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Results for search "Weight Gain".

03 Oct

Preventing Middle-Age Spread: Skipping These Foods Will Help, New Study Finds

New evidence details which foods to eat and which to avoid if you want to keep the scale from creeping up during middle age.

Health News Results - 88

When It Comes to Weight Gain, Not All Antidepressants Are the Same

Weight gain is a common side effect of antidepressants, but some types cause people to pack on pounds more than others, a new study says.

Bupropion users are 15% to 20% less likely to gain a significant amount of weight than those taking the most common antidepressant, sertraline, res...

Germs in Your Gut Could Sway Your Odds for Obesity

Research into germs that travel through the human digestive tract shows that some may promote obesity while others might help prevent it.

Not only that, but those microbes may act differently in men versus women, the same study found.

“Our findings reveal how an imbalance in distinct bacterial groups are likely to play an important role in the onset and development of

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 3, 2024
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  • Look to Your Parents for Your Odds of Obesity: Study

    Folks worried about becoming flabby in middle age should check out what their parents looked like when they were that age, a new study says.

    People are six times more likely to become obese in middle age if both their parents were chubby during that time of their lives, according to research to be present...

    Vicious Cycle: Depression and Weight Gain Often Go Together

    A bout of depression can trigger a bump in body weight among people struggling with obesity, a new study has found.

    People who had an increase in symptoms related to depression experienced an increase in their weight a month later, researchers report in the journal PLOS One.

    “Overall, this suggests that individuals with overweight o...

    Patients Taking Psychiatric Meds Often Gain Weight. Scientists May Now Know Why

    Weight gain has long been an unwanted side effect of medicines commonly used to treat psychiatric conditions such as bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.

    Some patients may quit their meds to avoid piling on pounds. Or if they stick to their meds and weight gain continues, they face higher risks for diabetes and liver disease.

    However, research in mice is pinpointing how this drug-link...

    A Vibrating Capsule You Swallow Might Keep Weight Gain at Bay

    Can't afford Ozempic?

    You might soon have another weight-loss option, in the form of an ingestible vibrating capsule that tricks the body into thinking the stomach is full.

    Animals given the multivitamin-sized pill 20 minutes before eating ate about 40% less than usual, researchers report.

    “For somebody who wants to lose weight or control their appetite, it could be taken be...

    Metformin May Help Young Patients With Bipolar Disorder Avoid Weight Gain

    Taking the drug metformin -- typically used for type 2 diabetes -- can help counter weight gain in young people who are taking medication for bipolar disorder, according to a new trial.

    While second-generation antipsychotic medications (SGAs) that treat bipolar disorder can help improve mental health, significant side effects include higher blood pressure and blood sugar, increased appeti...

    Beating 'Middle-Age Spread':  Carbs You Should and Shouldn't Eat

    A diet rich in whole grains, fruits and non-starchy vegetables is the best recipe for middle-aged folks trying to keep their weight under control, new research finds.

    Low in added sugar, yet rich in vitamins and minerals, such foods are considered “high-quality” carbs, investigators explained.

    The same cannot be said of refined grains, sugary beverages or starchy vegetables. Su...

    In 22 U.S. States, More Than a Third of Adults Are Now Obese

    Obesity is on the rise across the United States.

    In 22 states, 35% of adults or more were obese last year, new data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show.

    Just 10 years ago, there were no states that had obesity rates at or above 35%.

    “Our updated maps send a clear message that additional support for obesity prevention and treatment is an urgent prio...

    COVID Pandemic Might Have Pushed More Girls Into Early Puberty

    More girls started puberty before age 8 during the COVID-19 pandemic, a phenomenon called precocious puberty, researchers say.

    The reasons include potential risk factors such as increased screen time and less exercise, according to a new study, published online Aug. 3 in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

    In precocious puberty, children's bodies begin changing into adult...

    Extra Pounds in Youth Could Raise a Man's Odds for Fatal Prostate Cancer Decades Later

    When young men pack on excess weight during their teens and 20s, they may inadvertently drive up their risk for prostate cancer later on.

    The concern stems from new research that examined several decades' worth of weight fluctuations and prostate cancer rates among nearly 260,000 men in Sweden.

    The men ranged in age from 17 to 60. Researchers initially observed that overall, partici...

    Apetamin: Using This Illegal Weight-Gain Product Can Bring Tragic Results

    U.S. regulators are urging Americans to avoid Apetamin, an illegal drug used for weight gain and figure enhancement.

    The substance, typically sold as a syrup, is manufactured overseas, illegally imported and isn't approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    It contains a potent antihistamine called cyproheptadine, which requires a physician's prescription in the United State...

    Why Is American Food So Unhealthy?

    It's no secret: The standard American diet is at the root of the obesity epidemic and many of its associated diseases.

    But why is American food so unhealthy? It's not just that Americans eat too much, which they do, but it's also what they eat that's unhealthy: fat, sugar, salt and ultra-processed foods.

    According to the

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 17, 2023
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  • Weight Changes After Parkinson's Diagnosis May Signal Thinking Declines

    Weight loss soon after a person is diagnosed with Parkinson's disease may be a sign that mental declines are likely to follow, new research suggests.

    "Early weight loss is a

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 20, 2022
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  • It Doesn't Take Much Weight Gain to Raise Odds for Knee Trouble

    A person doesn't have to pack on very many extra pounds before their risk of needing a knee replacement increases substantially, a new evidence review has found.

    Weight gain of just 11 pounds increases a woman's odds of needing total knee replacement surgery by one-third, and a man's by one-quarter, researchers rep...

    Biggest Weight Gain Now Comes Early in Adulthood

    The obesity epidemic isn't slowing down anytime soon, and new research delivers even worse news: Most American adults have not only gained more weight, but they gained most of it earlier in life.

    The statistics were grim: More than half of Americans in the representative sample had gained 5% or more body weight during a 10-year period. More than one-third of Americans had gained 10% or mo...

    How a Lack of Sleep Can Widen Your Waistline

    People who choose to skip sleep to study, work or play late into the night may find they've extended not just their waking hours but also their tummies.

    A small new study found that the basic problem sources back to the fact that people who don't get enough sleep tend to eat more...

    Excess Weight in Midlife Means a Sicker Old Age: Study

    Here's a compelling reason to shed those extra pounds: A new study finds that middle-aged people who are obese, or even simply overweight, may face more health problems down the road.

    The study, of nearly 30,000 men and women, found that the more people weighed around age 40, the greater their odds of chronic health conditions after age 65. And

  • Amy Norton
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  • March 21, 2022
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  • Shedding Pounds Might Help Stop Pre-Cancerous Colon Polyps

    Colon cancer rates are increasing for younger Americans, along with rates of obesity. Could slimming down reduce young people's risk for malignancy?

    A new study suggests that even a small amount of weight loss may cut your odds for benign growths in the colon known as adenomas, or polyps. Left unchecked, these growths can lead to

    Could Everyday Plastics Help Make You Fat?

    Is your plastic water bottle widening your waistline?

    Could be.

    In a new study, Norwegian researchers said that chemicals in common plastic products like water bottles or food packaging may put you at risk of piling on the pounds.

    "Our experiments show that ordinary plastic products contain a mix of substances that can be a relevant and underestimated factor behind overweight...

    Keeping Weight Stable Could Help Save Your Brain

    Older adults who maintain a steady weight as they age are less likely to experience rapid cognitive decline, regardless of how much they weigh to start, new research suggests.

    "There's something about maintaining weight and BMI that seems to reflect some health resilience," said study author Michal Schnaider Beeri, a professor of psychiatry at Icahn Mount Sinai in New York City. (BMI is an es...

    Nearly Half of Americans Gained Weight in Pandemic's First Year

    Did you watch your waistline expand during lockdown? You're not alone.

    Nearly half of U.S. adults piled on excess pounds during the first year of the pandemic, making a national obesity crisis even worse, a new study shows.

    "Obesity was an epidemic before the pandemic, and little was known on body weight changes in...

    Adding Juice to Baby's Diet Could Set Stage for Obesity

    Giving your baby fruit juice too early in life could lead to greater intake of sugary drinks later in childhood and much higher odds for obesity and tooth decay, a new study of more than 4,000 American mothers has found.

    According to a team led by Edwina Yeung, of the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, introducing fruit juice to infants before they were a year ...

    'Active Grandparent': Humans Evolved to Exercise in Old Age

    Becoming a couch potato as you get older goes against evolution and puts your health at risk, a new study suggests.

    Humans have evolved to be active in their later years, and staying active can protect against heart disease and a number of other serious health problems, according to researchers at Harvard.

    "It's a widespread idea in Western societies that as we get older, it's norma...

    Pandemic Curbed Kids' Efforts to Lose Excess Weight

    A new study is highlighting yet another consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic: It has likely made it even harder for kids with obesity to manage their weight.

    The findings, researchers said, are no surprise. Many adults, faced with normal life being upended during the pandemic, have seen changes on the bath...

    Women Feel More Stigma From 'Spare Tire' Around Middle Than Men

    Belly fat. No one wants it, but women are much harder on themselves about extra pounds wrapped around their middle than men are, regardless of how much they weigh.

    And the more they beat themselves up about their "spare tire," the more likely women are to gain weight in this high-risk area, new research suggests. Visceral (belly) fat wraps around the organs in the abdomen, and is thought ...

    Good Sleep May Help Babies Avoid Obesity as They Grow

    You've probably heard that getting better sleep can be good for your waistline. The same appears to be true for your baby.

    Newborns who get more sleep and wake up less during the night are less likely to become overweight in infancy, according to a just-published study.

    "While an association between insufficient sleep and weight gain is well-established in adults and older children,...

    Even With Mild COVID, Obesity May Mean Worse Symptoms

    Obese people have a tougher time fighting COVID-19, even if they have a milder form of the virus, a new study finds.

    Researchers looked at more than 500 patients who tested positive for COVID but didn't require hospitalization. Teens and adults who were overweight or obese had more symptoms, including cough and shortness of breath, than those of normal weight.

    "Even when infected wi...

    Obese? Lose Lots of Weight, Watch Your Heart Risks Drop

    It's no secret that excess weight is bad for the heart. But a new study suggests that obese people who lose a substantial amount of weight may reverse the related cardiovascular risks.

    Researchers found the odds for high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol were similar in formerly obese Americans who were now at a healthy weight and people who had always had a healthy weight.

    Di...

    Child Obesity Rose Sharply During Pandemic

    Childhood obesity was a worrisome issue before the pandemic, and now it's alarmingly worse, new data shows.

    A U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study found a "profound increase in weight gain for kids" that is "substantial and alarming," Dr. Alyson Goodman, one of the study's authors, told the Associated Press.

    For the study, researchers reviewed the medical r...

    In 16 States, 35% or More Residents Now Obese: CDC

    America's waistline keeps widening.

    On Wednesday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that 16 states now have at least 35% of their residents who are obese, a number that's nearly doubled since 2018.

    The CDC's 2020 Adult Obesity Prevalence Maps now show that Delaware, Iowa, Ohio and Texas have joined Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, ...

    One Key Factor Drives Weight Gain in College

    College students often put on weight during their freshman year, and a lack of structured exercise may be largely to blame, a new study suggests.

    Weight gain is so common among first-year college students that it has spawned the phrase "the freshman 15" -- though that figure is something of a myth.

    More often, studies have found, college freshmen gain about 8 pounds over the academi...

    Whole Grains Every Day: Key to Your Health and Waistline

    Whole grains can help older adults maintain a thinner waist, lower blood pressure and lower blood sugar, new research suggests.

    Just three servings a day may do the trick, the authors said.

    One serving is a slice of whole-grain bread, a half-cup of rolled oat cereal, or a half-cup of brown rice.

    Researchers noted that their study -- partially funded by the General Mills Bell ...

    Obese Men May Have Better Survival With Advanced Prostate Cancer

    When men have advanced prostate cancer, obesity might offer something of a survival advantage, a preliminary study suggests.

    Researchers in Italy found that among men with prostate cancer that had spread throughout the body, those who were obese were less likely to die over the next few years.

    Roughly 30% were still alive after three years, versus 20% of normal-weight and overweight...

    Lockdown Weight Gain May Have Caused Surge in New Diabetes Cases in Kids

    Rates and severity of type 2 diabetes among U.S. children rose during the COVID-19 pandemic, possibly due to weight gain during lockdowns, researchers say.

    "While our study examined hospital admissions for type 2 diabetes in children at one center, the results may be a microcosm of what is happening at other children's hospitals across the country," said lead author Dr. Daniel Hsia, an as...

    What's for Lunch? Often, It's What Your Co-Workers Are Having

    Everyone has probably heard the expression "you are what you eat," but do you eat what you want, or do you follow the crowd?

    New research suggests that what people have at lunch is influenced by the friends or coworkers who they are dining with. And this is true whether they're making healthy choices or unhealthy ones.

    "We found that individuals tend to mirror the food choices of ot...

    You Don't Have to Be Obese for Belly Fat to Harm You, Heart Experts Warn

    Extra padding around the belly can spell trouble for the heart, even if you're not technically overweight.

    That's among the conclusions of a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA), where experts lay out the heart risks of being "apple-shaped."

    It encourages doctors to dust off those old-fashioned tape measures and make waist circumference part of patients...

    Obesity May Help Trigger Heavier Periods: Study

    Obese women can be more likely to have heavy monthly periods, and now new research hints at why.

    In addition to stirring up inflammation, excess weight may slow down the uterine repair process, U.K. researchers reported. Menstruation occurs when the lining of the uterus (endometrium) sheds each month, but the healing process stops the bleeding so the lining can build back up.

    Heavy...

    'Couch Potato' Lifestyles Cause Up to 8% of Global Deaths: Study

    "Couch potatoes," take note: Sedentary behavior now accounts for up to 8% of non-communicable diseases and deaths worldwide, researchers say.

    Physical inactivity is a known risk factor for premature death and several non-communicable diseases, including heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and several cancers.

    In a new study, researchers analyzed 2016 da...

    Too Much Restaurant Fare Could Shorten Your Life

    Whether it's takeout or dining in, lives filled with lots of restaurant fare could turn out to be shorter, new research shows.

    The study found that dining out frequently -- two or more meals prepared away from home each day -- is tied to an increased risk of death from any cause.

    One nutritionist who wasn't involved in the study said the findings come as little surprise.

    "Many...

    Pandemic Stress Has Americans Gaining Weight, Drinking More: Poll

    If you're drinking more, sleeping less, seeing downright scary numbers on your scale and fretting about the future, you're far from alone, a new survey reveals.

    "We've been concerned throughout this pandemic about the level of prolonged stress, exacerbated by the grief, trauma and isolation that Americans are experiencing," said Arthur Evans Jr., chief executive officer of the American Ps...

    Many Psych Meds Trigger Weight Gain, But New Research Points to Better Options

    Scientists may have uncovered the reason critical medications for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder cause weight gain and diabetes -- findings they hope will lead to better drugs.

    The medications, known as antipsychotics, help control the hallucinations, delusions and confused thoughts that plague people with schizophrenia. They can also help stabilize extreme mood swings in those with b...

    Why Adding on a Few Pounds as You Age Might Be Good for You

    Putting on a few extra pounds in your 50s may add years to your life -- if you start off at a normal weight and your weight gain doesn't tip into obesity, a new study suggests.

    But two outside experts cautioned that the findings are not a license to pack on the pounds, as study participants who started off obese and continued to gain weight over the years were actually least lik...

    Think You Gained Weight During Quarantine? You Might Be Wrong

    That "quarantine 15" weight gain may be all in your head, not on your hips.

    A team from Florida State University (FSU) compared information on actual and perceived weight changes among a sample of college students from January to April 2020. Participants were far more likely to believe they had gained weight -- even when they hadn't.

    "We found that one in 50 participants had a chang...

    'Couch Potato' Time Rises Sharply After Women Retire

    Women are at high risk of becoming much less active right after they retire, researchers find.

    Inactivity was tracked among nearly 700 participants in an ongoing study of retiring municipal workers in Finland that began in 2013. Most (85%) of the participants were women, with an average retirement age of 63.

    Among women, inactivity levels didn't change much before retirement, but in...

    Who's Most Likely to Binge Eat Amid Pandemic?

    A lot has been made of the so-called "quarantine 15." Now, a new study suggests certain people are more likely to binge eat during the coronavirus pandemic than others.

    Most often they are young adults who faced social stigma about being overweight before COVID-19 swept the globe.

    The researchers found this group had higher levels of depressive symptoms, stress, eating as a ...

    Eating in the Evening Could Be Bad for Your Health

    To get a handle on your eating habits, keep a close eye on the clock, researchers suggest.

    Consuming most of your daily calories in the evening is associated with a less nutritious diet and higher calorie intake, a new study shows.

    Unfortunately, hunger pangs are often strongest later in the day. And this pattern could influence both the type and amount of food we eat, the s...

    How to Keep Your Kids Trim Through Quarantine

    A lot of kids have been pushing up the scale numbers while home during the pandemic -- and parents need to take steps to prevent the dreaded "quarantine 15," an expert says.

    "During the school year, most parents rely on schools to provide their child with regular exercise," said Dr. Joyce Samuel, an associate professor of pediatrics at McGovern Medical School at the University of Texa...

    Working Off Your Quarantine Weight Gain

    Life in lockdown has led many to overeat and gain weight, a phenomenon referred to as the "COVID-15."

    But some small changes can get you back into shape, a weight management specialist suggests.

    "COVID-19 changed how we eat, what we eat and how we spend our day," said Dr. Peter Jian, an assistant professor of family and community medicine at the Baylor College of Medicine ...

    Telehealth May Help Rural Americans Keep the Weight Off

    Although many people can lose weight, few maintain the loss. Could individual telephone support be the key to keeping extra pounds at bay?

    New research suggests that telehealth counseling after weight loss may be just the support that people in rural areas need to maintain their weight loss long-term. At the 12-month point in the study, people who had individual telephone counseling ...

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