follows work with 28 patients struggling with "treatment-resistant major depression," a severe condition that investigators say affects about one-third of all patients - an estimated 17 million Americ...

A Real Headache: Racism Plays Role in Migraine Care

The color of your skin may very well determine how your headache gets treated, a new study warns.

The same percentage of white, Black and Hispanic Americans - about 15% - suffer from severe headaches and/or migraines, the investigators noted.

But the current analysis, conducted by 16 headache disorder experts, found that Black men are far less likely to receive headache treatment; t...

Newly Approved Drug Fights Lung Cancer Tied to Certain Genes

A newly approved lung cancer drug shows promise in improving survival in patients whose tumors carry a common and tough-to-treat genetic mutation, researchers say.

Sotorasib - brand name Lumakras - was approved May 28 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a targeted therapy for non-small cell lung cancer patients with tumors that express the G12C mutation in the KRAS gene, ...

Drug Lynparza Could Help Fight Some Early-Stage Breast Cancers

A twice-daily pill can dramatically reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence in women who are genetically prone to the disease, researchers report.

The pill - olaparib (Lynparza) - works by blocking a natural enzyme called PARP that normally fixes DNA damage in healthy cells, but in these women actually promotes the growth of cancerous cells.

Early high-risk breast cancer patient...

Experimental Treatment Offers New Hope Against Lupus

An experimental antibody therapy may help ease skin symptoms from the autoimmune disease lupus, a small preliminary trial suggests.

Researchers found that a higher-dose version of the drug spurred a "clinically meaningful" symptom improvement for 87% of patients after one month.

But they also stressed that the findings are based on a small "phase 1" trial - a type of study designed ...

Can Flotation Tanks Ease Chronic Pain?

As a means of providing long-term relief from chronic pain, flotation tanks simply don't hold water, new research reveals.

Nearly 100 people plagued by longstanding pain underwent "flotation restricted environmental stimulation therapy" (REST), and the results were disappointing, at least over the long term, German researchers found.

The treatment involves floating inside a soundpro...

Shoulder Pain Can Plague Wheelchair Users, But Their Own Fat Cells Could Be Cure

People with spinal cord injuries can overwork their shoulders as they move about in a wheelchair, and that often leads to chronic shoulder pain.

However, a small study suggests that an injection of the patient's own fat cells can help ease the pain.

The injected cells cushion the joint and may repair it, the researchers explained. Most important, they said that the procedure - calle...

Online Therapy Works for Kids Battling Social Anxiety

Plenty of teens are burdened with a chronic and often paralyzing fear of being harshly judged by others. Unfortunately, many can't get in-person treatment that could help.

But now a team of Swedish researchers says that an entirely online version of a widely used behavioral therapy technique can deliver significant relief to those affected.

The finding could pave the way for easier ...

Sleep Apnea Raises Odds for Severe COVID-19

People suffering from severe obstructive sleep apnea are at a greater risk of catching COVID-19, a new study finds.

But researchers at Kaiser Permanente Southern California also found that the longer patients used a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask while sleeping, the more their COVID-19 risk dropped.

For the study, a team led by pulmonologist Dr. Dennis Hwang collect...

COVID More Lethal for People Living With HIV

Like certain health conditions including cancer, diabetes and high blood pressure, new research shows that having HIV or AIDS increases a person's risk of catching and dying from COVID-19.

For the study, researchers from Penn State College of Medicine assessed data from 22 previous studies of 21 million participants in North America, Africa, Europe and Asia.

The investigators ...

CBD: How Much Pain Relief Is Real and How Much Is Placebo?

CBD is all the rage, and millions of people are turning to it for a host of reasons, including pain relief.

But despite CBD's popularity and widespread use, new research finds it's actual benefits are less clear.

The bottom line? CBD -- and your expectations about whether it will help (the "placebo effect") -- can make pain feel less bothersome, but it doesn't appear to reduce pain ...

1 in 5 U.S. Pharmacies Blocks Access to Key Opioid Addiction Treatment

The Biden administration has eased guidelines for prescribing a crucial addiction treatment drug, just as a new study reveals one in five U.S. pharmacies refuses to dispense the medication, called buprenorphine.

"Buprenorphine is a vital, lifesaving medication for people with opioid use disorder, but improving access has been a problem for a variety of reasons," said the study's senior au...

'Light Therapy' Could Help Brain-Injured Veterans Struggling With PTSD

A popular treatment for the seasonal depression that strikes during dark winter months may also benefit veterans with traumatic brain injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder, a small pilot study suggests.

Results from 16 older veterans found that bright light therapy alongside traditional treatments for these problems improved physical and mental symptoms.

The therapy, in which...

Breast Cancer Over 70: How Much Treatment Is Enough?

Many women older than 70 can safely receive fewer treatments for early-stage breast cancer, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that adding lymph node removal or radiation to women's treatment did not seem to cut their risk of a breast cancer recurrence, which was low overall.

The findings, experts said, support existing recommendations to "de-escalate" those procedures for many...

New Hope Against a Rare but Incurable Eye Cancer

A cutting-edge experimental drug cuts nearly in half the risk of death among patients with a rare but aggressive cancer of the eye, new clinical trial data show.

Tebentafusp has now become the first drug shown to improve overall survival in patients with uveal melanoma, said Dr. Antoni Ribas, immediate past president of the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR), in a

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 20, 2021
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  • Full Page
  • For People With PAD, Exercise Can Be Tough But Rewarding

    Fast-paced walking is painful for the millions of people with peripheral artery disease (PAD). But new research shows that a slower, pain-free pace won't cut it if improvement in mobility is the goal.

    The study included more than 300 of the roughly 8.5 million Americans with PAD. It's a condition in which plaque build-up in arteries slows the flow of blood to the legs.

    "People ...

    Jail Dims Hopes for Recovery for Young People With Mental Illness

    Being jailed puts teens with untreated psychiatric disorders at increased risk for long-term mental health struggles, researchers say.

    "These are not necessarily bad kids, but they have many strikes against them," said study lead author Linda Teplin. "Physical abuse, sexual abuse and neglect are common. These experiences can precipitate depression. Incarceration should be the last resort....

    What Is Endometriosis, and How Is It Treated?

    There's no cure for endometriosis, but women have several treatment options for the painful condition, an expert says.

    With endometriosis, tissue that normally lines the inside of the uterus grows outside of it, where it can reach the fallopian tubes, ovaries, bowel, bladder, diaphragm and, more rarely, other parts of the body. It can reduce fertility.

    Symptoms can include chronic p...

    Why Are Half of U.S. Kids With Mental Health Issues Not Getting Treatment?

    Over half of high-risk children in the United States are not receiving behavioral health services critical to their mental, emotional and physical well-being, new research warns.

    "It's a pretty simple and kind of widely agreed upon finding that there are a lot of at-risk kids, when you look at it in terms of adversities or symptoms, who aren't getting mental health services, behavioral he...

    Drug Shows Promise Against Rare Condition That Stunts Kids' Growth

    A new medication may offer hope to children with achondroplasia, a rare bone growth disorder that causes very short stature coupled with disproportionate limb and trunk size.

    The experimental drug is called vosoritide. By tamping down overactive growth plate signaling that impedes bone growth, the drug seeks to offer affected children the possibility of greater height and improved proport...

    New Thyroid Eye Disease Treatment Could Harm Hearing

    The first drug approved in the United States to treat thyroid eye disease may come with an unwelcome side effect for many: A small, new study finds that up to two-thirds of patients who take the medication experience hearing problems.

    Teprotumumab (Tepezza) was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in January 2020. In two clinical trials conducted before FDA approval of the dr...

    Cancer Survivors May Face Higher Odds for Heart Trouble

    Cancer survivors, especially older ones, have an increased risk of heart disease over the next decade, a new study finds.

    Ohio State University researchers analyzed data from more than 15,000 U.S. adults, aged 40 to 79, who were followed from 2007 to 2016. At the start of the study period, 13% reported a history of cancer but none had a history of heart disease.

    Over the next decade...

    Lockdowns Are Putting People With Eating Disorders in Crisis

    At Eating Recovery Center, which offers treatment and services for people who have eating disorders, intensive outpatient and partial hospitalization programs were switched to virtual when the pandemic began.

    But that didn't sit well with people who were working on their recovery.

    "Our patients said, 'You can't do this. This is not enough support for us,'" said Ellen Astrachan-Fletc...

    On-the-Road Help: 'Mobile Stroke Units' Are Saving People's Lives

    Time is never more precious than in the minutes after a stroke. Now, research is confirming that a "mobile stroke unit" can rush aid to patients quickly, potentially saving lives.

    "Patients who are treated early benefit from a complete reversal of stroke symptoms and avoidance of disability," said lead study author Dr. James Grotta. He is director of stroke research at the Clinical Instit...

    Certain HIV Meds Have Patients Packing on Pounds

    A commonly prescribed component of the life-saving antiretroviral drug cocktails used to treat HIV may trigger weight gain, new research warns.

    The concern stems from tracking patients taking antiretroviral therapy (ART). Since the mid-1990s, the therapy has relied on various drug combinations to essentially outwit HIV, controlling viral loads and turning a once-deadly infection into a ma...

    Minutes Mean Months: Getting Stroke Care Fast Is Vital, Study Confirms

    For someone suffering a severe stroke, every 10 minutes that goes by before treatment starts in the emergency room may cost eight weeks of a healthy life, Canadian researchers report.

    In fact, delays in the hospital may have worse consequences for recovery than delays in getting to the hospital, they noted.

    "Our study confirmed that any delay in delivering appropriate stroke treatme...

    Could Low-Dose Aspirin Help Shield You From COVID-19?

    It's already being taken by millions to help ward off heart issues, and now preliminary research hints that daily low-dose aspirin might also cut your odds of contracting COVID-19.

    As the Israeli research team noted, aspirin is an anti-inflammatory and previous studies have shown that it may help the immune system combat some viral infections. According to the researchers, aspirin was wid...

    Could a Drug Prevent Type 1 Diabetes in Those at Risk?

    Just two weeks of treatment with an experimental drug can delay the onset of type 1 diabetes by several years, researchers report.

    The drug, called teplizumab, is already under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration based on earlier evidence of its effectiveness.

    If it gets the green light, it would become the first drug approved for delaying type 1 diabetes in high-risk pe...

    No Sense of Smell After COVID? Therapies Can Help Bring It Back

    So, you had COVID-19 a few months back and you still can't smell that first steaming cup of coffee in the morning. Is there anything you can do to hasten the return of that vital sense?

    Experts say there is, including "physical therapy" for your nose.

    "In most cases, smell loss is temporary, but it can take months or even years to recover," said researcher Dr. Tran Locke. She's an a...

    Opioid Addiction Relapse May Be Different for Men, Women

    Who is more likely to relapse after opioid addiction treatment -- women or men?

    A new study that followed 1,100 recovering opioid users reveals that their risks are different.

    The researchers followed the men and women for one year after treatment at more than 100 substance-use treatment facilities across the United States. During that time, 55% of the women and 51.5% of the men use...

    Does an Arthritis Drug Help Patients Battling Severe COVID? It Depends on the Study

    Two new studies suggest that the jury is still out on whether the arthritis drug tocilizumab helps those with severe COVID-19.

    Both reports were published recently in the New England Journal of Medicine. The first, from scientists at the University of California, San Diego, found tocilizumab didn't improve outcomes or reduce the risk of death in patients with severe COVID-19 pneu...

    Could ADHD Raise Odds for More Serious Psychiatric Ills?

    As if attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) isn't already tough on a child, new research suggests the condition might also raise the odds for a psychotic disorder later in life.

    But parents should not panic.

    "I would say that this finding should not be an alarm for parents and people who have ADHD, because the absolute risk for psychotic disorders remains low," sa...

    Stem Cell Injections Show Early Promise Against Spinal Cord Injuries

    Spinal cord injuries can be devastating to the more than 17,000 Americans who suffer them each year. But many patients may have new reason for hope: Early research suggests infusions of stem cells could help them regain lost sensation and movement.

    These improvements may occur within days or weeks of receiving the stem cell therapy, and can last at least six months, according to the small...

    Rheumatoid Arthritis Meds May Help Fight Severe COVID-19

    Rheumatoid arthritis drugs may save lives of patients hospitalized with severe cases of COVID-19, according to a groundbreaking clinical trial.

    The findings, first announced in January, have now been peer-reviewed and published in a major medical journal.

    "We are delighted that our full results are now published after peer review. This confirms the robustness of our findings, that t...

    Pandemic Putting Added Strain on Parents of Kids With Cancer

    A cancer diagnosis for your child is devastating enough, but new research shows the coronavirus pandemic has made the battle even harder for many families.

    "Parents and caregivers of children who have cancer are already under tremendous stress," said study author Kyle Walsh, an associate professor in the department of neurosurgery at Duke University, in Durham, N.C. "And while the pandemi...

    COVID No More Deadly for People With Asthma, Large Study Shows

    During the pandemic, people with asthma have worried that their respiratory condition might raise their risk of severe illness or death from COVID-19, but new research findings should calm their fears.

    After analyzing data from 57 studies that included a total of over 587,000 people, scientists discovered that rates of asthma among people with COVID-19 were similar to rates in the general...

    New Variants Mean COVID Vaccines, Tests May Need Tweaking: FDA

    The emergence of new SARS-CoV-2 variants could require a quick pivot on the part of pharmaceutical and medical device companies, to help stay one step ahead of COVID-19.

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued guidelines Monday encouraging drug and test developers to pay attention to new coronavirus variants and be prepared to make that pivot if necessary.

    The guidance provides...

    New Hope for Better Treatments Against Macular Degeneration

    A number of new treatments for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a progressive eye disease, are under development. AMD is a leading cause of vision loss in older people.

    About 11 million Americans have AMD, which affects part of the eye that allows you to see fine detail. There are two types: wet and dry. Wet AMD is treated with eye injections every month or two, and dry AMD with an...

    Insight Into Why a Prostate Cancer Therapy Works Better for Black Men

    Higher levels of a certain type of immune cell may explain why immunotherapy for prostate cancer is more effective in Black men than in white men, researchers say.

    The finding could lead to immunotherapy-based precision treatment for localized aggressive and advanced prostate cancer in all races.

    For the study, the researchers analyzed 1,300 prostate tumor samples and found that, on...

    New Rabies Prevention Treatment Also Works in Kids: Study

    Getting bitten by a dog or wild animal is frightening, especially for kids, but a new study may help relieve some of the worry about catching rabies.

    The rabies prevention treatment KEDRAB is safe and effective for patients 17 and younger, a groundbreaking pediatric clinical trial has shown.

    The trial included 30 kids with suspected or confirmed rabies exposure who were treated with...

    Even Low-Intensity Exercise Can Help During Cancer Treatments

    If you have cancer and you're trying to exercise to boost your health, new research suggests you don't have to knock yourself out during your workout.

    Light exercise is just as beneficial as more demanding workouts for cancer patients, the researchers found.

    Previous research has shown that physical activity can improve cancer patients' physical and mental health, reduce fatigue and...

    Interferon Shot Might Keep COVID-19 Patients Out of the Hospital

    An experimental antiviral drug known as peginterferon lambda can speed up COVID-19 patients' ability to shed the virus and recover, scientists report.

    "One of the important things about this treatment that's different from the other things that have been studied for COVID-19 is that this is working on the person, not on the virus. So it doesn't depend at all on the strain or the sequence ...

    Specialist Care for Alzheimer's Is Tough to Find for Poorer, Rural Americans

    Although Alzheimer's disease is a devastating diagnosis that is better delivered earlier rather than later, new research suggests poor patients living in rural areas may not have access to the specialists who could spot the first signs of memory declines.

    The team from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., led by Sayeh Nikpay, now an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota...

    Drug Combo May Boost Survival for Tough-to-Treat Liver Cancers

    A new drug combination for advanced liver cancer can extend people's lives substantially more than the long-standing drug of choice, new study findings confirm.

    The treatment involves two drugs approved to fight various cancers: bevacizumab (Avastin) and atezolizumab (Tecentriq). Avastin, an intravenous (IV) drug, starves tumors by preventing new blood vessel growth.

    Tecentriq, also...