Get Healthy!

Results for search "Emergencies / First Aid".

Health News Results - 390

Is a 'Universal' Snake Venom Antidote Near?

A “universal” antivenom can block the lethal toxins in the venoms of a wide variety of poisonous snakes found in Africa, Asia and Australia, researchers report.

The antibody protected mice from the normally deadly venom of snakes like black mambas and king cobras, according to findings published Feb. 21 in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • February 23, 2024
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Protecting Yourself From Winter Weather Injuries

    Falls, frostbite, fractures: They are all potential hazards of icy winter conditions. But experts say there's a lot you can do to avoid injury when snowflakes fall.

    First, stay warm.

    According to the New York City Department of Health, people lose the bulk of their body heat through their heads, so scarves, hats and hoods are essential.

    Other trouble spots -- ...

    Quality of EMS Care Across the Country Varies Widely

    The care you receive in a medical emergency may hinge strongly on where you are when you need it.

    That's a key takeaway from a comprehensive review of the nation's emergency medical service (EMS) systems by researchers at Icahn School of Medicine of Mount Sinai in New York City.

    They found that EMS agencies that responded in mostly rural areas were less likely to treat low blood sug...

    CPR's Lifesaving Powers Decline as Minutes Pass

    CPR can save lives, but its ability to restore heart function goes from slim to none in a shockingly short time, a new study finds.

    How short? A person's chance of surviving cardiac arrest while receiving CPR declines from 22% after one minute of chest compressions to less than 1% after 39 minutes of compressions, researchers report Feb. 7 in the BMJ.

    Meanwhile, the chance ...

    Shark Bites Are Up Worldwide

    Unprovoked shark attacks increased slightly worldwide last year, but twice as many people died from shark bites as the year before, new data show.

    There were 69 unprovoked shark attacks in 2023, higher than the five-year average of 63 attacks per year, according to the University of Florida's International Shark Attack File.

    'Whole Blood' Transfusions Might Save More Lives

    Patients who are bleeding out have a better chance of surviving if they're given whole blood transfusions, a new study shows.

    Traditionally, patients with significant bleeding are given transfusions of specific blood components -- red blood cells, plasma and platelets that have been separated out from whole blood.

    But researchers found that early whole blood transfusions were associ...

    Detergent Pod Poisoning Threat to Kids Hasn't Gone Away

    The health dangers posed by colorful detergent pods continues to plague young children, a new study warns.

    U.S. poison control centers still receive one call every 44 minutes about a young child who's been harmed through exposure to a liquid laundry detergent pod, researchers report.

    The steady stream of calls is evidence that voluntary standards adopted by detergent manufacturers i...

    E-Scooter Injuries Rack Up Big Medical Bills

    Electric scooters might seem a fun way to zip about, but they're also a pricey hazard to riders' health, a new study argues.

    Orthopedic treatment for 82 patients injured in e-scooter wrecks averaged more than $28,400 per person, as doctors labored to mend broken bones and dislocated joints.

    “E-scooters go up to 20 miles per hour, but people are allowed to ride them on sidewalks wi...

    Serious Scooter Injuries Tripled in U.S. in Four Years

    When you're looking for a cheap and easy way to get around town, which is safer -- a scooter or a bike?

    A nationwide look at injuries related to both suggests biking may be the safer way to go.

    UCLA researchers report that scooter injuries nearly tripled across the U.S. between 2016 and 2020, many serious enough to require orthopedic and plastic surgery. The cost of treating those i...

    Deaths Tied to 'Fake Xanax' Street Drug Are Soaring

    Three twenty-somethings in Chicago took a street drug they thought was a harmless form of Xanax.

    All three were found collapsed and unresponsive eight hours later by one of their mothers, who had them rushed to the hospital.

    After multiple seizures, fever and heart damage, all three are thought to have recovered, but not before spending many days hospitalized.

    According to a n...

    Defibrillators Now Mandatory at Some Gyms, Stadiums -- Why Aren't More People Using Them?

    Because athletes young and old can suffer cardiac arrest, some states have mandated the placement of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in gyms, stadiums and other sports venues.

    But a new study finds the use of AEDs by bystanders for cardiac arrest at athletic sites didn't improve much after states enacted these laws.

    The bottom line: “Legislative efforts alone may not be s...

    Post-Trauma Support Can Prevent Repeat Hospitalizations

    When hospitals support trauma survivors' mental health during and after treatment, patients are less likely to return in crisis, researchers report.

    There's no uniform guidance on how to offer mental health services to these patients, noted lead study author Laura Prater.

    Fewer hospital readmissions are a good sign that people's menta...

    Your Child Has a Fever: When Is It Time to See a Doctor?

    It's that time of year when your kids come home with sniffles and sore throats, but when should you worry if they have a fever?

    To a certain extent, fevers are the body's natural way of fighting infection, one expert says.

    “Fever helps the immune system,” explained Dr. Christopher Tolcher, a pediatrician with Agou...

    It's Hunting Season: Keep Safety in Your Sights

    TUESDAY, Dec. 5, 2023 (Healthday News) -- Hunting season has begun in many parts of the United States, with millions of Americans heading into the woods in hopes of bagging a big buck.

    But with the season comes tragic accidents.

    “Every year, within the first 72 hours of hunting season, we see hunting-related injuries,” said

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • December 5, 2023
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Mobile Stroke Units Can Prevent Disabling Strokes

    In some big cities, mobile stroke units can deliver a powerful clot-busting drug to patients as these specialized ambulances speed to the hospital.

    Now, a new study shows these units deliver anti-clotting treatment a median of 37 minutes faster than when traditional ambulances drive stroke patients to the ER. And that extra time gives stroke victims better chances of averting the stroke o...

    Kids Still Getting Injured After Swallowing High-Powered Magnets

    Despite warnings and public education campaigns, kids continue to suffer injuries from swallowing small but strong magnets, according to a new study.

    Children are also inserting high-powered, rare-earth balls into their ears and noses, even in households where parents fully understand the dangers of the toys, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

    “High-powered, ra...

    Young Adults, Black Americans Most Likely to Visit ER for Assault Injuries

    Being young or Black may make it more likely that you wind up in an emergency room with an assault injury, new research suggests.

    Living in metropolitan areas and being covered by state-based health insurance was also tied to a raised risk.

    The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) released the r...

    'Boarding' Patients for Days, Weeks in Crowded ERs Is Common Now

    When Hannah, a California marketing professional, showed up at her local emergency room in March 2023 for a pregnancy-related complication, she wasn't prepared for what happened next.

    “I arrived at 2 p.m. and finally saw the obstetrics team at midnight,” she recalled.

    After an exam, doctors scheduled her for a procedure on the following day, but there wasn't a room available. ...

    Surgeons Seeing More 'Mutilating' Hand Injuries With New Utility Terrain Vehicles

    A popular type of off-road vehicle known as a “side-by-side” has been linked to high rates of severe hand injuries, according to a new study.

    Side-by-sides are utility terrain vehicles (UTVs) designed to carry more than one passenger and heavy loads. All-terrain vehicles (ATVs) are usually made for one driver going off-road.

    "

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • October 3, 2023
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Black Patients More Likely to Be Physically Restrained During ER Visits

    It seemed to some that patients of color were being restrained in the emergency room more often than others, so researchers decided to investigate.

    While physical restraints can be used to keep staff and patients safe, they may also cause injury to the patient, including aspiration, physical trauma and psychological harm.

    A new study bears out what the team from Baylor College of Me...

    Kids' ER Visits for Mental Health Crises Rise When School Term Begins

    While the start of the school year can give kids and teens the chance to reconnect with friends and enjoy school sports and activities, it can also trigger stressors that send many to the emergency room for mental health woes, a new report shows.

    Among children aged 5 to 17, emergency department visits for depression, suicidal thoughts, stress and substance abuse increased significantly i...

    Helping Undocumented Immigrants Find a Primary Care Doc Lowers ER Costs: Study

    Helping undocumented immigrants in the United States connect with primary care doctors could be a money-saver, substantially reducing emergency department use and lowering health costs, a new study finds.

    The findings are from a New York City program that helped arrange medical appointments from May 2016 to June 2017 for undocumented immigrants with limited incomes.

    The data showed ...

    Earthquakes Are Unpredictable: Plan Ahead to Lower the Danger

    When an earthquake struck the center of Morocco earlier this month, killing nearly 3,000 and injuring thousands more, no one was expecting it.

    That sudden rapid shaking of ground as the rocks underneath the earth shift can happen anywhere, but higher-risk areas in the United States include Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, Puerto Rico, Washington and the entire Mississippi River Valley....

    ChatGPT Equals Doctors in Diagnosing Emergency Department Patients

    Emergency medicine doctors someday might rely on consultation from artificial intelligence (AI) programs like ChatGPT to help them quickly and accurately diagnose patients' ailments.

    A new study found that ChatGPT performed about as well as human doctors in diagnosing patients, when both are given the same set of clinical information.

    “In the end, they were pretty comparable,” s...

    In Public Spaces, Women Less Likely to Get CPR If Cardiac Arrest Strikes

    CPR could save your life if you suffer cardiac arrest in a public place, but you're less likely to receive it if you're a woman, a new study finds.

    The findings were presented Monday at the European Emergency Medicine Congress, in Barcelona.

    “In an emergency when someone is unconscious and not breathing properly, in addition to calling an ambulance, bystanders should give CPR. Thi...

    R.A.P.I.D.O. : Acronym & Campaign Helps Spanish Speakers Recognize a Stroke

    The American Stroke Association is promoting the acronym R.Á.P.I.D.O. as a way to raise awareness among Hispanic Americans about stroke symptoms and the need for quick action.

    Every second counts when someone has had a stroke, the association (ASA) points out. Calling 911 immediately can be the difference between life, death or long-term disability.

    A survey showed that only 39% of...

    Web Searches for 'Self-Managed Abortion' Rose After Dobbs Decision

    When some U.S. states made abortion illegal after the Supreme Court overturned the longstanding Roe v Wade in June 2022, women in those areas increased their searches for self-managed abortions.

    To come to that conclusion, researchers from the University of California, Irvine (UCI) analyzed Google search results regarding self-abortion.

    “We found an increased number of searches in...

    Red Cross Appeals for Donors During National Blood Shortage

    The American Red Cross said Monday that it urgently needs blood donations because the national blood supply has dropped nearly 25% since early August.

    Back-to-back climate-related disasters have hampered blood collection efforts, and a summer shortfall has made the shortage worse.

    Patients in need of transfusions as part of cancer and sickle cell disease treatments face the potentia...

    Booming Sales of Legal Marijuana Linked to More Car Crashes

    Emergency room visits for injuries related to driving under the influence of cannabis skyrocketed in Canada after the drug was legalized there, a new study reports.

    In October 2018, Canada became the second country to nationally legalize recreational or nonmedical cannabis for adult use.

    While known cannabis-involved emergency department (ED) visits for traffic injuries were still ...

    Opioid OD Rescue Drug Narcan Will Reach Drug Store Shelves Next Week

    Narcan, a lifesaving medication that reverses opioid overdose, will be available on U.S. drugstore shelves and online starting next week.

    People who want to carry Narcan, the nasal spray version of naloxone, will be able to find it at Walgreens, Rite Aid, Walmart and CVS for a suggested retail price of $44.99 for a box of two doses, the drug maker reported Wednesday.

    T...

    Need Quick Help Learning CPR? Don't Rely on Alexa, Siri

    If you need quick directions on performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in an emergency, don't rely on Alexa, Siri or another voice assistant.

    A new study finds the directions provided by these AI (artificial intelligence) helpers are inconsistent and lack relevance.

    “Our findings suggest that bystanders should call emergency services rather than relying on a voice ass...

    It Only Takes a Bite of a Marijuana Edible to Send a Child to the Hospital

    Brightly colored "edibles" can be tempting for young kids and are more widely available now that many U.S. states have legalized cannabis for recreational and medical use.

    Unfortunately, it doesn't take much of an edible to make a small child very sick, new research finds, which may explain an uptick in hospitalizations of kids poisoned by cannabis.

    “There are many studies de...

    Canadian Wildfire Smoke Caused Spikes in Asthma-Related ER Visits Across the U.S.

    Smoke from Canadian wildfires sent high numbers of people suffering from asthma attacks to America's emergency rooms this spring and summer, according to two new reports.

    From April 30 to August 4, 2023, smoke from out-of-control wildfires in Canada increased emergency room visits for asthma by 17% over average, according to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ...

    Sepsis Almost Killed Jake Tapper's Daughter, Alice. Now, She's Working to Keep Others Safe

    Alice Tapper felt deathly ill, suffering from severe abdominal pain, a 102-degree fever and vomiting.

    Emergency room doctors found that Alice -- the daughter of CNN anchor Jake Tapper -- had a rapid pulse of 135 beats per minute and a very high white blood cell count, indicating her body was fighting off a...

    Bystander CPR, Defib Use Saves Lives Even If Ambulance Arrives Quickly

    Bystander aid using CPR and a defibrillator can be critically important for saving lives when someone has a cardiac arrest -- even when an ambulance arrives quickly, say researchers.

    A new study finds that when a bystander uses a defibrillator, on top of CPR, on someone who has had a cardiac arrest, that patient's 30-day survival improves, even when an ambulance takes just two minutes to ...

    'Time Is Brain': More Americans Waiting Longer for Best Care After Stroke

    When people suffering a stroke need a transfer to another hospital, time is of the essence. But a new study finds that most Americans in that situation face delays.

    The study, published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association, looked at the issue of "door-in, door-out"...

    With Marijuana's Legalization, Cannabis Poisonings Are on the Rise

    In recent years, the legalization of both medical and recreational marijuana has become the new normal across much of North America.

    The problem: New research finds that as legalization has spread, so have cases of cannabis poisoning.

    “We did a systematic review of published studies reporting on what happened to the rates of poisoning after legalization or decriminalization,...

    Dementia Patients Wind up in the ER 1.4 Million Times a Year, Study Shows

    Emergency rooms can be a frightening place for people suffering from dementia, yet each year 1.4 million Americans with Alzheimer's or other dementias wind up in crowded, noisy ERs, a new study finds.

    Dementia is responsible for nearly 7% of all ER visits for those older than 65, often because of accidents or mental health crises, researchers determined.

    "While dementia is thought o...

    EMS Crews May Not Always Follow Guidelines When Dosing Kids: Study

    Less than half of all children treated by emergency medical services receive the right amount of medication during out-of-hospital emergencies, a new study found.

    In some cases, these incorrect doses can have serious consequences.

    “If you don't give the appropriate dose of the anti-seizure medication for a patient with an ongoing seizure, the seizure will not stop,” said study c...

    Danger Afoot: U.S. Pedestrian Deaths at Highest Level in 41 Years

    More than 7,500 people were killed last year after being struck by vehicles while walking along or across U.S. roadways — the most pedestrian deaths in more than four decades, according to a new report.

    This sobering trend was not surprising to experts who track the numbers. But they were dismayed by the consistent increase — up 77% since 2010.

    “This is unacceptable. It's real...

    Is Child's Tummy Pain a Serious Concern? Poll Finds Many Parents Unsure

    Kids get a lot of tummy aches.

    How a parent responds to it can vary, just as the causes can, according to the University of Michigan Health's C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health, which looked more closely at the issue.

    About 1 in 6 parents said their child has tummy pain at least monthly, according to the poll, but many don't call the doctor. One-third...

    This Summer, Could You Spot the Signs of Heat Illness?

    Heat illness can be deadly, so it's essential to recognize the warning signs and know what to do as the summer season gets into gear.

    “Heat illness tends to happen when the body is unable to regulate its temperature due to overexertion or extended periods of time in high temperatures,” said Dr. Maria Carmenz...

    ER-Based Pharmacies Could Improve Kids' Care, Pediatricians' Group Says

    When parents rush their kids to an emergency room in the dead of night for an asthma attack or high fever, they are often discharged with a prescription. The problem is, there may be nowhere to fill it promptly.

    Now, a new report fro...

    Traveling? Here's Your Family Medical Checklist

    When going on vacation, there's a lot to remember, but it's a good idea if you add one more item to the to-do list.

    Baylor College of Medicine in Houston suggests creating a family travel medical checklist, to be sure that you and your loved ones stay healthy and safe while you're away.

    “Traveling can expose families to different environments, climates and potential health risks. ...

    Are ERs Safe? Patients, Nurses and Doctors Say No in New Survey

    Emergency departments aren't perceived as safe for professionals or their patients, according to an international survey from the European Society of Emergency Medicine (EUSEM).

    More than 90% of emergency professionals surveyed said they felt at times the number of patients exceeded the capacity the emergency department (ED) had to provide safe care. Overcrowding was a problem, they said...

    Opioid Overdose Survivors Face Higher Odds for Death in Following Year

    Surviving a trip to the emergency room for an opioid overdose dramatically increases a patient's odds of dying in the year after, U.S. health officials reported Tuesday.

    Of nearly 287,000 emergency room visits in 2016, more than 8,300 were for opioid overdoses. Of these, nearly 500 patients were dead from a drug overdose in the following year and 400 died from other causes, according to a...

    Steroid Hydrocortisone Alone May Not Cut Death Risk From Septic Shock: Study

    A new study finds that while hydrocortisone on its own may not prevent death from sepsis, it can improve survival when combined with other steroids while eliminating the need for vasopressor drugs.

    Vasopressor medications help raise blood pressure when it's so low that you can't get enough blood to your organs. Doctor often deliver these drugs via an IV.

    “For the first time, the e...

    Even Preschoolers Can Help Save a Life, Heart Experts Say

    If you're old enough to dial 911, you're old enough to be a lifesaver.

    Building lifesaving skills can start as young as age 4 and be expanded over the years, the American Heart Association and others advise in a new scientific statement.

    Children can be adept at t...

    ER Visits by Teens in Mental Health Crisis Have Declined: CDC

    There's a glimmer of good news when it comes to the mental health of America's adolescents: Visits to U.S. emergency departments for psychiatric troubles declined among kids aged 12 to 17 by the fall of 2022, compared to a year prior.

    Overall, mean weekly adolescent emergency department (ED) visits for mental health conditions fell by 11% last fall, compared to higher levels in the fall o...

    Spring, Summer Is Peak Time for Dogs Biting Kids

    In the spring and summer, everyone races outside with their dogs to enjoy the warmer weather, but a new study suggests there is a downside to that.

    More children are bitten by dogs in those months, according to researchers at Nemours Children's Health.

    But a dog bite isn't inevitable: It's possible to keep both dogs and children safer, and to provide proper care if the unfortunate d...