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07 Feb

Calling a Food 'Light' in Calories May Backfire

A new study finds people eat more when a meal is labeled ‘light’ as opposed to ‘filling’.

Health News Results - 168

A Hotter World Can Worsen Heart Failure

Climate change could spell trouble for those with heart failure, a new study suggests.

When the temperatures soared in France during the summer of 2019, the heat wave appears to have worsened the conditions of heart failure patients, researchers report.

"The finding is timely, given the heat waves again this year," said study a...

As Heat Continues Through Fall, Shield Yourself from UTIs

As summer gives way to fall, hot weather isn't likely to let up anytime soon, and that means it's important to stay hydrated to keep urinary tract infections at bay.

Getting dehydrated is a l...

As Thermometer Rises, So Does Hate Speech on Twitter

Internet hotheads are often literally that, with hateful tweets rising in number as temperatures soar, a new study reports.

Temperatures higher than 86 degrees Fahrenheit are consistently linked to heavy increases in online hate messages, according to a review of more than 4 billion English-language tweets.

The researchers identified a “feel-good window” between 54 and 70 degree...

Heat Waves That Threaten Lives Will Be Common by 2100

Life-threatening heat waves will become more common by the end of this century, according to a new study.

A “dangerous” heat index — what the temperature feels like when humidity and air temperature are combined — is defined by the National Weather Service (NWS) as 103 degrees Fahrenheit. NWS defines “extremely dangerous” as 124 degrees F -- unsafe to humans for any amount of ...

Too Few U.S. Cities Have Good Hurricane Evacuation Plans

This year's hurricane season has been quiet so far, but if and when it cranks up many American cities won't be prepared to execute mass evacuations, a new study finds.

After Hurricane Katrina slammed into New Orleans in 2005, the country bore witness to the pitfalls of not having an effective evacuation plan. Since then on...

Cooler Weather Could Mean More Diabetes in Dogs

Just like their humans, dogs are more often diagnosed with diabetes in certain places and times of year, new research reveals.

Diagnoses of type 1 diabetes in humans rise during the winter months and in northern latitudes of the United States. This

  • By Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 22, 2022
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  • Up Your Skin Care Routine During Hot Summer Months

    Sweating can affect your skin, so learning how to handle it should be an important part of your skin care regime, a Baylor College of Medicine aesthetician says.

    "Sweating is an important bodily function that cools you down, expels toxins...

    Wind Can Uproot Kids' Bouncy Castles, With Tragic Results

    Inflatable bounce houses are big, colorful, cheap to rent and practically scream "childhood fun." So, what could possibly go wrong?

    It turns out plenty. For one thing, the air-filled party staples are vulnerable to being blown aloft and even flipped over if left unmoored, a new study warns.

    But even when staked firmly in place, researchers warn that the biggest problem is the potent...

    Climate Change Making 218 Infectious Diseases Even Worse

    Flooding, heat waves and drought have made 58% of infectious diseases worse, a new analysis claims.

    For the review of previous studies, published Aug. 8 in the journal Nature Climate Change, researchers found that 218 of the known 375 infectious diseases have been made worse by climate change, including

    Global Warming Will Mean More Unfit, Unhealthy Kids Worldwide: Study

    Children are not as physically fit as their parents were when they were kids, and this will likely harm them as the Earth warms, new research claims.

    The findings are based on a comprehensive review of more than 150 studies that looked at how children maintain physical activity, exercise and cope with heat, as well as how thi...

    It's Hurricane Season, So Get Your Storm Medical Kit Together

    Living in a region where tropical storms, hurricanes or other weather emergencies are likely means being ready for a quick evacuation.

    "Part of preparedness is having a plan," said Dr. James McDeavitt, executive vice president and dean of clinical affairs at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. "You don't want to make that plan as the hurricane is barreling down the coast. You need to <...

    Which Americans Are Most (and Least) Prepared for Disasters?

    When hurricanes, floods and fires hit, everyone can struggle to respond and cope, but new research suggests that women, people with kids under 18, renters, the poor, and Black and Asian Americans are the most vulnerable to weather disasters.

    These groups need special help before disasters occur to make sure they're equipped to act, said lead researcher Smitha Rao, an assistant professor ...

    Weather and Arthritis: Is There Really a Connection?

    It's long been conventional wisdom that weather makes arthritis pain worse.

    The issue has been studied through the years, with conflicting findings. But three recent studies found weather does have some impact, said Dr. Robert Shmerling, writing for the Harvard Heal...

    Panting Pooches: When Summer Heat Is Too Much for Your Dog

    Summer is a great time to enjoy the outdoors with your dog, but when the temperatures spike or the fireworks come out, it's time to make sure your furry best friend is having just as good a time as you are.

    When a heat wave rolls in, try to only take your dog for walks in the coolest hours of the day, advised Mark Fr...

    Stay Safe in Summer's Sizzle

    Temperatures are skyrocketing across the United States, as the high sky sun bakes everyone who ventures out for some summer fun.

    Unfortunately, these record high temperatures increase your risk of experiencing heat-related illnesses during your typical summer activities, said Dr. Maria Mejia, associate professor of fam...

    People on Dialysis Face Higher Death Risk After Hurricanes

    A hurricane threatens anyone in its path, but it can be especially deadly for people who need kidney dialysis to survive, new research shows.

    An analysis of patient data spanning two decades linked hurricane exposure with a higher risk of death for people who routinely need dialysis, which filters and purifies ...

    High Heat, Heavy Smog a Deadly Combo: Study

    Heat coupled with smog can be a particularly lethal mix, especially for older adults, a new study finds.

    Unfortunately, both hot temperatures and air pollution are going to increase as the planet warms, and so will deaths, researchers report.

    "We are experiencing more and more frequent wildfires, which cause pollution, and

    As Heat Waves Continue, Experts Urge Steps to Stay Safe

    As a weekend heat wave that put more than 15 million Americans in the Northern and Central Plains on alert slowly moves east, the nation's emergency doctors have advice to keep you safe.

    "Overexposure to the sun or heat can turn into an emergency faster than most people expect," said Dr. Gillian Schmitz, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). By Tuesday, the hea...

    Spring's Double Trouble: Asthma Plus Seasonal Allergies

    If you have both asthma and seasonal allergies, there are ways to reduce the impacts of that double whammy, an expert says.

    People with asthma, a chronic lung condition, should try to control or prevent allergic outbreaks, said Dr. Miranda Curtiss, an assistant professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School...

    Global Warming Could Mean Less Sleep for Billions

    Anyone who's tried to sleep on a hot summer night knows how hard it is to nod off when the mercury is rising.

    So it's no surprise that global warming is likely to cost people more and more shut-eye as temperatures around the world rise.

    By the end of this century, individuals could be subjected to at least two weeks of short sleep each year due to high temperatures driven by global ...

    Workers in U.S. Southwest in Peril as Summer Temperatures Rise

    It's getting hotter and hotter outside due to global warming and, as a result, outdoor workers in southwestern states are increasingly vulnerable to heat-related illnesses.

    Making matters worse, many of these workers may not realize their health is in jeopardy.

    This is the main finding of a new study that looked at how extreme heat affects outdoor workers' health in Las Vegas, Los A...

    Climate Change Will Make Pandemics Like COVID More Likely: Report

    Planet Earth is growing hotter, forcing different animal species to migrate to new areas and interact with other unfamiliar creatures at an increasing rate.

    That phenomenon could have dire consequences to human health, a new study says, raising the odds for new viral illnesses such

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 28, 2022
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  • More Balmy Summer Nights, Higher Heart Death Rate in Men

    Warm summer nights may leave you tossing and turning in bed, but that could be the least of your worries. Just a slight rise in summer nighttime temperatures increases the risk of heart-related death for men in their 60s, a new study shows.

    "Considering the growing likelihood of

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 29, 2022
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  • As Climate Change Worsens Allergy Season, Tips on How to Cope

    Climate change is prompting longer pollen seasons and higher pollen counts, which spells trouble for people with seasonal allergies, allergists warn.

    "Allergy seasons have been changing in North America and across the globe, and we see greater changes the further you get from the equator," explained Dr. Kara Wada, an allergis...

    Heat Waves Tied to Climate Change Are Upping U.S. Heart Deaths

    An increase in heat waves driven by climate change is causing hundreds more heart disease deaths in the United States each year, with men and Black people at particular risk, researchers say.

    Each year, the United States now has about three times as many heat waves as in the 1960s. Heat can put increased strain on the heart and trigger heart attacks and other cardiac problems.

    "Thes...

    U.S. Wildfires: Much Bigger, More Frequent Now

    U.S. wildfires have become larger, more frequent and more widespread in the past two decades, and the situation will become even worse in the future, a new study warns.

    "Projected changes in climate, fuel and ignitions suggest that we'll see more and larger fires in the future," said l...

    Warming World Means More Cases of Dangerous Low-Salt Condition

    A spike in hospitalizations for a dangerous low-salt condition is the latest in a growing list of health threats linked to climate change.

    An average global temperature increase of 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit could lead to a 14% increase in hospitalizations for critically low sodium levels in the blood, a condition called hyponatremia, according to a

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  • March 14, 2022
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  • More Hurricanes Mean Rising Death Toll for Americans

    From drowning to being struck by flying debris, the immediate dangers of hurricanes are well known, but these events also boost your risk of dying from a host of hidden diseases and conditions that occur in the storm's aftermath.

    The new research is concerning given the increase in t...

    Fewer Rainy Days Are Bringing Earlier Springs

    Never mind what the calendar says -- your plants will tell you when spring is here.

    And even in Northern regions, they're leafing out earlier than ever in recent decades due to climate change. In a new study, researchers attribute the early greening to two key factors: warmer temperatures and fewer rainy days...

    A Hotter Climate Could Trigger More Mental Health Crises

    Extreme heat from climate change is making it harder for people with mental illness and drug addiction to cope and adding to pressure on pandemic-stretched U.S. emergency rooms.

    During these severe summer temperature spikes, Americans with depression, anxiety, mood disorders and drug addiction are increasingly flocking to hospital ERs for help, a

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  • February 24, 2022
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  • Winter Storms Bring Carbon Monoxide Danger to Homes

    With winter storms roaring through much of the United States this week, millions of Americans may face power outages that could put them at risk of carbon monoxide poisoning and fires as they try to keep warm, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission warns.

    When the power goes out, many people use portable generators or other devices for heat and power, but improper use of such equipme...

    Take These Winter Workout Tips to Heart

    Tempted to take your workout into the great outdoors?

    Be aware that there are both benefits and risks to exercising outdoors during the winter.

    "There's actually some advantages to working out in cold weather -- with no heat and humidity to deal with you may be a...

    Carbon Monoxide Deaths Soar During Power Outages

    Power outages are becoming more frequent in the United States, and a new study highlights one consequence of prolonged blackouts: carbon monoxide poisonings.

    Looking at major U.S. power outages between 2007 and 2018, researchers found that carbon monoxide poisonings spiked during those disruptions, versus the days immediately before.

    The pattern is not surprising, said lead researc...

    Don't Snow Shovel Your Way to a Heart Attack

    Shoveling snow may trigger a heart attack if you're not careful, especially if you already have risk factors, an expert warns.

    The combination of shoveling and cold weather can cause your arteries to spasm and constrict, explained Dr. Sam Kazziha, chief of cardiovascular...

    Rain or Shine, Allergies Are Tough. What's the Link to Weather?

    If you think frequent changes in weather are triggering your allergy symptoms, you may be right.

    A shift from a cold front to a rainy day then back to warm weather can have an impact on those with allergies, said Dr. David Corry, professor of medicine-immunology, allergy and rheumatology at Baylor College of Medicine, in ...

    Weak Action on Climate Change Is Stressing Young People Worldwide

    While climate change calls to mind extreme weather and melting polar ice caps, government officials' inaction to stop it is also affecting the mental health of young people, new research reveals.

    "This study paints a horrific picture of widespread climate anxiety in our children and young peo...

    Heat Waves Bring Health Crises to the Homeless

    Add heat waves to the many health threats facing homeless people.

    Last year, the United States had 580,000 homeless people -- 28% of them in California, where seven in 10 live outdoors. That's nearly nine times more than in any other state.

    "The same weather that makes living unsheltered possible in California also exposes people experiencing homelessness to a higher risk of a wide ...

    Shoveling Snow? Beware of Heart Hazards

    Don't let a picture-perfect snowfall turn deadly.

    Shoveling snow can cause heart attacks or sudden cardiac arrest in folks with heart conditions and even in those who are unaware that they have heart disease, the American Heart Association (AHA) warns.

    "Shoveli...

    City Living Is Hotter With Urban 'Heat Penalty'

    Summer can sizzle in the city, but a new report finds urban living is getting hotter than ever before.

    The research shows that city dwellers may be suffering from what scientists call an urban ...

    Heat Waves Far More Frequent Now Than in 1980s

    Large, simultaneous heat waves have become much more common in northern regions worldwide due to climate change and could have disastrous consequences, researchers warn.

    The investigators also found that these concurrent heat waves are becoming larger and hotter.

    "More than one heat wave occurring at the same time often has worse societal impacts than a single event," said lead stud...

    Silent Killers: Space Heaters, Generators Bring Carbon Monoxide Danger

    If you're among the many people who use space heaters and generators during the winter, you need to guard against fire and carbon monoxide (CO) hazards, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says.

    In the United States, that's especially true for Black Amer...

    Carbon Monoxide From Generators Can Be Silent Killer After Disasters

    The deadly tornadoes that devastated communities in multiple states this past weekend have destroyed many homes and left others without power.

    But if people turn to generators to manage in the aftermath, they should use caution, the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) warns.

    Portable generators can expose users to increased risk of

  • Cara Murez
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  • December 15, 2021
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  • Windy Days Are Safer Days When It Comes to COVID-19

    If you're getting together with others outdoors, a windy day might be best, researchers say.

    The investigators found that when people socialize outside, the risk of coronavirus infection is as much as 45% greater when there's hardly any breeze than when there are stronger winds.

    "The issue is really about an increased danger of infection spread in the presence of stale air as oppose...

    Hot Days Can Send Even Younger Folks to the ER

    Extreme heat brings a jump in emergency room visits by adults of all ages, a new study shows.

    While it's well known that extreme heat puts adults aged 65 and older at increased risk of hospitalization and death, it's been less clear how it affects young and middle-aged adults.

    To find out, the researchers analyzed the associations between heat and ER visits among more than 74 millio...

    Climate Change May Not Increase Allergies in Kids With Asthma: Study

    While climate change gets a lot of notice for its numerous negative impacts around the globe, children's allergies may not be among them.

    Despite climate change, with the longer growing seasons and larger pollen loads that are attributed to it, more than 5,800 children in the Los Angeles area with asthma did not have an increase in allergic sensitization or allergy diagnosis over a 15-yea...

    Biggest Driver of Infectious Disease Outbreaks: Water

    Contaminated water is the leading cause of large-scale outbreaks of infectious diseases that can be transmitted from animals to people, researchers say.

    These health threats are called zoonotic infectious diseases, and recent outbreaks include COVID-19 and Ebola.

    "In the age of COVID-19, it is understandable that many people may not realize how many outbreaks of other infectious dis...

    Brazil Study Shows Climate Change's Deadly Impact on Kidneys

    Global warming may pose a threat to your kidneys, new research suggests.

    For the study, researchers analyzed data from hospitals in more than 1,800 cities in Brazil between 2000 and 2015, and found that just over 7% of all admissions for kidney disease could be attributed to hotter temperatures.

    That equates to more than 202,000 cases of kidney disease, according to the report publi...

    Climate Change Is Already Harming Many Americans' Health: Report

    Climate change is already making Americans sick and researchers warn that the nation must take swift action to protect people's well-being.

    "Climate change effects aren't just an abstraction, something that will happen years from now. They are happening today, and they impact every aspect of your health, from the air you breathe [more smoke, more pollen] to the nutritional quality of the ...

    Is Sheltering Under an Overpass Safe When Tornadoes Strike?

    You're driving down the highway when a tornado warning is issued over your car radio. Is it safe to follow widespread advice and seek shelter under an overpass?

    While the U.S. National Weather Service warns that the wind from a tornado can accelerate as it flows under the overpass, creating a wind tunnel effect, a new study found differently.

    "In our research, there is no one findin...

    Climate Change Could Bring Rising Obesity Rates

    You can add obesity and its related health risks to the long list of threats posed by climate change, researchers report.

    In a new review, researchers from Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia outlined the association between climate change and obesity.

    As global temperatures increase, people may become less physically active and less able to burn excess fat, putting them at incr...

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