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Results for search "Heart Failure".

Health News Results - 102

Hearts From Drug Abusers Can Be Used for Transplants

THURSDAY, July 29, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- In a finding that could mean more patients desperate for a heart transplant get a new lease on life, two new studies show that hearts from donors who abused drugs can be safely donated.

In the past two decades, the U.S. opioid crisis has taken the lives of hundreds of thousands of Americans -- often young, otherwise healthy pe...

Primary Care Doctors Often Miss Heart Failure in Women, Black Patients

White men are more likely to a receive correct and timely diagnosis of heart failure in their primary care doctor's office compared to other types of patients, new research shows.

The serious and common heart ailment is too often missed in women, Blacks and poorer people when they see their health care provider for a regular appointment, the Stanford University researchers said.

T...

The Heat Is On: Staying Safe When Temperatures Soar


Midsummer heat and high humidity aren't just uncomfortable -- they're a combo that can cause serious illness and even death.

"Whenever you walk or do outdoor activity, take a friend with you who can help you if you run into trouble," Dr. Eleanor Dunham advised. She's an emergency medicine doctor at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pa.

Babies and sen...

Meth Abuse Drove Huge Surge in Heart Failure Crises in California

WEDNESDAY, July 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- In a finding that demonstrates methamphetamine's power to destroy the human heart, new research shows hospitalizations for heart failure related to the illicit drug have soared by 585% in California.

"Our study results should bring urgent attention to this insidious, yet rapidly growing, form of severe heart failure — metha...

Pig Study Could Lead to Gene Therapy to Prevent Heart Failure

THURSDAY, July 1, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A gene therapy aimed at freeing the heart's capacity for self-repair has shown early promise in an animal study.

The study -- done in pigs -- found that the treatment approach was not only feasible, but also improved the animals' heart function after they sustained heart attack damage.

There is a long way to go befor...

CRISPR Therapy Fights Rare Disease Where Protein Clogs Organs

TUESDAY, June 29, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Early research suggests that CRISPR gene-editing technology may some day lead to dramatic relief for patients struggling with amyloidosis, a rare but serious disease that can trigger organ failure.

"There are many different types of amyloidosis," explained study author Dr. Julian Gillmore, a researcher in medicine with the Cent...

Heart Failure Patients May Be at Higher Cancer Risk

Living with heart failure is hard enough, but a new study suggests that these patients may also face a higher risk of cancer.

Researchers looked at more than 100,000 heart failure patients and the same number of people without heart failure. Their average age was just over 72 and none had cancer at the start of the study.

Over 10 years of follow-up, cancer rates were 25.7% among he...

Odds for Death, Hospital Care Rise When Statins Are Stopped

Living longer often means living with multiple health problems and numerous medications to manage them. Understandably, many doctors and their patients wonder if any of these drugs can be discontinued safely.

A new study from Italy suggests statins should not be culled from the list.

Among more than 29,000 adults 65 and older, those who stopped taking these cholesterol-lowering drug...

There Is No 'Healthy Obesity,' Study Finds

There is no such thing as healthy obesity, a Scottish study reports.

A normal metabolic profile doesn't mean an obese person is actually healthy, because he or she still has an increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke and respiratory illness, University of Glasgow researchers explained.

"The term 'metabolically healthy obesity' should be avoided in clinical medicine as it i...

Old Age No Bar to Successful Heart Transplant, Study Finds

People over 70 are far less likely to be considered for or to receive a new heart -- even though new research suggests their survival rates after transplant are similar to those of younger patients.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data on more than 57,000 adults (aged 18 and older) listed as heart transplant surgery candidates in the United States between January 2000 and August 2...

Many Heart Disease Patients Keep Smoking, Despite Knowing Risks

Smoking cigarettes or using other tobacco products increases heart risks, but that doesn't stop some Americans with a history of heart problems, new research finds.

Many continue to smoke after having a heart attack, heart failure or stroke even though they are aware of the risk.

Nearly 30% of adults with a history of these heart problems smoked when a five-year study began in 2013....

Fat Around Your Heart Could Be Especially Deadly

Too much fat around your heart could increase your risk of heart failure, especially if you're a woman, researchers warn.

They looked at nearly 7,000 45- to 84-year-olds across the United States who had no evidence of heart disease on initial CT scans. Over more than 17 years of followup, nearly 400 developed heart failure.

High amounts of fat around the heart -- pericardial fat -- ...

Heart Issue Spotted in a Few Young COVID Vaccine Recipients; Experts Say Shots Still Needed

A small number of teens and young adults have experienced heart inflammation after receiving mRNA COVID-19 vaccines produced by Pfizer and Moderna, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports.

The CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) said that it has received "relatively few" reports of the condition, known as myocarditis, among younger people who rece...

Starting Rehab Earlier Boosts Outcomes for Heart Failure Patients

Getting heart failure patients into cardiac rehabilitation sooner rather than later after a hospitalization is tied to a better prognosis, new research shows.

"Typically, cardiac rehabilitation programs require patients to be stable for six weeks after a hospitalization," explained cardiologist Dr. Benjamin Hirsh, who wasn't connected to the new research.

"This study challenges this...

Depression Even More Common With Heart Failure Than Cancer

People with heart failure are 20% more likely than those with cancer to develop depression within five years of their diagnosis, a new study finds.

Nearly 1 in 4 patients with heart failure are depressed or anxious, according to the German researchers.

"The treatment of mental illnesses in cancer patients -- psycho-oncology -- is long-established, but similar services for heart pati...

Breathing Other People's Smoke Can Raise Your Odds for Heart Failure

Exposure to secondhand smoke may up your odds for heart failure, a new study warns.

Researchers analyzed nationwide survey data from more than 11,000 nonsmokers (average age: 48) who were followed from 1988 to 1994. Nearly 1 in 5 had lab test evidence of exposure to secondhand smoke.

Nonsmokers with recent exposure were 35% more likely to develop heart failure than those with none, ...

COVID-19 Could Raise Odds for Heart Failure, Even in Those With No Prior Heart Risk

In rare cases, people hospitalized for COVID-19 can develop heart failure, even if their hearts were previously healthy, new research shows.

The researchers found that of over 6,400 COVID-19 patients at their hospital, 0.6% newly developed heart failure. That included eight patients -- mostly relatively young men -- with no history of heart disease or risk factors for it.

Heart fail...

Energy Drink Habit Led to Heart Failure in a Young Man

Energy drinks provide millions with a quick, caffeinated boost, but one young man's story could be a warning about overconsumption, experts say.

In the case of the 21-year-old, daily heavy intake of these drinks may have led to life-threatening heart and kidney failure, British doctors reported April 15 in BMJ Case Reports.

The young man reported drinking an average of four...

Cycling During Dialysis? It Might Help Patients

Dialysis is time-consuming, making it hard for kidney failure patients to keep fit. But cycling during treatment sessions could boost patients' heart health and cut medical costs, new research shows.

Dialysis can lead to long-term scarring of the heart, which can eventually lead to heart failure, so British researchers decided to find out if exercise could reduce these side effects.

'Heart-in-a-Box' Can Be Lifesaving, Matching Up Distant Donors With Patients

A few days after his 74th birthday, Don Stivers received his dream gift -- a new heart.

"I was born with a very lousy heart," he explained. "Growing up, I decided I was going to overcome it and go to the Olympics and be a strong boy. And so everything I did was against doctors' orders. They said don't run, don't do this, but I did anyway, and I would turn blue and pass out, and my mother...

Fish Oil, Vitamin D Won't Prevent A-Fib: Study

For people hoping to prevent the heart rhythm disorder known as "a-fib," new research shows that taking vitamin D or fish oil supplements won't help.

A-fib, also known as atrial fibrillation, affects more than 33 million people worldwide and is the most common type of abnormal heart rhythm. It can cause symptoms that affect a person's quality of life, result in blood clots that can cause ...

Does COVID Harm the Heart? New Study Says Maybe Not

Does COVID-19 help create heart problems, or are people with preexisting heart issues simply more prone to getting the illness?

The issue remains unclear, with a new British study finding that people with heart problems appear to have an increased risk of contracting COVID-19.

"In this research, we've discovered that poorer heart structure and function is linked to a higher risk of...

Workouts Boost Health of People With Kidney Disease

Do you struggle with chronic kidney disease? Exercise may be the best prescription for your condition, new research out of Taiwan suggests.

Scientists found that highly active patients had a lower risk of kidney disease progression, heart problems and death.

The study looked at more than 4,500 people with chronic kidney disease between 2004 and 2017. None were on dialysis. The pati...

High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy Could Affect Women's Hearts Long Term

Pregnancy-related high blood pressure can lead to long-term heart risks, new research shows.

Compared to those with normal blood pressure during pregnancy, women who developed blood pressure disorders such as preeclampsia and gestational hypertension had significant differences in heart structure and function a decade after giving birth.

These differences mainly affect the heart's l...

Heart Damage Seen in Many Hospitalized COVID Patients: Study

Heart damage was found in more than half of a group of hospitalized COVID-19 patients after they were discharged, according to a new British study.

The study included 148 patients who were treated for severe COVID-19 at six hospitals in London. The patients all had raised levels of a protein called troponin, which is released into the blood when the heart muscle is injured.

Many hos...

Daily Coffee Tied to Lower Risk for Heart Failure

Fill up that mug: Having one or more cups of caffeinated coffee a day may reduce your risk of heart failure, new research suggests.

There was one caveat, however: Decaffeinated coffee doesn't appear to provide the same protection as caffeine-rich blends.

"The association between caffeine and heart failure risk reduction was surprising," admitted study senior author Dr. David Kao. "C...

Fried Food a Big Factor in Heart Disease, Stroke

Delicious but deadly: Eating fried food is tied to an increased risk of heart disease and stroke, a new study suggests.

The risk rises with each additional 4-ounce serving per week, a research team in China found.

For the study, the investigators analyzed 19 previously published studies. They combined data from 17 studies, involving more than 560,000 people with nearly 37,000 major...

Death Risk Nearly Doubles When COVID Strikes People With Heart Failure

Patients who suffer from acute heart failure may be nearly twice as likely to die if they get COVID-19, a new study finds.

"Our results support prioritizing heart failure patients for COVID-19 vaccination once it is available," said researcher Dr. Amardeep Dastidar, a consultant interventional cardiologist at North Bristol NHS Trust and Bristol Heart Institute in England. "In the meantime...

COVID Can Harm the Infant Heart

An infant diagnosed with COVID-19 showed signs of reversible heart injury and heart failure, according to a new case report.

Researchers found the 2-month-old baby experienced heart issues similar to those seen in adults. The infant later recovered and was released with no heart medications.

The report was published Dec. 2 in the journal JACC: Case Reports.

"The ...

Women Have Poorer Survival Than Men in Years After First Heart Attack

Here's a good reason for women to take a heart attack more seriously than they might: A new study shows that women are more likely to develop heart failure or die within five years of their first severe heart attack than men are.

Though the gender gap was narrower for a less severe type of heart attack, that wasn't true with a more severe type, according to Canadian researchers who d...

Sitting Raises Women's Odds for Heart Failure

Too much sitting or lying down significantly increases older women's risk of hospitalization for heart failure, even if they get recommended amounts of physical activity, a new study warns.

"These findings are consistent with other studies confirming that people with more daily sedentary time are more likely to develop chronic health conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, heart...

Audio Messages Can Help Boost Heart Failure Care

After hospital discharge, audio messages about self-care can reduce heart failure patients' risk of rehospitalization and death, new research suggests.

Patients may not absorb instructions provided before they leave the hospital, explained study co-author Nancy Albert, a clinical nurse specialist at the Kaufman Center for Heart Failure at the Cleveland Clinic. So, "we needed a new way to ...

Restful Sleep Could Help Ward Off Heart Failure

People who regularly get a good night's sleep may help protect themselves from heart failure, a large, new study suggests.

Researchers found that of over 400,000 adults, those with the healthiest sleep patterns were 42% less likely to develop heart failure over 10 years, versus people with the least healthy habits.

Those "healthy" sleepers reported five things: Getting seven to eigh...

New Hope for a Rare Heart Condition

An experimental drug might improve heart function for people with a condition called obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a new study finds.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a thickening of heart muscle that can obstruct blood flow. The new drug, mavacamten, improves heart structure, reduces stiffness of the heart muscle and restores normal mitral valve motion, researchers said. The mit...

Many Older Americans With Heart Failure Take 10 or More Meds

When older people hospitalized for heart failure are sent home, they are often given a whopping 10 medications to take for a variety of conditions. But is this "polypharmacy" practice necessary, or does it just place a bigger burden on already frail patients?

It's not a question so much of the quantity of the medications, but whether the medications patients are taking are the right ...

Flu, Pneumonia Vaccines Save Lives of Heart Failure Patients: Study

Flu and pneumonia vaccines lead to fewer hospital deaths among heart failure patients, a new study finds.

"Our study provides further impetus for annual immunizations in patients with heart failure. Despite advice to do so, uptake remains low," said study author Dr. Karthik Gonuguntla, of the University of Connecticut.

In heart failure, your heart can't pump blood as well as...

Stress, Anger May Worsen Heart Failure

If you suffer from heart failure, try to stay calm. Stress and anger may make your condition worse, a new study suggests.

Mental stress is common in heart failure patients due to the complexities of managing the disease, progressively worsening function, and frequent medical issues and hospitalizations, according to lead author Kristie Harris, a postdoctoral associate in cardiovascul...

Marijuana Is Not Heart-Healthy, Experts Say

As marijuana use becomes more common, could heart troubles follow?

Yes, warns a new statement from the American Heart Association (AHA).

A full understanding of how marijuana affects the heart and blood vessels remains limited by a lack of adequate research, but some chemicals in cannabis -- particularly THC, the chemical behind marijuana's "high" -- have been linked to an i...

Cancer Patients Less Likely to Be Prescribed Heart Meds: Study

Heart disease is on the rise among cancer patients and survivors, but they're less likely than people without cancer to be prescribed medicines to protect their heart, a new study finds.

Heart disease has become a leading cause of long-term preventable death in cancer survivors, according to the study published June 16 as a research letter in the journal JACC: CardioOncology.<...

Tai Chi Could Be Good Medicine for Heart Patients

Tai chi might be just what doctors should order for their heart patients, new research suggests.

Many of these folks experience anxiety, stress and depression. For example, depression affects about 20% of people with heart disease or heart failure, 27% of those with high blood pressure, and 35% of stroke survivors.

Tai chi is a mind-body exercise that combines se...

Music Might Help Soothe Ailing Hearts

Music influences people's heart rates, and one piece of music will affect individuals' hearts differently, a new, small study shows.

The findings could lead to novel, drug-free treatments for such conditions as high blood pressure and heart rhythm disorders, or to help people relax or stay alert, the researchers said.

Previous studies that examined physical responses to musi...

Drug Combos May Be Advance Against Heart Failure

Many patients with heart failure might live years longer if they were on a combination of newer medications, a study suggests.

Researchers estimate that if certain heart failure patients were prescribed a four-pill regimen -- including three recently proven therapies -- they could live up to six years longer, compared with the regimen patients commonly use.

The findings, pub...

High Blood Pressure May Affect More Pregnant Women Than Thought: Study

Twice as many women who have high blood pressure during pregnancy may be at an increased risk for heart and kidney disease than once thought, a new study suggests.

For the study, researchers collected data on more than 9,800 pregnancies among more than 7,500 women in Olmsted County, Minn., who gave birth between 1976 and 1982.

During that time, 659 women had 719 high blood...

Heart Attacks, Strokes Are Declining Among People With Diabetes

An Australian study has good news for people with type 2 diabetes -- fewer people with diabetes are having heart attacks and strokes compared to 20 years ago.

Heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular complications have declined in the general population, too. But the decreases among people with diabetes have outpaced those for the general population, the researchers said.

...

Have Heart Failure? Take Precautions During Pandemic

Heart failure raises the risk of complications and death from COVID-19, and requires extra vigilance during the pandemic, the American Heart Association (AHA) says.

More than 6 million people in the United States have heart failure. It occurs when the heart no longer pumps blood as well as it should.

"When the cardiac system is weakened by heart failure and unable to maintai...

Severe COVID-19 Might Injure the Heart

The new coronavirus may be a respiratory bug, but it's becoming clear that some severely ill patients sustain heart damage. And it may substantially raise their risk of death, doctors in China are reporting.

They found that among 416 patients hospitalized for severe COVID-19 infections, almost 20% developed damage to the heart muscle. More than half of those patients died.

...

Weight-Loss Surgery May Cut Risk of Heart Attack, Stroke

Weight-loss surgery is associated with a significantly lower risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure and death, a new study reveals.

The study included more than 7,400 severely obese people, average age 36, in Denmark who had not suffered a heart attack or stroke. Half of the participants had weight-loss ("bariatric") surgery and half did not (the "control" group).

Over ...

U.S. Deaths From High Blood Pressure Soar, Especially in the South: Study

There's been a sharp increase in high blood pressure-related deaths in the United States, particularly in rural areas, a new study says.

Researchers analyzed data on more than 10 million U.S. deaths between 2007 and 2017 and found that death rates linked to high blood pressure (hypertension) rose 72% in rural areas and 20% in urban areas.

The increase was highest in ...

Statins Might Reduce Harms From Breast Cancer Chemo

Cholesterol-lowering statins are commonly used to help prevent heart disease. Now a new study hints that they could shield women's hearts from the harms of certain breast cancer drugs.

The study focused on women in Canada who'd been treated with either chemotherapy drugs called anthracyclines or the medication Herceptin. Though the treatments can be lifesaving, they can also damage th...

Certain Cancers Linked to Higher A-Fib Risk, Study Finds

People with a history of certain cancers have more than double the risk for the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation, a new study says.

A-fib is a common disorder that can lead to palpitations, dizziness and fatigue. Untreated, it can cause blood clots, stroke and heart failure, and people with a-fib have five times the risk of stroke than other people.

"When we looked ...