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Results for search "Psychology / Mental Health: Misc.".

Health News Results - 622

Body's 'Signals' May Feel Different in People With Anorexia, Depression

The brain interprets physical signals differently in people with depression, anorexia and some other mental health disorders, new research shows.

British scientists examined "interoception" -- the brain's ability to sense internal conditions in the body -- in 626 patients with mental health disorders and a control group of 610 people without mental illness.

"Interoception is somethi...

Pandemic May Have Created a 'Baby Bust,' Not Boom

The pandemic not only cost hundreds of thousands of American lives, but it also appears to have triggered a deep drop in births, U.S. health officials reported Wednesday.

Until 2020, the birth rate had been declining about 2% a year, but that rate dropped to 4% with the start of the pandemic, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found.

"When you tak...

Marijuana Use Tied to Higher Odds for Thoughts of Suicide

Young adults who use marijuana appear to have an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and attempted suicide, according to a new study from the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

In fact, the risk that someone between 18 and 34 will think about, plan for or attempt suicide increases with the amount of marijuana they use, according to results published June 22 in the journal J...

When Is Your Very Earliest Memory?

Your earliest memories may stretch back to a younger age than previously thought, new research suggests.

The study found that people can recall back to an average age of 2½ years old, which is a year earlier than suggested by previous studies.

The findings from the 21-year study were recently published online in the journal Memory.

"When one's earliest memory occurs,...

Survey Finds Many Adults Don't Want Kids -- and They're Happy

MONDAY, June 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Marriage and children may be the norm for most Americans, but a new study shows that many people are choosing to remain child-free — and they're happy that way.

The study of 1,000 Michigan adults found that one-quarter had opted not to have kids. And, on average, their life-satisfaction ratings were no different from those of ...

Could Fish Oil Supplements Help Fight Depression?

Fish oil supplements are often touted as good for your heart health, but a new study finds they may also help fight depression.

"Using a combination of laboratory and patient research, our study has provided exciting new insight into how omega-3 fatty acids bring about anti-inflammatory effects that improve depression," said lead author Alessandra Borsini, a postdoctoral neuroscientist at...

Dads of 'Preemie' Babies Can Be Hit by Depression

Postpartum depression strikes fathers of premature babies more often than previously thought, and it can linger longer in fathers than in mothers, a new study finds.

The researchers screened for depression in 431 parents of premature infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and identified depression symptoms in 33% of mothers and 17% of fathers.

After the babies were brou...

Even Good Weather Didn't Lift Lockdown Blues: Study

In normal times, a sunny day can lift your mood while a stormy one can darken it, but new British research shows that weather had little effect on people's spirits during the pandemic.

"We know that lockdown restrictions, and the resulting impact on social life and the economy, are linked to at least two major negative public health consequences -- a reduction in physical exercise, both i...

Looking for Love? Young People's Drinking Goes Up When Dating

When young adults are seeking a casual dating relationship, drinking is likely to follow, new research suggests.

Meanwhile, those who are already in a serious relationship are likely to drink less.

The study included more than 700 people in the Seattle area, aged 18 to 25, who filled out surveys every month for two years. The study used a community sample that was not limited to col...

Big Rise in U.S. Teens Identifying As Gay, Bisexual

TUESDAY, June 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- More teens in the United States are reporting their sexual identity as gay, lesbian or bisexual, nationwide surveys show.

Between 2015 and 2019, the percentage of 15- to 17-year-olds who said they identified as "non-heterosexual" rose from 8.3% to 11.7%, according to nationwide surveys by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control an...

Teasing People About Weight Can Help Bring on Eating Disorders

What can make a young person vulnerable to eating disorders? Teasing them about any extra pounds they may carry, researchers say.

"Our findings add to the growing evidence that weight-based mistreatment is not helpful and is often harmful to the health of young people," said study leader Laura Hooper, a PhD student at the University of Minnesota's School of Public Health, in Minneapolis.<...

Big Rise in Suicide Attempts by U.S. Teen Girls During Pandemic

The suicide attempt rate has leapt by as much as half among teenage girls during the coronavirus pandemic, a new government study shows.

Emergency room visits for suspected suicide attempts among girls between the ages of 12 and 17 increased by 26% during summer 2020 and by 50% during winter 2021, compared with the same periods in 2019, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Contro...

It's a Myth That Promiscuous Women Have Low Self-Esteem

The old double standard lives on.

A new study finds that many people still believe -- incorrectly -- that women who engage in casual sex have low self-esteem. And they don't think the same is true of men.

"We were surprised that this stereotype was so widely held," said study first author Jaimie Arona Krems, an assistant professor of psychology at Oklahoma State University. "This st...

'Laughing Gas' Shows Promise Against Tough-to-Treat Depression

When antidepressants fail to rein in hard-to-treat depression, the common anesthetic most know as "laughing gas" might be a safe and effective alternative, new research suggests.

The finding follows work with 28 patients struggling with "treatment-resistant major depression," a severe condition that investigators say affects about one-third of all patients - an estimated 17 million Americ...

'Early Birds' May Have Extra Buffer Against Depression

Could getting out of bed just one hour earlier every day lower your risk for depression?

Yes, claims new research that found an earlier start to the day was tied to a 23% lower risk of developing the mood disorder.

The study of more than 840,000 people found a link "between earlier sleep patterns and reduced risk of major depressive disorder," said study author Iyas Daghlas.

T...

Tennis Star Naomi Osaka's 'Time Out' Highlights Common, Crippling Mental Health Issue

On Tuesday, tennis star Naomi Osaka announced her withdrawal from the French Open. The reason: An ongoing battle with depression and anxiety.

As the world's No. 2 woman's tennis player and a four-time Grand Slam tournament winner at the age of just 23, many fans may have been taken aback that someone so young and successful might nonetheless battle with mental health issues.

Bu...

'Boomerang Kids': When an Adult Child Moves Back Home

It's a scenario fraught with potential conflict: Moving back home as an adult can be tough - on both the grown children and their parents.

But it can also come with opportunities, as long as expectations are established early, say some "boomerang kids" who moved back in with mom and/or dad after reaching adulthood.

A new study interviewed 31 of those young adults, aged 22 to 31, who...

Do You Live in a U.S. Opioid OD Hotspot?

The United States has more than two dozen regional hotspots for opioid overdose deaths, according to researchers who also found a link between fatal overdoses and mental distress.

Ohio, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, West Virginia, Indiana and Tennessee have the highest percentage of opioid overdose deaths, but researchers identified 25 regional overdose clusters nationwide.

The findings h...

Telehealth Is Growing in Use, Acceptance Among Americans: Poll

Many Americans have used telehealth and would turn to it for mental health care, a new online poll shows.

Conducted by the American Psychological Association (APA) from March 26 to April 5, the poll found that 38% had used telehealth to consult with a health professional, up from 31% last fall.

In all, 82% have used it since the start of the pandemic, the poll found. Most consultati...

Massive Gene Study Probes Origins of Depression

Researchers who pinpointed 178 gene variants linked to major depression say their findings could improve diagnosis and treatment of a disorder that affects 1 in 5 people.

The study draws on a huge database, analyzing the genetic and health records of 1.2 million people from three databanks in the United States, the U.K. and Finland, and another databank from the consumer genetics company ...

Having OCD May Triple a Person's Odds for a Stroke

Adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder, a common mental health condition known as OCD, may have more than triple the risk of having a stroke, according to a new report from Taiwanese researchers.

As to why, the study authors aren't sure.

The investigators speculate that other mental health problems suffered by OCD patients - "comorbidities" such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorde...

Narcissist's 'Thin Skin' Can Easily Lead to Aggression

Angry outbursts at the office, threats made in everyday interactions: New research using data from hundreds of studies suggests folks who act out in this way often have narcissistic traits.

They don't even have to rate high in narcissism to be prone to aggressive behavior, the research team found.

"Those who are high in narcissism have thin skins, and they will lash out if they feel...

Just 1 in 10 People With Alcohol Problems Get Treatment

Americans with drinking problems are rarely referred for treatment, even though most say a doctor has asked about their alcohol use, a new study finds.

The study is not the first to uncover low rates of treatment for alcohol use disorders (AUDs) -- the medical term for drinking that interferes with a person's life and well-being.

According to the U.S. National Institutes of Hea...

6 Reasons Bipolar Patients Don't Take Their Meds

Not taking prescribed medications can lead to relapse, hospitalization and increased risk of suicide for people with bipolar disorder, yet many who have this condition do not take their medicines as prescribed.

A new study examines why this happens, finding six key factors that stop people who have bipolar disorder from taking their medications.

The reasons include unpleasant side...

Online Therapy Works for Kids Battling Social Anxiety

Plenty of teens are burdened with a chronic and often paralyzing fear of being harshly judged by others. Unfortunately, many can't get in-person treatment that could help.

But now a team of Swedish researchers says that an entirely online version of a widely used behavioral therapy technique can deliver significant relief to those affected.

The finding could pave the way for easier ...

In One U.S. School District, Nearly 10% of Students Identify as 'Gender-Diverse'

Teens may be much more diverse in their gender identities than widely thought, a new study suggests.

In a survey of nearly 3,200 high school students in one U.S. school district, researchers found that almost 10% were "gender-diverse." That meant they identified as a gender other than the sex on their birth certificate.

Often, those kids identified as transgender, but many considere...

Post-COVID PTSD? Many Find Return to 'Normal' Unsettling

Many Americans felt relief and joy at the announcement last week that fully vaccinated people no longer need to wear masks at many indoor and outdoor locations.

But don't be surprised if those good feelings come tinged with stress or worry: Mental health experts said in a HealthDay Now interview that the COVID-19 pandemic has left a lasting mark on people's psyches, and folks will be stru...

Depression Even More Common With Heart Failure Than Cancer

People with heart failure are 20% more likely than those with cancer to develop depression within five years of their diagnosis, a new study finds.

Nearly 1 in 4 patients with heart failure are depressed or anxious, according to the German researchers.

"The treatment of mental illnesses in cancer patients -- psycho-oncology -- is long-established, but similar services for heart pati...

Can Some Movies Change Your Life? Maybe, Study Finds

FRIDAY, May 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) - A good movie can be more than mere entertainment: It can also help you feel more prepared to tackle life's challenges and be a better person, a new study suggests.

This may be why folks sometimes choose films with difficult subjects or those that make them sad, researchers say.

"Meaningful movies actually help people cope with difficulties in ...

Feel Younger Than Your Age? You Might Live Longer

Can feeling young at heart, or at least younger than your actual age, help older people live healthier, longer lives?

Yes, according to researchers in Germany.

"Individuals who feel younger than they chronologically are seem to benefit from their younger subjective age in various aspects," explained study lead author Markus Wettstein.

Surveying more than 5,000 middle-aged adu...

Feeling Down? Support Via Social Media May Not Be Enough

Looking for a morale boost or some solid encouragement? If so, socializing the old-fashioned way -- live and in-person -- will likely do more to lift your spirits than online interactions, new research suggests.

It's the key takeaway from a survey of more than 400 college undergraduate students.

"We wanted to see if the social support provided over social media was associated with b...

Lockdown Loneliness Making Things Even Tougher for Cancer Patients

Fighting cancer can be a lonely battle, and new research shows that the coronavirus pandemic has made the experience even more isolating.

Studies conducted before the pandemic found that 32% to 47% of cancer patients were lonely, but in late May of 2020 roughly 53% of 606 cancer patients reported loneliness.

Those who were lonely had higher rates of social isolation and more severe ...

State of Mind Matters for Survival After Heart Attack

Poor mental health after a heart attack may increase young and middle-aged adults' risk of another heart attack or death a few years later, a new study suggests.

The study included 283 heart attack survivors, aged 18 to 61 with an average age of 51, who completed questionnaires that assessed depression, anxiety, anger, stress and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) within six months of ...

Time Spent in ICU Linked to Higher Odds for Suicide Later

Survivors of the intensive care unit (ICU) have a higher risk of self-harm and suicide after discharge than other hospital patients, a Canadian study shows.

Researchers compared the health records of 423,000 ICU survivors in the province of Ontario with those of with 3 million patients who were hospitalized but not in intensive care between 2009 and 2017.

Compared to others, ICU sur...

COVID Anxieties Still High for Americans: Poll

Americans' anxiety and concerns about COVID-19 remain high a year into the pandemic, and mental health effects of the health crisis are on the rise, a new survey shows.

Hispanic (73%) and Black Americans (76%) are more anxious about COVID-19 than white people (59%), according to the American Psychiatric Association (APA) online survey of 1,000 U.S. adults. It was conducted March 26 to Apr...

'Ghosts and Guardian Angels': New Insights Into Parkinson's Hallucinations

Parkinson's disease is widely seen as a movement disorder, but it can cause an array of symptoms, including hallucinations. Now a new study has shed light on what is happening in the brain during those disturbances.

The study focused on Parkinson's patients who have so-called presence hallucinations -- a false feeling that another person is nearby.

Researchers found that they were a...

Stressed, Burned-Out Nurses Make More Medical Errors: Study

Critical care nurses with poor mental and physical health are more likely to make mistakes, but a more supportive work environment could improve the situation, a new study suggests.

"It's critically important that we understand some of the root causes that lead to those errors and do everything we can to prevent them," said lead author Bernadette Melnyk, dean of the College of Nursing at ...

Breathing Dirty Air Could Raise a Child's Risk for Adult Mental Illness

Kids exposed to air pollution may be at risk for mental illness in early adulthood, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that young adults in Britain who were exposed to higher levels of traffic-related air pollutants during their childhood and teen years were prone to develop symptoms of mental illness later. Nitrogen oxides were a particular problem, the study authors reported.

CBD: How Much Pain Relief Is Real and How Much Is Placebo?

CBD is all the rage, and millions of people are turning to it for a host of reasons, including pain relief.

But despite CBD's popularity and widespread use, new research finds it's actual benefits are less clear.

The bottom line? CBD -- and your expectations about whether it will help (the "placebo effect") -- can make pain feel less bothersome, but it doesn't appear to reduce pain ...

Good Stroke Recovery May Depend on Your ZIP Code: Study

Stroke recovery tends to be worse among Americans in poorer neighborhoods than those in wealthier neighborhoods, a new study finds.

"People in less advantaged neighborhoods were more likely to have more disability, lower quality of life and more symptoms of depression than people in more advantaged neighborhoods," said study author Lynda Lisabeth, from the University of Michigan in Ann Ar...

Gender-Affirming Surgeries Improve Mental Health in Young, Study Says

When gender-diverse or transgender people have surgeries to affirm their gender, they experience a variety of positive mental health outcomes, new research shows.

The study found an association between the surgeries, which participants had at least two years prior to a survey, and significantly lower rates of past-month psychological distress, past-year suicidal ideation and past-year smo...

'Light Therapy' Could Help Brain-Injured Veterans Struggling With PTSD

A popular treatment for the seasonal depression that strikes during dark winter months may also benefit veterans with traumatic brain injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder, a small pilot study suggests.

Results from 16 older veterans found that bright light therapy alongside traditional treatments for these problems improved physical and mental symptoms.

The therapy, in which...

Worry, Depression Can Plague Folks Who Get Implanted Defibrillators

An implanted heart defibrillator is a life changer in more ways than one. More than one in 10 patients who receive the device also developed anxiety or depression, a new study reveals.

The findings highlight the need for regular screening of patients who receive an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in order to identity those who may require additional mental health support, acc...

What's for Lunch? Often, It's What Your Co-Workers Are Having

Everyone has probably heard the expression "you are what you eat," but do you eat what you want, or do you follow the crowd?

New research suggests that what people have at lunch is influenced by the friends or coworkers who they are dining with. And this is true whether they're making healthy choices or unhealthy ones.

"We found that individuals tend to mirror the food choices of ot...

You & Your Friends Are Vaccinated. So Why Is Socializing Again Scary?

Heather Gould, a wedding planner in Sonoma, Calif., always had some social anxiety.

Before the pandemic, she'd feel queasy and think twice about going out. But Gould would power through, talking her way through industry events and client meetings without tipping off her insecurities.

But now, after more than a year of interacting only with her closest friends and family, the challen...

Pandemic Is Leading to More Depression for Pregnant Women Worldwide: Study

Depression and other mental health problems have become much more common among pregnant women and new mothers during the COVID-19 pandemic, an international study finds.

Researchers noted that mental health issues can harm not only a woman's own health but also affect mother-infant bonding and children's health over time.

"We expected to see an increase in the proportion of pregnant...

Long-Haul COVID Symptoms Common, Rise With Severity of Illness

For people who've suffered through a bout of COVID-19, their misery is too often not over. New research shows that a wide variety of "long-haul" symptoms are common, and the risk rises along with the severity of their case of COVID-19.

In what may be the largest such study to date, "the findings show that beyond the first 30 days of illness, substantial burden of health loss -- spanning ...

High-Profile Police Brutality Cases Harm Black Americans' Mental Health: Study

As America awaits a verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial, new research finds that such high-profile police killings of Black people may take a big mental health toll on psyches across the country.

Researchers found that, on average, Black Americans reported an increase in "poor mental health days" during weeks where more than one deadly racial incident was in the news.

Those incidents...

What Makes for a Satisfying Work Zoom Meeting?

Video conferencing has surged during the COVID-19 pandemic, but many workers are developing what some call "Zoom fatigue."

Now, new research suggests a prime factor behind the trend: A lack of inclusion. The study finds that when people feel they're really part of the group being gathered together, video conferences become less exhausting.

In the study, researchers asked 55 Americ...

High School Football Doesn't Affect Brain in Middle Age, Study Says

Here's some good news for aging athletes: If you played high school football, you're no more likely than others to have problems with concentration, memory or depression in middle age, according to a new study.

"Men who played high school football did not report worse brain health compared with those who played other contact sports, noncontact sports, or did not participate in sports dur...

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