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Results for search "Psychology / Mental Health: Misc.".

Health News Results - 701

State Lotteries Didn't Help Boost Vaccination Rates

FRIDAY, Oct. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A shot at winning $1 million did nothing to budge the number of people who got the COVID-19 jab.

According to a new study, lotteries...

Big Worry for Folks Heading to Hospital: Who'll Care for My Pet?

THURSDAY, Oct. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Dr. Tiffany Braley works with patients who have experienced strokes and other serious health conditions, treating them at the Michigan hospital where she works as they begin their recovery.

Braley noticed there was a trend among patients who resisted being admitted to or staying in the hospital: They just wanted to get home, b...

Many Addicts Turned to Telemedicine During Pandemic, But Does It Beat In-Person Care?

The coronavirus pandemic forced a significant shift to telemedicine treatment for addiction, but it's not clear whether that approach is better than in-person care, a new study finds.

Before the pandemic, addiction treatment services in the United States had many restrictions on telemedicine use, so only about 27% of addiction facilities offered telehealth services, while telehealth was u...

Survey Finds Who's Most Likely to Give to Charity and How

Older adults are more likely than younger ones to give to charity, but are more likely to support ones in their own country, an international study reveals.

"As countries, including the U.K., are announcing cuts to foreign aid budgets, there will be an increasing reliance on global charities," said senior author Patricia Lockwood, of the Center for Human Brain Health at the University of ...

Men, Women Behaved Differently During Pandemic Lockdowns

How do men and women respond to a crisis?

A look at their behavior during the first COVID-19 lockdown in 2020 offers a clue: Women flocked to their phones for long conversations with a few trusted contacts.

Men, chafing at being cooped up, headed out and about as soon as they could, European researchers report.

"The total shutdown of public life was like a population-wide liv...

Study Confirms Rise in Child Abuse During COVID Pandemic

FRIDAY, Oct. 8, 2021 (HealthDay News)-- Physical abuse of school-aged kids tripled during the early months of the pandemic when widespread stay-at-home orders were in effect, a new study finds.

Exactly what triggered the surge is not fully understood, but other studies have also reported similar upticks in child abuse. A pediatrician who was not involved in the new research suspects COVID...

Kids With Food Allergies Are Often Targets for Bullies

Life is challenging enough for teens and pre-teens with food allergies. But bullying often comes with the territory, making their situation worse.

In a new study of more than 100 kids with food allergies, nearly one-third said they had been subject to some form of food allergy-related bullying.

"We also found that only 12% of parents reported that their child was bullied for ...

Depression in Early Life May Up Dementia Risk Later

Happy young adults may be somewhat protected from dementia, but the reverse may be true, too: If you're a depressed young adult, your odds for dementia rise, a new study suggests.

"Generally, we found that the greater the depressive symptoms, the lower the cognition and the faster the rates of decline," researcher Wi...

1 in 10 People Have Gastro Issues After a Meal

If you often have a stomachache after eating, you're not alone, a new survey finds. One in 10 people experience frequent meal-related pain.

This includes 13% of women and 9% of men, and is most common in 18- to 28-year-olds (15%), according to an online survey of more than 54,000 people in 26 countries.

"The take home message from this study is that people who experience meal-relate...

Pandemic Stress Altered Many Women's Menstrual Cycles

From the fear of getting sick to lockdown isolation, the COVID-19 pandemic dramatically increased stress levels, and for many women, the uptick led to changes in their monthly periods.

More than half of respondents to an online survey reported changes in their menstrual cycles during the pandemic, including...

'Personalized' Brain Zaps May Ease Tough-to-Treat Depression

Imagine battling debilitating depression for years, trying everything but finding little or no relief.

That's what Sarah, 36, lived with most of her adult life.

"I had exhausted all possible treatment options," recalled Sarah, who did not want her last name used. "It [depression] had controlled my entire life. I barely moved. I barely did anything. I felt tor...

Special Therapy Brings Relief to Patients With Chronic Back Pain

Many people with long-term back pain have tried physical therapy and medication, to no avail. A new study suggests they might "unlearn" their discomfort in weeks -- using psychological therapy.

"For a long time, we have thought that chronic pain is due primarily to problems in the body, and most treatments to date have targeted that," said Yoni Ashar, who led the study while earning his P...

Sibling Bullying Carries Long-Term Mental Health Costs

Bullying by a brother or sister in childhood can have lasting effects, threatening mental health in the teen years, new British research suggests.

Researchers found that mental health was affected whether one was the bully or the victim.

"Of particular note was the finding that even those who bullied their siblings, but weren't bullied themselves [i.e. the bullies] had poorer mental...

LGBQ Teens More Likely to Contemplate Suicide

Kids who are gay, bisexual or questioning their sexuality may be vulnerable to contemplating suicide at a tender age, a new U.S. government study finds.

It has long been known that teenagers who are part of sexual minorities have a higher risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors, compared to their heterosexual peers. That includes kids who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or...

Stopping Antidepressants Raises Relapse Risk

People who stop taking antidepressants after long-time use may face a high likelihood of spiraling into depression again, a new study suggests.

British researchers found that among patients who stopped taking their antidepressants because they felt well, 56% relapsed within a year. That compared with 39% of patients who stayed on medication.

Experts said the results offer some hard ...

Fruits, Veggies a Recipe for Mental Well-Being in Kids

Teens who eat lots of fruits and vegetables are likely to enjoy better mental health.

That's the key takeaway from a new study that also tied a nutritious breakfast and lunch to emotional well-being in kids of all ages.

"This study provides the first insights into how fruit and vegetable intake affects children's mental health and contributes to the emerging evidence around 'food an...

For Boys, Sports Key to Mental Health

Trying to fit soccer or Little League into your son's busy schedule? Canadian researchers offer some compelling reasons to do so.

Little boys who play sports are less apt to be anxious or depressed later in childhood and more likely to be active in their early teens, according to the University of Montreal study.

"We wanted to clarify the long-term and reciprocal relationship in sch...

Childhood Trauma Linked With Higher Odds for Adult Neurological Ills

Kids who suffer abuse, neglect or household dysfunction are more likely to have neurological problems like stroke or headaches as adults, researchers report.

"Traumatic events in childhood have been linked in previous studies to a higher risk of heart disease, diabetes, riskier health behaviors like smoking and drug use, and decreased life expectancy," said researcher Dr. Adys Mendizabal...

Sexual Assault Could Affect a Woman's Long-Term Brain Health

It's known that sexual assault affects a woman's physical and mental health. Now, researchers say these traumatic incidents may also harm her brain health.

A new study found that traumatic experiences, including sexual violence, may be linked to greater risk of dementia, stroke and other brain disorders.

"Identifying early warning signs of stroke and dementia are critical to provid...

Dealing With Grief in the Time of COVID

That feeling that many people are collectively experiencing right now? It's grief.

Some may be living through the loss of family, friends or colleagues who have died from the COVID-19 virus. Others have had losses that would be considered major life events, such as a job layoff. Many have lost recreation, social support and relationships.

Grief can be part of all of these types of ...

Neighborhood Gun Violence Means Worse Mental Health for Kids

Living within a few blocks of a shooting increases the risk that a child will end up visiting the emergency department for mental health-related problems, researchers say.

The new study found significant increases in mental health-related ER visits in the two weeks after a neighborhood shooting, especially among kids who lived closest to it and those exposed to multiple shootings.

"...

Depression During Menopause: How to Spot It and Treat It

Emotional changes in the run-up to menopause can sometimes lead to depression.

It can be important to see a doctor to help determine whether you're just feeling stressed or "blue" -- or whether you might have clinical or major depression, a condition associated with a chemical imbalance in the brain.

Changing hormones during perimenopause -- the time when a woman's body is preparing...

Do Your Genes Up Your Odds for Alcoholism? One Factor Cuts the Risk

Even when genetics and personality are working against you, having a strong network of supportive friends and family may help lower alcoholism risk, researchers say.

"Genes play an important role in alcohol use," stressed Jinni Su, an assistant professor of psychology at Arizona State University in Tempe, and lead author of a new study.

But "genes are not our destiny," she added.

In Your Sights: How Eye Contact Enhances a Conversation

Seeing eye to eye -- literally -- makes conversations more appealing, a new study finds.

"Eye contact is really immersive and powerful," said researcher Sophie Wohltjen, a graduate student in psychological and brain sciences at Dartmouth College.

"When two people are having a conversation, eye contact signals that shared attention is high -- that they are in peak synchrony with one ...

Anxious? Maybe You Can Exercise It Away

Anxiety prevention may be just a snowy trail away.

New research suggests cross-country skiers -- and perhaps others who also exercise vigorously -- are less prone to develop anxiety disorders than less active folks.

Researchers in Sweden spent roughly two decades tracking anxiety risk among more than 395,000 Swedes. Nearly half the participants were skiers with a history of competin...

Could You Help Prevent a Suicide? Know the Warning Signs

Knowing the warning signs of suicide can save a life, experts say.

Suicide is the 10th leading overall cause of death in the United States, and number two among people between the ages of 10 and 34.

Most suicides result from depression. It can cause someone to feel worthless, hopeless and a burden on others, making suicide falsely appear to be a solution, according to the

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  • Getting Your First COVID Shot Can Boost Mental Health: Study

    When you got your first COVID-19 jab, did you breathe a sigh of relief? If so, you're not alone.

    U.S. adults who got the vaccine between December 2020 and March 2021 experienced a 4% reduction in their risk of being mildly depressed and a 15% drop in their risk of severe depression, researchers reported Sept. 8 in the journal PLOS ONE.

    "People who got vaccinated experienced a reduct...

    Would More Free Time Really Make You Happier?

    Many people feel their to-do list is overloaded, but there is also such a thing as too much free time, a new study suggests.

    In a series of studies, researchers found that having either too little or too much free time seemed to drain people's sense of well-being.

    It's no surprise that constantly feeling pressed for time -- and the stress that creates -- can take a toll on well-bein...

    Adults With Autism, Mental Illness May Be at Higher Risk for Severe COVID

    Adults with autism, intellectual disabilities or mental health disorders are at increased risk for COVID-19 and severe illness, researchers report.

    Being aware of the heightened risk is important in prioritizing COVID-19 prevention measures, such as vaccination, testing, masking and distancing for these groups, the researchers said.

    "These high-risk populations should be recognized ...

    Annoyed When Watching Others Fidget? You're Not Alone

    If other people's fidgeting drives you nuts, you may be one of many people with a condition called misokinesia, which means "hatred of movements," Canadian researchers report.

    They conducted experiments with more than 4,100 people and found that about one-third have the condition.

    Typically, folks with misokinesia "experience reactions such as anger, anxiety or frustration" watching...

    Transgender People Face Twice the Odds for Early Death: Study

    Transgender people have double the odds of dying early compared to folks whose identity matches the sex they were assigned at birth (cisgender), a long-term study finds.

    And the added risk did not decrease over time, according to an analysis of data collected from more than 4,500 transgender people in the Netherlands between 1972 and 2018.

    Study author Martin den Heijer said the ri...

    Mind & Body: Marriage, City Living May Help When Heart Disease Strikes

    Feelings of despair and hopelessness can raise the odds of death in people battling heart disease, and new research suggests that where you live, as well as your marital status, can also play a role.

    The study found that heart disease patients who lived in rural areas and were unmarried were more likely to feel hopeless.

    "Because we know hopelessness is predictive of death in p...

    College Is Even More Stressful for Girls: Study

    Even before COVID-19, college could be a challenging experience, but a new study suggests those stresses are much higher for female students.

    Still, in the face of a continuing pandemic, all students may need interventions to develop healthy coping strategies, the study authors said.

    "They're balancing work, classes, relationships and family -- and then now you're throwing COVID on...

    Feel Guilty About 'Useless' Leisure Time? Your Mental Health Might Suffer

    Struggling to decide whether to spend another hour at the office or take a late afternoon stroll?

    Put on your walking shoes.

    Making leisure time a priority is good for your mental health. For many, though, especially folks who prize productivity above all, it's a hard sell, a new study finds.

    "There is plenty of research which suggests that leisure has mental health benefits ...

    Parents, Look Out for Mental Health Issues as College Kids Return to Class

    This year of pandemic isolation and anxiety has been tough for many, but an expert says college students are at particularly high risk for mental health issues as they transition from adolescence to adulthood.

    As students return to their campuses, it's important for parents to monitor their young adults' mental health, said Dr. Richard Catanzaro, chief of behavioral health at Northern Wes...

    Having Someone Who'll Listen May Be Good for Your Aging Brain

    Could the constancy of a sympathetic ear help guard your brain against the ravages of aging?

    Yes, claims new research that analyzed data on nearly 2,200 American adults and found those in their 40s and 50s who didn't have someone to listen to them had a mental ("cognitive") age that was four years older than those who had good listeners in their lives.

    Having an ear to bend when you...

    Only 1 in 10 Kids With ADHD Will Outgrow It

    Struggling with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as a child is heart-breaking enough, but now new research confirms what many have long suspected: These patients will often continue to be plagued by ADHD symptoms as adults.

    Only about one in 10 kids with the disorder are likely to have a full and lasting remission of their symptoms, according to new data gleaned from tracki...

    Lyme Disease Can Wreak Havoc on Mental Health

    Lyme disease can exact a significant mental toll as well as a physical one on its sufferers, a new study confirms.

    Patients hospitalized for Lyme disease had a 28% higher incidence of mental disorders and were twice as likely to attempt suicide than people without Lyme, researchers report.

    "These findings highlight the need for greater awareness in the medical community that patien...

    Ketamine Appears Safe as Therapy for Tough-to-Treat Depression

    The anesthesia drug ketamine and a related medicine called esketamine appear to be safe for tough-to-treat depression, researchers report.

    A number of studies have suggested that low doses of ketamine, which is also abused as a club drug under monikers that include "K" and "Special K," provide rapid antidepressant effects, typically improving mood within 24 hours to seven days.

    Sim...

    Why Losing Someone to Violence Can Be Especially Tough to Get Over

    It can take years for a survivor of a traumatic event to recover from the loss of a loved one, new research shows, but treating the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) early may help prevent what's called complicated grief.

    "Grief is a normal response to the loss of someone close, but traumatic losses may severely harm survivors for years," said lead study autho...

    More 'Green Time,' Less Screen Time Boosts Kids' Mental Health

    Want to see a temperamental tween or teen act happier?

    The formula is simple, a large international study suggests.

    "Screen time should be replaced by 'green time' for optimizing the well-being of our kids," said study author Asad Khan, an associate professor in biostatistics and epidemiology at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia.

    That advice stems from survey...

    Heading Back to the Workplace? Here's Some Tips to Help Re-Adjust

    Freaked out about trading Zoom meetings and the privacy of working at home for a return to the office?

    You've got plenty of company. As more workplaces reopen, stress about health risks and new routines is front and center.

    The Center for Workplace Mental Health knows what you're are going through. The center, a program of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Foundation, is of...

    Death of Spouse Could Raise Men's Odds for Prostate Cancer

    Widowers have a higher risk for advanced prostate cancer than men who are part of a couple, Canadian researchers say.

    The new findings are from an analysis of 12 studies comparing 14,000 men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer and 12,000 healthy men.

    The study -- recently published in the European Journal of Epidemiology -- suggests that social environment is an important ...

    Blood Test Spots Biological Markers for Schizophrenia

    Schizophrenia is a debilitating disease that can make navigating daily life a massive challenge, but a new blood test could flag it in its early stages, researchers say.

    Their analysis of blood samples identified epigenetic markers -- part of your DNA -- that differ between people with schizophrenia and those without the mental health disorder.

    The researchers developed a model to a...

    Kids of Heavy Drinkers Face Multiple Threats to Health

    Death, injuries, abuse and mental health disorders are among the many harms faced by children whose parents are heavy drinkers, Danish researchers say.

    "Within the last 10 years, there has been an expansion of research on consequences that extend beyond the drinker," wrote lead author Julie Brummer, a doctoral student in psychology and behavioral sciences at Aarhus University, Denmark, an...

    Pandemic Stresses Enough to Trigger Political, Social Unrest: Analysis

    The psychological strains of the pandemic can be powerful tinder for political unrest and violence, researchers warn.

    "The pandemic has disrupted our normal way of living, generating frustrations, unprecedented social exclusion, and a range of other concerns," said study author Henrikas Bartusevičius, a researcher with the Peace Research Institute Oslo in Norway. "Our investigations show...

    Gruesome Cigarette Warnings May Work on Smokers: Study

    Gangrene. Throat cancer. A newborn on a feeding tube.

    Gruesome warning images like those on cigarette packs do indeed scare smokers, but they should be combined with other anti-smoking measures, a new study finds.

    These kinds of graphic warning labels were approved by U.S. lawmakers in 2009, but implementation has been stalled until legal challenges to the law by the tobacco industr...

    Women Can Dance Themselves to Better Health After Menopause

    Better health and self-image might just be a samba or some funky moves away.

    That's true for postmenopausal women who, a new study says, can dance their way to better physical and emotional health.

    "In addition to the positive effects on physical, metabolic and mental health aspects, dance promotes a moment of leisure, fun, socialization, self-knowledge and many other b...

    The Bigger the City, the Lower the Depression Rates?

    Americans living in big cities have relatively low rates of depression, despite the hustle and bustle -- or maybe because of it, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that compared with smaller U.S. cities, big urban hubs generally had lower rates of depressionamong residents. And they think the pattern can be explained, in part, by the wide range of social interactions that busy cities...

    AHA News: Protecting Children's Mental Health as They Head Back to School

    At-home schooling was no vacation for Francis Huang and her 11-year-old daughter, Cheyenne Kuo.

    The COVID-19 pandemic thrust remote learning upon their family in spring 2020. With it came the stresses now familiar to millions of families. "I think the whole year, we just tried to survive," said Huang, who lives in suburban Dallas.

    In August, they finally leave all that behind, when ...

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