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Results for search "Depression".

11 Jun

'Laughing Gas' Shows Promise Against Tough-to-Treat Depression

A single treatment using low-dose nitrous oxide rapidly relieves symptoms of severe depression, researchers say.

18 Mar

More Than 50% Of Covid-19 Survivors Suffer Depression, New Study Finds

Young, male patients with severe COVID-19 are most at risk for major depressive disorder, researchers say

25 Feb

Irregular Sleep Patterns Tied To Bad Moods and Depression

Variable wake-up and sleep times can increase a person's risk of depression symptoms over time, researchers say.

Health News Results - 298

Depression During Menopause: How to Spot It and Treat It

Emotional changes in the run-up to menopause can sometimes lead to depression.

It can be important to see a doctor to help determine whether you're just feeling stressed or "blue" -- or whether you might have clinical or major depression, a condition associated with a chemical imbalance in the brain.

Changing hormones during perimenopause -- the time when a woman's body is preparing...

Common Eye Conditions Tied to Higher Risk for Dementia

Diseases that can rob you of vision as you age also appear to be tied to an increased risk for dementia, a new study finds.

Specifically, age-related macular degeneration, cataracts and diabetes-related eye disease were linked with a higher likelihood of dementia, researchers in China said. However, one other common eye ailment, glaucoma, was not linked to dementia risk.

The new st...

Could You Help Prevent a Suicide? Know the Warning Signs

Knowing the warning signs of suicide can save a life, experts say.

Suicide is the 10th leading overall cause of death in the United States, and number two among people between the ages of 10 and 34.

Most suicides result from depression. It can cause someone to feel worthless, hopeless and a burden on others, making suicide falsely appear to be a solution, according to the

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  • September 12, 2021
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  • Getting Your First COVID Shot Can Boost Mental Health: Study

    When you got your first COVID-19 jab, did you breathe a sigh of relief? If so, you're not alone.

    U.S. adults who got the vaccine between December 2020 and March 2021 experienced a 4% reduction in their risk of being mildly depressed and a 15% drop in their risk of severe depression, researchers reported Sept. 8 in the journal PLOS ONE.

    "People who got vaccinated experienced a reduct...

    Eczema Can Take Toll on Child's Mental Health

    Eczema doesn't just irritate kids' skin. The often disfiguring condition may also be tied to depression, anxiety and sleep difficulties, new research warns.

    A study of more than 11,000 British children and teens found that those with severe eczema were twice as likely to become clinically depressed as eczema-free kids.

    "Eczema is an itchy red skin disease," said study author D...

    Depression Can Be a Killer for People With MS

    Depression and multiple sclerosis (MS) tend to travel together, new research finds, and when they do the chances of dying during the next decade can be up to five times greater than it is for those with neither condition.

    Exactly why the combination is so lethal is not fully understood, but several factors may be at play, explained study author Dr. Raffaele Palladino, a research associate...

    Cluster of Symptoms Common in People First Diagnosed With MS

    A number of symptoms are common among people who are newly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a patient survey shows.

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an incurable disease in which the nerves' protective layers are damaged, resulting in progressive disability.

    Feel Guilty About 'Useless' Leisure Time? Your Mental Health Might Suffer

    Struggling to decide whether to spend another hour at the office or take a late afternoon stroll?

    Put on your walking shoes.

    Making leisure time a priority is good for your mental health. For many, though, especially folks who prize productivity above all, it's a hard sell, a new study finds.

    "There is plenty of research which suggests that leisure has mental health benefits ...

    Lyme Disease Can Wreak Havoc on Mental Health

    Lyme disease can exact a significant mental toll as well as a physical one on its sufferers, a new study confirms.

    Patients hospitalized for Lyme disease had a 28% higher incidence of mental disorders and were twice as likely to attempt suicide than people without Lyme, researchers report.

    "These findings highlight the need for greater awareness in the medical community that patien...

    Ketamine Appears Safe as Therapy for Tough-to-Treat Depression

    The anesthesia drug ketamine and a related medicine called esketamine appear to be safe for tough-to-treat depression, researchers report.

    A number of studies have suggested that low doses of ketamine, which is also abused as a club drug under monikers that include "K" and "Special K," provide rapid antidepressant effects, typically improving mood within 24 hours to seven days.

    Sim...

    Pandemic Has Depression, Anxiety Rates Among Youth Climbing Worldwide

    If you think the pandemic hasn't taken a toll on the mental health of young people, ponder these two facts from a new review: one in four are suffering from depression, while one in five are struggling with anxiety.

    "Being socially isolated, kept away from their friends, their school routines and extracurricular activities during the pandemic has proven to be difficult on youth," said lea...

    Gun Sales in Homes With Teens Rose During Pandemic

    U.S. gun sales increased early in the COVID-19 pandemic, and many of those firearms ended up in homes with teens, researchers say.

    "This finding is concerning because we know that the single biggest risk factor for adolescent firearm injuries is access to an unsecured firearm," said study co-author Dr. Patrick Carter. He is co-director of the Institute for Firearm Injury Prevention at the...

    The Bigger the City, the Lower the Depression Rates?

    Americans living in big cities have relatively low rates of depression, despite the hustle and bustle -- or maybe because of it, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that compared with smaller U.S. cities, big urban hubs generally had lower rates of depressionamong residents. And they think the pattern can be explained, in part, by the wide range of social interactions that busy cities...

    The Heat Is On: Staying Safe When Temperatures Soar

    Midsummer heat and high humidity aren't just uncomfortable -- they're a combo that can cause serious illness and even death.

    "Whenever you walk or do outdoor activity, take a friend with you who can help you if you run into trouble," Dr. Eleanor Dunham advised. She's an emergency medicine doctor at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pa.

    Babies and seniors...

    Worry, Depression, Burnout: Survey Finds College Students Stressed as Fall Term Nears

    Like many of her peers, Ohio State University engineering student Mary Trabue spent much of the pandemic taking classes online. And she was struggling.

    "I don't know what was wrong, but I just felt tired all the time because I wasn't sleeping," she said. "And I knew I couldn't continue down that path."

    Whether a question of COVID-related depression, anxiety, burnout or all of t...

    How Your Kid's Education Could Make You Healthier

    If you're a parent, here's another reason to encourage your kids to get a good education: Children's educational successes or failures can impact their parent's physical and mental health, new research suggests.

    For the study, researchers at the University at Buffalo in New York analyzed data from the ongoing U.S. National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health that began in 199...

    Shock Therapy Safe, Effective for Tough-to-Treat Depression

    "Shock" therapy often helps lift severe depression, but fear and stigma can deter patients from getting it. Now a large new study is confirming the treatment's safety.

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), as it's medically known, has been around for decades. For almost as long, it's been seen in a bad light -- fueled by disturbing media portrayals like those in the 1975 film "One Flew Over th...

    More Than a Quarter of Long COVID Patients Still Not Recovered After 6 Months

    How long can some COVID symptoms linger? New research suggests that more than a quarter of adults who had COVID-19 in 2020 weren't fully recovered six to eight months later.

    There's growing evidence that COVID-19 can cause long-term physical and mental health problems. These cases -- called long-haul COVID -- are a growing issue for health care systems.

    This study included 431 peopl...

    Autism & Drinking, Drug Abuse Can Be Dangerous Mix

    Teens and adults with autism may be less likely than others to use drugs and alcohol, but new research finds those who do are nearly nine times more likely to use these substances to mask symptoms, including those related to autism.

    This is known as camouflaging, and it has been linked to mental health issues and increased risk for suicide among people with autism.

    "Seeing such star...

    Depression Plagues Many Coal Miners With Black Lung Disease

    Mental health problems and thoughts of suicide are common among U.S. coal miners with black lung disease, a new study finds.

    Black lung is a progressive illness caused by inhaling toxic coal and rock dust in coal mines. There are few treatment options.

    "Although coal mining is on the decline, the rates of black lung in Southwest Virginia continue to increase. Coal miners in Central ...

    Urinary Incontinence Can Affect a Woman's Mental Health

    Millions of women are plagued by the daily disruptions of urinary incontinence, and new research suggests it might also be harming their mental health.

    For the study, researchers analyzed data from 10,000 adult women who took part in a Portuguese Health Ministry survey conducted every five years. Overall, one in 10 reported having urinary incontinence, but the rate was four in 10 among wo...

    1 in 4 People With Anxiety, Depression Couldn't Get Care During Pandemic

    In the middle of a pandemic that sent many Americans into bouts of emotional distress, one-quarter of them couldn't get counseling when they needed it the most, new research shows.

    "Social isolation, COVID-related anxiety, disruptions in normal routines, job loss and food insecurity have led to a surge in mental illness during the pandemic," explained lead author Dr. Jason Nagata, an assi...

    People With HIV Have Much Higher Risk for Suicide

    Since the advent of AIDS, major advancements in treating HIV infection has turned what used to be a death sentence into a manageable chronic condition.

    But new research warns that many people living with HIV/AIDS still face a dramatically higher risk for suicide.

    The finding came from a review of 40 studies that involved a total of roughly 185,000 adults with HIV or AIDS (PLWHA -- P...

    Body's 'Signals' May Feel Different in People With Anorexia, Depression

    The brain interprets physical signals differently in people with depression, anorexia and some other mental health disorders, new research shows.

    British scientists examined "interoception" -- the brain's ability to sense internal conditions in the body -- in 626 patients with mental health disorders and a control group of 610 people without mental illness.

    "Interoception is somethi...

    Marijuana Use Tied to Higher Odds for Thoughts of Suicide

    Young adults who use marijuana appear to have an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and attempted suicide, according to a new study from the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

    In fact, the risk that someone between 18 and 34 will think about, plan for or attempt suicide increases with the amount of marijuana they use, according to results published June 22 in the journal J...

    Could Fish Oil Supplements Help Fight Depression?

    Fish oil supplements are often touted as good for your heart health, but a new study finds they may also help fight depression.

    "Using a combination of laboratory and patient research, our study has provided exciting new insight into how omega-3 fatty acids bring about anti-inflammatory effects that improve depression," said lead author Alessandra Borsini, a postdoctoral neuroscientist at...

    Dads of 'Preemie' Babies Can Be Hit by Depression

    Postpartum depression strikes fathers of premature babies more often than previously thought, and it can linger longer in fathers than in mothers, a new study finds.

    The researchers screened for depression in 431 parents of premature infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and identified depression symptoms in 33% of mothers and 17% of fathers.

    After the babies were brough...

    Treating Teachers' Depression Could Boost Young Students' Grades: Study

    When depression strikes teachers, they can suffer mightily, but a new study suggests their students' ability to learn might also be harmed.

    Researchers found a correlation between teachers' depressive symptoms and math skills in early learners enrolled in Head Start programs. Head Start is a U.S. government program providing early education, nutrition, health and parent support for low-in...

    'Laughing Gas' Shows Promise Against Tough-to-Treat Depression

    When antidepressants fail to rein in hard-to-treat depression, the common anesthetic most know as "laughing gas" might be a safe and effective alternative, new research suggests.

    The finding follows work with 28 patients struggling with "treatment-resistant major depression," a severe condition that investigators say affects about one-third of all patients - an estimated 17 million Americ...

    'Early Birds' May Have Extra Buffer Against Depression

    Could getting out of bed just one hour earlier every day lower your risk for depression?

    Yes, claims new research that found an earlier start to the day was tied to a 23% lower risk of developing the mood disorder.

    The study of more than 840,000 people found a link "between earlier sleep patterns and reduced risk of major depressive disorder," said study author Iyas Daghlas.

    T...

    Tennis Star Naomi Osaka's 'Time Out' Highlights Common, Crippling Mental Health Issue

    On Tuesday, tennis star Naomi Osaka announced her withdrawal from the French Open. The reason: An ongoing battle with depression and anxiety.

    As the world's No. 2 woman's tennis player and a four-time Grand Slam tournament winner at the age of just 23, many fans may have been taken aback that someone so young and successful might nonetheless battle with mental health issues.

    Bu...

    Massive Gene Study Probes Origins of Depression

    Researchers who pinpointed 178 gene variants linked to major depression say their findings could improve diagnosis and treatment of a disorder that affects 1 in 5 people.

    The study draws on a huge database, analyzing the genetic and health records of 1.2 million people from three databanks in the United States, the U.K. and Finland, and another databank from the consumer genetics company ...

    In One U.S. School District, Nearly 10% of Students Identify as 'Gender-Diverse'

    Teens may be much more diverse in their gender identities than widely thought, a new study suggests.

    In a survey of nearly 3,200 high school students in one U.S. school district, researchers found that almost 10% were "gender-diverse." That meant they identified as a gender other than the sex on their birth certificate.

    Often, those kids identified as transgender, but many considere...

    Major Gene Study Looks at Origins of Bipolar Disorder

    Scientists report they have pinpointed 64 regions in the DNA of humans that increase a person's risk of bipolar disorder, more than twice the number previously identified.

    The researchers, who called this the largest investigation of bipolar disorder to date, also discovered overlap in the genetic roots of bipolar disorder and other psychiatric disorders. They said it adds to evidence tha...

    Depression Even More Common With Heart Failure Than Cancer

    People with heart failure are 20% more likely than those with cancer to develop depression within five years of their diagnosis, a new study finds.

    Nearly 1 in 4 patients with heart failure are depressed or anxious, according to the German researchers.

    "The treatment of mental illnesses in cancer patients -- psycho-oncology -- is long-established, but similar services for heart pati...

    Feeling Down? Support Via Social Media May Not Be Enough

    Looking for a morale boost or some solid encouragement? If so, socializing the old-fashioned way -- live and in-person -- will likely do more to lift your spirits than online interactions, new research suggests.

    It's the key takeaway from a survey of more than 400 college undergraduate students.

    "We wanted to see if the social support provided over social media was associated with b...

    Lockdown Loneliness Making Things Even Tougher for Cancer Patients

    Fighting cancer can be a lonely battle, and new research shows that the coronavirus pandemic has made the experience even more isolating.

    Studies conducted before the pandemic found that 32% to 47% of cancer patients were lonely, but in late May of 2020 roughly 53% of 606 cancer patients reported loneliness.

    Those who were lonely had higher rates of social isolation and more severe ...

    State of Mind Matters for Survival After Heart Attack

    Poor mental health after a heart attack may increase young and middle-aged adults' risk of another heart attack or death a few years later, a new study suggests.

    The study included 283 heart attack survivors, aged 18 to 61 with an average age of 51, who completed questionnaires that assessed depression, anxiety, anger, stress and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) within six months of ...

    Time Spent in ICU Linked to Higher Odds for Suicide Later

    Survivors of the intensive care unit (ICU) have a higher risk of self-harm and suicide after discharge than other hospital patients, a Canadian study shows.

    Researchers compared the health records of 423,000 ICU survivors in the province of Ontario with those of with 3 million patients who were hospitalized but not in intensive care between 2009 and 2017.

    Compared to others, ICU sur...

    Stressed, Burned-Out Nurses Make More Medical Errors: Study

    Critical care nurses with poor mental and physical health are more likely to make mistakes, but a more supportive work environment could improve the situation, a new study suggests.

    "It's critically important that we understand some of the root causes that lead to those errors and do everything we can to prevent them," said lead author Bernadette Melnyk, dean of the College of Nursing at ...

    Good Stroke Recovery May Depend on Your ZIP Code: Study

    Stroke recovery tends to be worse among Americans in poorer neighborhoods than those in wealthier neighborhoods, a new study finds.

    "People in less advantaged neighborhoods were more likely to have more disability, lower quality of life and more symptoms of depression than people in more advantaged neighborhoods," said study author Lynda Lisabeth, from the University of Michigan in Ann Ar...

    Nothing to Sniff at: Depression Common for People With COVID-Linked Smell Loss

    Loss of the sense of smell and taste is often an early and enduring symptom of COVID-19. Now, research suggests that for many COVID survivors with long-term sensory loss, it's also depressing.

    In a web-based survey completed by 322 adults with COVID and a sudden change in smell or taste, 56% reported decreased enjoyment in life and 43% admitted feeling depressed after losing their sense ...

    Worry, Depression Can Plague Folks Who Get Implanted Defibrillators

    An implanted heart defibrillator is a life changer in more ways than one. More than one in 10 patients who receive the device also developed anxiety or depression, a new study reveals.

    The findings highlight the need for regular screening of patients who receive an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in order to identity those who may require additional mental health support, acc...

    Pandemic Is Leading to More Depression for Pregnant Women Worldwide: Study

    Depression and other mental health problems have become much more common among pregnant women and new mothers during the COVID-19 pandemic, an international study finds.

    Researchers noted that mental health issues can harm not only a woman's own health but also affect mother-infant bonding and children's health over time.

    "We expected to see an increase in the proportion of pregnant...

    Could Chronic Sinusitis Affect Brain Health?

    As if the headaches and stuffy nose aren't bad enough, chronic sinus trouble often leaves patients foggy-headed and depressed. Now, new research suggests one possible reason why: Sinusitis may trigger changes in brain activity.

    "Chronic sinusitis is incredibly common," said study lead author Dr. Aria Jafari. Upwards of 11% of all Americans are affected, added Jafari, an assistant profess...

    Pandemic Stress Keeps Many From Exercising

    Exercise can provide a much-needed mental health boost during the COVID-19 pandemic. But stress and anxiety may hold you back, new research suggests.

    According to a survey by researchers at McMaster University in Canada, some people may need mental health support to exercise during the pandemic.

    "Maintaining a regular exercise program is difficult at the best of times, and the cond...

    Americans Still Avoiding ERs in Pandemic, But Uptick Seen in Mental Health Crises

    While ER visits have stayed below normal levels as the coronavirus pandemic continues, the number of people showing up in the emergency department with mental woes is increasing, new federal government data shows.

    Between March 29 and April 25, 2020, visits to emergency departments dropped 42%, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found. Although the number...

    'Magic Mushroom' Hallucinogen as Good as Antidepressants: Study

    The magic ingredient in "magic mushrooms" may be at least as effective as standard medication for depression, an early clinical trial suggests.

    The study of 59 patients with major depression tested the antidepressant escitalopram (Lexapro) against psilocybin, which is the psychedelic substance in hallucinogenic mushrooms.

    Over six weeks, it appeared that just two doses of psilocybi...

    Nurses Are Dying From Suicide at Higher Rates

    Before the pandemic began, suicide risk was twice as high among female nurses compared with American women as a whole, a new study warns.

    Even within the health care community itself, female nurses were found to be roughly 70% more likely to die by suicide than female doctors.

    Why? Study author Matthew Davis said that for now, "We don't know for certain what forces are directly resp...

    Ovarian Cancer Diagnosis Can Take Big Toll on Women's Mental Health

    Ovarian cancer is a tough diagnosis to cope with, and now a new study finds these patients face a much higher risk of depression and other mental health issues.

    And the emotional anguish exacted a significant toll: The researchers also found it was associated with an increased risk of death during the study period among these women.

    "Mental health issues are important for cancer pat...

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