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Results for search "Surgery: Misc.".

Health News Results - 211

White Men's Grip on U.S. Health Care May Be Slipping

TUESDAY, July 20, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. medical field is less dominated by white men than it used to be, but there are still few Black and Hispanic doctors, dentists and pharmacists, a new study finds.

The study, which looked at trends over the past 20 years, found that white men no longer make up the majority of physicians and surgeons in the United States....

One-Dose Blood Thinner Could Slash Blood Clot Risk After Knee Replacement

Anyone who's ever undergone knee replacement understands the real and troubling risk of post-op blood clots. Many patients are told take a daily blood thinner pill long after their procedure.

But a new study finds that a one-time injection of an experimental blood thinner called abelacimab may greatly reduce the odds for these clots in recovering knee replacement patients.

The rese...

Pope Leaves Hospital 10 Days After Colon Surgery

Ten days after surgery to remove half of his colon, Pope Francis has been discharged from a Rome hospital.

The Associated Press reported that a car carrying Francis, 84, left Rome's Gemelli Polytechnic hospital and traveled to the Vatican on Wednesday morning.

After being diagnosed with diverticular stenosis, a severe narrowing of the large intestine, half of the pope's col...

Black Men Less Likely to Get Best Prostate Cancer Treatments

Black American military veterans with aggressive prostate cancer who would benefit from surgery or radiation are less likely to get those treatments than men of other races, despite equal access to health care, a new study finds.

"Despite great strides in prostate cancer care over the past few decades, racial disparities in care persist, and there remains a lot to be done to better unders...

Clot-Removing Procedure Can Sometimes Backfire for Stroke Patients

When someone suffers a stroke, doctors can often remove the culprit clot obstructing blood flow to the brain. Now, a new study sheds light on why those successful procedures do not always translate into a good outcome.

Researchers found that when clot retrieval takes more than one attempt, stroke patients are more likely to still have some degree of disability three months later.

An...

People Over 80 Benefit From Surgery for Benign Brain Tumors

Surgery for the most common type of benign brain tumor should be considered for patients 80 and older, Finnish researchers say.

Meningiomas originate in the meninges surrounding the brain, and the primary treatment is surgery. But the risks of operating increase with age, so surgery for meningioma patients who are 80 and older is rare in most countries, according to University of Helsinki...

Alligator Attack Nearly Cost This Firefighter Dad His Arm

You might not believe it, but Florida firefighter Carsten Kieffer was incredibly lucky when a 12-foot alligator leapt into his boat and chomped down on his right forearm.

Just about no one else thought so, and that went double for Kieffer: Both main bones in his arm were broken, and a big bite had been taken out of the back of his forearm. After the attack, the arm essentially dangled fro...

Red Cross Warns of Severe Blood Shortage

There's a severe blood shortage in the United States due to a recent surge in trauma cases, organ transplants and elective surgeries, the American Red Cross says.

The Red Cross is appealing to Americans to roll up their sleeves and donate blood immediately.

"Our teams are working around the clock to meet the extraordinary blood needs of hospitals and patients -- distributing about 7...

Many U.S. Seniors May Need Better Knee Arthritis Care

Just a fraction of older Americans with arthritic knees try physical therapy, pain-relieving injections or other more conservative measures before undergoing knee replacement surgery, new research shows.

And this may be driven by what type of doctor they see to treat their achy knees, as well as where they live, the study findings suggest.

Knee osteoarthritis occurs when the cartila...

Cataracts: Common, and Easy to Treat

Many aging Americans can have their vision dimmed by cataracts, but the good news is that they're easily treated, one expert says.

By age 80, half of Americans either have cataracts or have had surgery to remove them, according to Dr. Waid Blackstone, an ophthalmologist at University of Alabama at Birmingham Callahan Eye Hospital Clinic at Pell City.

"In terms of the typical age-rel...

Old Age No Bar to Successful Heart Transplant, Study Finds

People over 70 are far less likely to be considered for or to receive a new heart -- even though new research suggests their survival rates after transplant are similar to those of younger patients.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data on more than 57,000 adults (aged 18 and older) listed as heart transplant surgery candidates in the United States between January 2000 and August 2...

Can You Keep Your Bladder After Bladder Cancer Strikes?

After being diagnosed with bladder cancer, some patients face an almost impossible decision -- have their bladder removed or take a risk knowing that the cancer may be more likely to spread if the bladder is left intact.

But what if there was another way?

For David Cabelis, 68, the decision was more straightforward than most, as he had a unique opportunity to take part in a clinical...

Don't Delay Lung Cancer Surgery, Study Suggests

Surgery soon after a diagnosis of early-stage lung cancer is crucial in reducing the risk of recurrence and death, a new study finds.

"Patients with early-stage cancer have the best chance for survival," said senior author Dr. Varun Puri, a thoracic surgeon and professor of surgery at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "That's why it's critical for patients to promptly...

Many Pre-Surgery Tests Are Useless, So Why Are Hospitals Still Using Them?

Patients facing relatively simple outpatient surgeries are nonetheless being told to undergo a number of preoperative tests that just aren't necessary, a new study reports.

More than half of a group of patients facing low-risk outpatient surgery received one or more tests -- blood work, urinalysis, an electrocardiogram (EKG), a chest X-ray -- prior to their operation.

One-third of p...

What Surgery Works Best for Advanced Ankle Arthritis?

For patients with severe ankle arthritis, total ankle replacement provides better function over the long haul than the traditional surgical treatment, a new study finds.

Researchers assessed outcomes in 517 patients with end-stage ankle arthritis - meaning they have a complete loss of cartilage resulting in "bone-on-bone" contact in the ankle joint. The result is pain and stiffness.

What Type of Stent Did I Get, Where? Most Heart Patients Don't Know

When someone comes in for a new heart stent, it's critical that the medical team doing the procedure knows several key facts about previous stents the patient has had.

But fewer than half of patients receiving a stent were still carrying the stent card that has those details with them, a new study finds.

Most of them - about 88% - do carry their phones, according to study author D...

Surgical Snip Might Prevent Stroke in People With A-fib

A simple surgery may help lower the risk for strokes by more than a third in patients with atrial fibrillation, a common irregular heartbeat, a new trial finds.

The reduction in stroke risk is achieved by blocking the left atrial appendage, an unused, finger-like tissue that traps blood in the upper chamber of the heart and increases the risk of clots that can cause strokes, the researche...

U.S. Seniors Are Getting Fewer Abdominal Surgeries

Older Americans, especially those 85 and older, are having fewer abdominal surgeries than in decades past, a new study finds.

The study examined data from 2002 to 2014, and was not able to tell the exact reasons for the trend. It might be that improvements in medical treatments and cancer screening for older adults are reducing the need for invasive surgeries, the researchers said.
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Most Top U.S. Surgeons Are White and That's Not Changing

White people continue to dominate top surgery positions at U.S. universities, while the number of Black and Hispanic surgeons remains flat, a new study finds.

"There are a lot of talented surgeons of different races, ethnicities and genders who do wonderful work and are being underrecognized or not recognized at all. And that's contributed to a lot of frustration," study co-author Dr. Jos...

How the Pandemic Changed Breast Cancer Care

As the COVID-19 pandemic unfolded, breast cancer experts realized space in operating rooms and hospitals could become scarce. That meant rethinking standard care, to provide the best way to treat patients under these suddenly restricted conditions.

One of the new ideas: Reverse the order of care given to patients with a type of breast cancer known as estrogen receptor-positive (ER+). ER+ ...

Gender-Affirming Surgeries Improve Mental Health in Young, Study Says

When gender-diverse or transgender people have surgeries to affirm their gender, they experience a variety of positive mental health outcomes, new research shows.

The study found an association between the surgeries, which participants had at least two years prior to a survey, and significantly lower rates of past-month psychological distress, past-year suicidal ideation and past-year smo...

'Nerve Zap' Pain Treatment Could Cut Need for Opioids After Surgeries

An emerging technology could zap your post-op pain away -- little or no opioids needed.

The technique is called percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation. It involves inserting a small wire next to a nerve and using a stimulator to deliver a mild electrical current to the affected area, interrupting pain transmission.

A team led by Dr. Brian Ilfeld, of the University of California, ...

Breast Cancer Over 70: How Much Treatment Is Enough?

Many women older than 70 can safely receive fewer treatments for early-stage breast cancer, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that adding lymph node removal or radiation to women's treatment did not seem to cut their risk of a breast cancer recurrence, which was low overall.

The findings, experts said, support existing recommendations to "de-escalate" those procedures for many...

Non-Emergency Surgeries Are Rebounding, But Backlogs Remain

The coronavirus pandemic put elective ear, nose and throat surgeries in the United States on the back burner last spring, but a new study finds those numbers largely rebounded within a few months.

Still, "as the pandemic continues, we've noted that otolaryngology surgeries are still backlogged and this impacts the health and well-being of patients," said study senior author Dr. C. Matthew...

Surgery Can Boost Outcomes After Chemo for People With Pancreatic Cancer

Even in patients with stage 2 pancreatic cancer, surgery is typically worthwhile after chemotherapy, because it appears to extend patients' lives, a new study concludes.

In stage 2 cancer, the tumor has already grown large enough to be close to vessels that supply blood to nearby organs, such as the liver or intestines.

That can complicate surgeries and cause doctors to hesitate go...

Black Patients Often Treated at Hospitals With Poorer Safety Records: Report

Compared with white patients, Black adults are at a distinct disadvantage when it comes to hospital safety in the United States, a new report warns.

Black patients are significantly less likely to gain access to "high-quality" hospitals, an Urban Institute analysis found. As a result, they're much more likely to undergo surgical procedures in facilities with relatively poor safety records...

Smoking Rates High Among Surgery Patients

U.S. surgery patients have a high rate of smoking, which could be one reason why some wind up on the operating table, researchers say.

A look at nearly 329,000 Michigan residents who had common surgical procedures between 2012 and 2019 found that nearly a quarter had smoked in the past year. In comparison, just over 14% of U.S. adults smoked in 2019.

The highest rates of smoking wer...

Most Post-Surgical Opioids Go Unused: Study

Using cellphones to track patients' painkiller use, a new study found more than 60% of opioid painkillers prescribed to surgical patients after their procedures went unused.

That has implications for the ongoing epidemic of opioid misuse in the United States, where unused medications can be diverted to others. Giving surgical patients only the amount of pills they need could help curb the...

Postpartum Bleeding Doesn't Have to Mean Hysterectomy, Experts Say

Heavy bleeding following birth can threaten the life of the mother, and doctors at times turn to a hysterectomy to end the bleeding. But a new study suggests a less invasive, underused procedure might be a better, less drastic option.

Investigators determined that when postpartum bleeding occurs, hysterectomies -- the removal of the uterus -- are 60% more common than uterine ...

Knee Replacement a Good Option, Even for Severely Obese: Study

Total knee replacement is a cost-effective treatment for extremely obese people with knee osteoarthritis, a new study claims.

The painful condition affects more than 14 million U.S. adults, and total knee replacement is often recommended to treat advanced knee osteoarthritis.

However, concerns about increased risks of poor wound healing, infection and implant failure make some ...

Lab-Made Heart Valves Can Grow Along With Youngest Heart Patients

Lab-created heart valves that grow with the recipient could spare kids born with heart defects from the repeated valve-replacement surgeries they now endure.

University of Minnesota researchers found that lab-created valves implanted in young lambs for a year were capable of growing within the recipient.

"This is a huge step forward in pediatric heart research," said senior research...

Surgical Patients Allergic to Penicillin Have Another Safe Alternative

The antibiotic cefazolin is a safe alternative to prevent infection in most surgical patients who are allergic to penicillin, according to a new study.

Cefazolin is a type of antibiotic known as a cephalosporin. It's the recommended antibiotic for most surgical procedures, but some doctors are reluctant to give it to patients with penicillin-allergies based on research from the 1960s and ...

Need an Operation? Here's How COVID Has Changed Surgery

This year, COVID-19 has made decisions around surgery tougher than ever for folks who may need one. But one major medical group can help provide some answers.

Top on their list: Is it safe to have surgery right now?

"It is very safe to have surgery, especially with all of the precautions in place," said Dr. Beverly Philip, president of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)...

Is It Safe to Have Surgery Soon After a COVID Diagnosis?

If you have surgery scheduled and you just found out you are infected with COVID-19, new research suggests you should push your operation back by at least seven weeks.

Why? Because not doing so could raise your risk of postoperative death, British scientists warn.

"We found that patients operated [on] 0 to 6 weeks after SARS-CoV-2 infection diagnosis are at increased risk of postope...

For Amputees, a New Kind of Surgery May Allow Better Control, Sensation

A new type of surgery offers amputees better control of muscles that remain after surgery, and of their prosthetic limbs, its inventors say.

The standard surgical approach to amputation has changed little since the American Civil War, according to developers of the new approach. In their small study, the new procedure also helped curb pain and sensations like the troubling "phantom limb" ...

Had Sinus Surgery? Better Skip Nasal Swab COVID Test

If you've had major sinus or skull base surgery, you should talk with your ear, nose and throat doctor before getting a COVID-19 nasal swab test, researchers advise.

It's also crucial for health workers performing swab testing to ask whether the patient has had extensive sinus or skull base surgery, said Dr. Philip Chen, an associate professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at th...

'Rerouting' Brain Blood Flow: Old Technique Could Be New Advance Against Strokes

Doctors are testing a decades-old surgical technique as a new way to treat certain stroke patients. And the preliminary results look promising, they say.

At issue are strokes caused by intracranial atherosclerosis, where blood vessels within the brain become hardened and narrowed.

Strokes occur when the blood supply to the brain is disrupted, depriving tissue of oxygen and nutrients...

Tiger Woods Hospitalized Following Car Crash

Golfing legend Tiger Woods is in the hospital after his car flipped over in a Los Angeles neighborhood on Tuesday morning.

"Tiger Woods was in a single-car accident this morning in California where he suffered multiple leg injuries. He is currently in surgery, and we thank you for your privacy and support," Woods' agent Mark Steinberg said in a statement, the Washington Post repo...

Fetal Surgery Is Changing Lives for Kids With Spina Bifida

Spina bifida is a diagnosis no parents-to-be want to hear as they await their child's birth, and the idea of performing surgery on a baby while it is still in the womb can be terrifying. But new research shows that performing the delicate procedure before the baby is born, and not after, is worth it.

The findings showed that children with myelomeningocele (the most severe form of spina bi...

Bedside Manner Even More Important for Hospital Patients Admitted Via the ER

Being rushed into hospital care can be an emotional experience. So, what a surgeon says to trauma or emergency surgery patients plays a role in how satisfied they are after their operations, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 187,000 patients discharged from 168 HCA Healthcare hospitals in the United States in 2018 and 2019. HCA Healthcare is a publicly traded compan...

'So Happy:' World's First Hand/Face Transplant Patient Doing Well

Joe DiMeo's life changed forever when he fell asleep at the wheel on U.S. Route 22 in New Jersey on July 14, 2018.

The horrific crash left him with third-degree burns on 80% of his body and a grim prognosis.

Now, more than two years later, DiMeo, 22, is the recipient of the world's first successful double hand and face transplant, and on the road to recovery.

The historic surg...

Pandemic Cut U.S. Heart Surgeries in Half as Patients Avoided Hospitals

There has been a sharp decline in heart surgeries and an increase in heart surgery patient deaths in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers say.

An analysis of national data revealed a 53% decrease in all adult heart surgeries, including a 40% decline in non-elective heart surgeries and a 65% drop in elective heart surgeries during the pandemic, compared to 2019.

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Knee Procedure Done Earlier Might Prevent Knee Replacement Later

For some patients suffering from knee arthritis, a special procedure may reduce the need for a total knee replacement, Canadian researchers say.

By getting what is known as a 'high tibial osteotomy,' younger patients with less severe joint damage who are physically active might be able to delay the need for a knee replacement by 10 years or more, though they may have to search for a doct...

Music Could Be a Post-Op Panacea, Study Finds

Heart surgery can be stressful, but researchers may have found a way to reduce patients' anxiety and postoperative pain -- without any extra side effects.

A team from the Netherlands found that the simple act of listening to music around the time of surgery may help patients as they recover.

"This is a fascinating question for heart surgeons because we perform the most invasive proc...

Kids Aren't Scared by Medical Workers' PPE, Study Finds

Kids aren't scared when surgical staff wear personal protective equipment (PPE), and many feel reassured by use of the gear, researchers say.

Anxiety is common before, during and after surgery, and can result in complications such as pain and delayed recovery. Concerns have been raised that seeing staffers wearing PPE such as hoods, masks and gowns during the coronavirus pandemic might in...

Estrogen Taken During Gender-Affirming Surgeries Won't Raise Blood Clot Risk: Study

Most transgender women can safely continue their estrogen treatments during gender-affirming surgery, a new study finds.

Estrogen therapy and surgery can increase the risk of blood clots, so experts have suggested that transgender women stop taking the hormone when having gender-affirming surgery.

But the sudden loss of estrogen was sometimes very uncomfortable, causing symptoms sim...

More Breast Cancer Survivors Opting for 'Going Flat' After Mastectomy

When journalist Catherine Guthrie learned that she would need to have a mastectomy following a breast cancer diagnosis, she was shocked by what seemed like a cursory explanation from her surgeon about what would happen next.

That included removing both of her breasts, adding implants, and moving a muscle from her back to her chest to make the results look more natural. It didn't feel righ...

'Awareness' Under C-Section Anesthesia May Be Less Rare Than Thought

It's a woman's worst nightmare: You're having a C-section under anesthesia, but you suddenly become aware of what is happening during your surgery.

Now, a new study shows that phenomenon, known as "accidental awareness," is more common than believed. In fact, it may occur in 1 in 256 women who have obstetric surgery and some may suffer long-term psychological harm.

Accidental a...

Kids With Congenital Heart Disease Face Higher Odds of Mental Health Issues

Kids born with heart defects may be more likely to develop anxiety, depression and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), regardless of the severity of their heart condition.

Congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defect in the United States, affecting about 40,000 babies a year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The defects...

Surgery Could Boost Survival for Women With Advanced Breast Cancers: Study

Women with advanced breast cancer who undergo surgery to remove the tumor after chemotherapy or another type of systemic treatment may live longer than those who don't have surgery, a new study suggests.

The findings challenge a long-held belief that surgery confers little benefit for women with stage 4 breast cancer unless the cancer is causing pain, bleeding or other symptoms. Stage 4 i...