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Gardeners, Landscapers: Watch Out for These High Heat Danger Signs

Climate change is pushing daytime summer temperatures higher for longer periods of time, and that can spell real danger for folks who work outside, like gardeners and landscapers.

Protecting yourself in the heat and knowing the warning signs of heat-related illness is crucial, said Chris Enroth, horticulture educat...

Summer of 2023 Was Hottest in 2,000 Years

High temperatures across the Northern Hemisphere last summer were scorching and frequent enough to make it the hottest summer in two millennia, new research shows.

Weather records based on scientific instruments only goes back as far as 1850, noted researchers at Cambridge University in England. That data already had confirmed the summer of 2023 as the hottest ever recorded.

However...

CDC Launches Online 'Heat Forecaster' Tool as Another Summer Looms

Last summer was a record-breaker for heat emergencies, so the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday launched a new online heat forecaster to help folks better prepare as summer nears.

The

Parents, Coaches: Help Young Athletes Avoid Summer Heat Hazards

Another broiling summer looms, along with another season of kids' summer sports.

It's a potentially harmful, even lethal combination. But experts at Nationwide Children's Hospital (NCH) have advice for kids, parents and coaches on how to keep young athletes safe when thermometers rise.

Each year, an estimated 240 people die from heat-linked illnesses, and

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 20, 2024
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  • Rising Number of Americans Sent to ERs Last Year During Heat Waves

    As climate change threatens another long hot summer for Americans, new data shows last summer's record-breaking temperatures sent a rising number of people to emergency departments.

    At special risk of heatstroke and other heat-related issues: Working-age Americans, who often found the...

    Dangerously Hot, Humid Conditions Common in U.S. Prisons

    Almost 2 million Americans incarcerated in the nation's jails and prisons suffer through an average 100 days per year of dangerous heat and humidity, a new report finds.

    A warming world will only increase that danger, say researchers at Columbia University in New York City and elsewhere.

    “Exposure to excess heat and humidity can lead to deadly heat stroke and kidney disease from ...

    High Number of People on HIV-Preventing PrEP Stop Using It

    Many people protected by drugs that prevent HIV infection quit using them, upping their vulnerability to the virus that causes AIDS, new research shows.

    The drug combo known as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is now a mainstay of HIV prevention among gay and bisexual males and other groups at high risk of infectio...

    U.S. Heat-Related Heart Deaths Will Multiply With Warming Temperatures

    As sweltering summer days become more common, the number of Americans who die of heat-related heart problems or strokes could soar over the next few decades, a new study projects.

    The study -- published Oct. 30 in the journal Circulation -- estimates that by mid-century the United States will see thos...

    Runaway Global Warming Will Make Some Areas Too Hot for Human Life

    The signs of climate change are everywhere, from raging wildfires to flash flooding to soaring temperatures.

    Now, a new study warns that things could get worse, with scientists reporting that even small increases in global temperatures will make some parts of the Earth too hot for humans to endure.

    “As long as we continue to put greenhouse gases emissions into the atmosphere, we'...

    Heat-Related Deaths Could Break Records This Year in Phoenix, America's Hottest City

    Phoenix, already the hottest major city in the nation, experienced its most scorching summer on record this year, new data shows. And that will likely prompt the highest number of heat-associated deaths ever reported in the city in one year.

    At this point, Maricopa County public health officials have confirmed 289 heat-associated deaths, the Associated Press reported. As of Sept....

    Old Age & Heat Can Be Deadly Combo: Tips to Stay Safe

    Hot weather can pose serious health risks for older adults.

    Existing medical conditions, problems moving around and medications raise the risk of heatstroke, according to an expert at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

    Being prepared can help prevent heat exhaustion and heatstroke.

    “As we age, we become less efficient at noticing and adjusting to the heat,” geriatr...

    Global Warming Could Make Pregnancies More Dangerous

    Global warming has been linked to higher rates of asthma, heart disease and other health concerns. Now, new research suggests that rising temperatures across the planet may place pregnant women at greater risk for severe pregnancy-related illnesses, especially in their third trimester.

    And this is likely to get worse in the near future, said study author

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 8, 2023
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  • VA Hospitals See Steep, Steady Rise in Heat-Related Illnesses

    Heat domes and extreme heat waves have been battering the United States for years now, and a new study shows that increasing temperatures are doing real harm to humans.

    A significant increase in heat-related illnesses like heat stroke and heat exhaustion has occurred during the past two decades among patients treated at U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) health facilities, VA researc...

    Extreme Heat Taxes the Brain, and Some Face Higher Risks

    With 2023 predicted to be the hottest year on record, a new study is pointing to another potential consequence of heat waves: faster declines in older adults' memory and thinking skills.

    The study, of nearly 9,500 older U.S. adults, found that those with greater exposure to heat waves over 12 year...

    In America's Prisons, Suicide Risk Rises Along With Temperatures

    Punishing heat is a fact of life inside America's prisons without air conditioning, and it is taking a serious toll on prisoners' mental health.

    When the outside thermometer hits 90 degrees Fahrenheit or more, a new study shows that prison suicide risk jumps 36%, in comparison to when temperatures are in the 60s.

    The finding comes from a look at the Louisiana prison system, one of ...

    Extreme Heat Can Take Toll on People Battling Mental Health Issues

    While the record-breaking heat the United States is experiencing this summer can stress people to their limits, it can be particularly hard to navigate for those with mental health issues.

    "All mental illnesses increase with heat because it results in more fatigue, irritability and anxiety, and it can exacerbate depressive episodes," said

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 27, 2023
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  • Hot, Polluted Days May Double Heart Attack Risk

    The extreme heat and choking wildfire smoke blanketing wide swaths of the United States this summer are actively dangerous to heart health, a new study reports.

    Days where soaring heat combines with fine particulate air pollution can double a person's risk of a fatal heart attack, researchers have found.

    “Heat wave exposure interacts synergistically with fine particulate pollution...

    Be Smart When Working Out in Steamy Summer Weather

    It's hot out there. If you're working out outdoors this summer, take precautions.

    “If you plan to exercise in the heat, know your fitness level, take frequent breaks, wear proper clothing, wear sunscreen, avoid hottest times of the day and hydrate, hydrate, hydrate,” said Melanie...

    Need Vitamin D, But Need to Watch the Sun? Here's How You Do It

    Your body needs vitamin D, the "sunshine" vitamin, but too much time in the sun can increase your risk for skin cancer.

    An expert offers tips for boosting vitamin D intake while staying safe from the sun and this summer's record-high temperatures.

    “Vitamin D is important for bone health, calcium absorption, reduction of inflammation, promoting cell growth and immune and cardiovas...

    Steer Clear of UTIs This Summer

    Dehydration brings lots of risks — including urinary tract infections (UTIs).

    An expert offers some tips for avoiding these painful infections without sacrificing summer fun.

    “Patients can experience more UTIs during the summer due to inadequate fluid intake, especially in the historic heat waves we've been experiencing,” said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 19, 2023
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  • Triple-Digit Heat Wave a Danger to Those With Dementia

    As extreme heat continues to blanket numerous parts of the United States, Americans with dementia may be particularly challenged.

    “Triple-digit temperatures and heat indexes are especially dangerous for someone with a dementia-related illness such as Alzheimer's disease, because the effects of dementia can impair their ability to notice if they are developing heat stroke or dehydra...

    Heat: How Much Can the Human Body Stand?

    Record-breaking heat waves are pummeling the United States and the world, causing many to wonder how much of this a body can take and still survive.

    The limit is somewhere between 104 and 122 degrees Fahrenheit if you're sitting perfectly still, according to a small study conducted in the United Kingdom.

    Researchers say they are starting to hone in on the high temperatures that...

    Heat Waves a Hazard for People With Dementia

    Heat waves that hit the triple digits, like the ones now gripping many parts of the United States this week, can create dangerous conditions for folks who are vulnerable.

    One vulnerable group is people with Alzheimer's disease or dementia, who may not realize they're developing heat illness. But caregivers can take steps to keep them safer.

    “Triple-digit temperatures and heat inde...

    Protect Your Kids in Blistering Summer Heat

    Enjoy that summer sun, but keep some safety tips in mind, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) advises parents.

    “It's great to see children enjoying nature and reaping the benefits of outdoor activities,” Atlanta-based pediatrician Dr. Rebecca Philipsborn said in an AAP ne...

    This Summer, Could You Spot the Signs of Heat Illness?

    Heat illness can be deadly, so it's essential to recognize the warning signs and know what to do as the summer season gets into gear.

    “Heat illness tends to happen when the body is unable to regulate its temperature due to overexertion or extended periods of time in high temperatures,” said Dr. Maria Carmenz...

    Tips to Staying Cool in Extreme Heat

    Extreme heat can be dangerous, but you can stay cool and safe this summer if you take the right precautions.

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) offers some tips for doing so.

    “No matter your age, it is critical to be able to recognize the signs of heat-related illness,” said

    Asthma, Lower Grades, Homelessness: How Climate Change Will Harm America's Kids

    Children are uniquely vulnerable to the effects of climate change, a new report from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) shows.

    Climate change can affect learning, physical health and housing security, which can last throughout the child's life, according to the report.

    “Understanding health risks to children is critical for developing effective and equitable strategie...

    Heat Waves, No A/C: A Deadly Combo at Texas Prisons

    Heat waves may be killing prisoners in Texas, according to an analysis that found far-higher-than-normal death rates in the state's non-air-conditioned prisons.

    “The majority of Texas prisons do not have universal air conditioning,” noted lead study author Julie Skarha. “And in these...

    A Hotter World Can Worsen Heart Failure

    Climate change could spell trouble for those with heart failure, a new study suggests.

    When the temperatures soared in France during the summer of 2019, the heat wave appears to have worsened the conditions of heart failure patients, researchers report.

    "The finding is timely, given the heat waves again this year," said study a...

    As Thermometer Rises, So Does Hate Speech on Twitter

    Internet hotheads are often literally that, with hateful tweets rising in number as temperatures soar, a new study reports.

    Temperatures higher than 86 degrees Fahrenheit are consistently linked to heavy increases in online hate messages, according to a review of more than 4 billion English-language tweets.

    The researchers identified a “feel-good window” between 54 and 70 degree...

    Heat Waves That Threaten Lives Will Be Common by 2100

    Life-threatening heat waves will become more common by the end of this century, according to a new study.

    A “dangerous” heat index — what the temperature feels like when humidity and air temperature are combined — is defined by the National Weather Service (NWS) as 103 degrees Fahrenheit. NWS defines “extremely dangerous” as 124 degrees F -- unsafe to humans for any amount of ...

    Helping Older Loved Ones in a Heat Wave

    With much of the United States baking in extreme heat this summer, older adults and the people caring for them need to take extra precautions.

    Seniors can decline rapidly, sometimes within minutes, when exposed to soaring temperatures, said Dr. Angela Catic, an assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

    "As we get older, our bodies don't self-regulate temperature ...

    Panting Pooches: When Summer Heat Is Too Much for Your Dog

    Summer is a great time to enjoy the outdoors with your dog, but when the temperatures spike or the fireworks come out, it's time to make sure your furry best friend is having just as good a time as you are.

    When a heat wave rolls in, try to only take your dog for walks in the coolest hours of the day, advised Mark Fr...

    Stay Safe in Summer's Sizzle

    Temperatures are skyrocketing across the United States, as the high sky sun bakes everyone who ventures out for some summer fun.

    Unfortunately, these record high temperatures increase your risk of experiencing heat-related illnesses during your typical summer activities, said Dr. Maria Mejia, associate professor of fam...

    High Heat, Heavy Smog a Deadly Combo: Study

    Heat coupled with smog can be a particularly lethal mix, especially for older adults, a new study finds.

    Unfortunately, both hot temperatures and air pollution are going to increase as the planet warms, and so will deaths, researchers report.

    "We are experiencing more and more frequent wildfires, which cause pollution, and

    As Heat Waves Continue, Experts Urge Steps to Stay Safe

    As a weekend heat wave that put more than 15 million Americans in the Northern and Central Plains on alert slowly moves east, the nation's emergency doctors have advice to keep you safe.

    "Overexposure to the sun or heat can turn into an emergency faster than most people expect," said Dr. Gillian Schmitz, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). By Tuesday, the hea...

    Extreme Heat Can Bring Extreme Heart Dangers

    The record-breaking heat that's scorching much of the United States this week poses significant heart dangers, and you need to take steps to protect yourself, the American Heart Association (AHA) says.

    That's especially true for older adults and people with high blood pressure

    Both Food and Drink Keep You Hydrated for Summer Exercise

    Keeping your body well-fueled and hydrated is a must during outdoor summer sports and exercise, a nutrition expert says.

    "For summer workouts, it's important to make sure that adequate carbohydrates, fluids and electrolytes are consumed," said sports dietitian Kristen Chang, assistant director of the master's program in nutrition and dietetics at Virginia Tech University.

    "You need...

    Extreme Heat Blankets Much of America: Tips to Stay Safe

    If you're among the millions of Americans sweltering in extreme heat this week, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers some solid advice on keeping safe.

    More than 60 million people from Southern California to West Virginia and as far south as Florida are now under an excessive heat w...

    Global Warming Could Mean Less Sleep for Billions

    Anyone who's tried to sleep on a hot summer night knows how hard it is to nod off when the mercury is rising.

    So it's no surprise that global warming is likely to cost people more and more shut-eye as temperatures around the world rise.

    By the end of this century, individuals could be subjected to at least two weeks of short sleep each year due to high temperatures driven by global ...

    Workers in U.S. Southwest in Peril as Summer Temperatures Rise

    It's getting hotter and hotter outside due to global warming and, as a result, outdoor workers in southwestern states are increasingly vulnerable to heat-related illnesses.

    Making matters worse, many of these workers may not realize their health is in jeopardy.

    This is the main finding of a new study that looked at how extreme heat affects outdoor workers' health in Las Vegas, Los A...

    More Balmy Summer Nights, Higher Heart Death Rate in Men

    Warm summer nights may leave you tossing and turning in bed, but that could be the least of your worries. Just a slight rise in summer nighttime temperatures increases the risk of heart-related death for men in their 60s, a new study shows.

    "Considering the growing likelihood of

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 29, 2022
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  • Heat Waves Tied to Climate Change Are Upping U.S. Heart Deaths

    An increase in heat waves driven by climate change is causing hundreds more heart disease deaths in the United States each year, with men and Black people at particular risk, researchers say.

    Each year, the United States now has about three times as many heat waves as in the 1960s. Heat can put increased strain on the heart and trigger heart attacks and other cardiac problems.

    "Thes...

    Warming World Means More Cases of Dangerous Low-Salt Condition

    A spike in hospitalizations for a dangerous low-salt condition is the latest in a growing list of health threats linked to climate change.

    An average global temperature increase of 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit could lead to a 14% increase in hospitalizations for critically low sodium levels in the blood, a condition called hyponatremia, according to a

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  • March 14, 2022
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  • A Hotter Climate Could Trigger More Mental Health Crises

    Extreme heat from climate change is making it harder for people with mental illness and drug addiction to cope and adding to pressure on pandemic-stretched U.S. emergency rooms.

    During these severe summer temperature spikes, Americans with depression, anxiety, mood disorders and drug addiction are increasingly flocking to hospital ERs for help, a

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  • February 24, 2022
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  • Climate Change Bringing More Catastrophic Wildfires: UN Report

    Devastating wildfires around the world will only grow in number in coming decades as climate change further fuels the chances of out-of-control blazes, a landmark report from the United Nations warns.

    "The heating of the planet is turning landscapes into tinderboxes," said the

    Poor Will Be Hit Hardest by a Hotter World

    In yet another sign that climate change strikes the poorest without mercy, a new study shows that low-income people have a 40% higher exposure to heat than those with higher incomes.

    By the end of the century, heat wave exposure for the poorest 25% people worldwide will equal the rest of the global population combined. That's after ...

    Wildfires Plus Heat Make Breathing Dangerous in America's West

    Wildfires and rising temperatures are exposing more and more Americans to an air pollution double-whammy of smoke and smog, a new study warns.

    Researchers found that over the past 20 years, a growing number of people in western states have been simultaneously exposed to high levels of two kinds of air pollution: Fine-particle pollution generated by

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 12, 2022
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  • Heat Waves Bring Health Crises to the Homeless

    Add heat waves to the many health threats facing homeless people.

    Last year, the United States had 580,000 homeless people -- 28% of them in California, where seven in 10 live outdoors. That's nearly nine times more than in any other state.

    "The same weather that makes living unsheltered possible in California also exposes people experiencing homelessness to a higher risk of a wide ...