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Results for search "Behavior".

02 Jun

Volunteering Helps Kids ‘Flourish’ Mentally and Physically, Study Finds

Children and adolescents who volunteer are more likely to be in excellent health and less likely to have behavioral problems, researchers say.

18 Nov

Long Hours in Day Care Won’t Cause Behavioral Problems, Study Finds

Researchers find little evidence that spending extensive time in day care causes behavioral issues from biting to bullying.

Health News Results - 635

Face-to-Face Wins: People Get Bigger Mental Boost From Socializing Than Social Media

For a needed mood boost, skip social media and strike up an in-person conversation with someone instead.

Face-to-face socializing boosts mood more than screen time, a new study finds.

People often expect that will be the case, but they don’t always follow that instinct, according to the researchers.

"These findings suggest that people may use their smartphones because ...

'Night Owls' Are Often Less Healthy, Upping Diabetes Risk

Staying up late comes naturally to some folks, whether they’re working or relaxing deep into the night.

But being a night owl might come at a cost to one’s health.

People who are night owls have a higher risk than early birds of becoming diabetic, a new study has found.

“We found that night owls were at 72% increased risk of developing diabetes when we compare them to ea...

Opposites May Not Attract After All, Study of Millions of Couples Finds

There's an adage that in romantic relationships, opposites attract. Now, a large, new study confirms that just like many old sayings, it's wrong.

In an analysis of about 200 studies involving millions of couples, researchers came to the conclusion that there is little behind the claim that opposites attract. If anything, the one about birds of feather flocking together is much closer to t...

Common Plastics Chemical Could Harm Boys' Development

Phthalates are commonly used in plastics, and researchers have now tied them to developmental issues in toddler boys who were exposed to the chemical in the womb.

The new study links the chemicals to emotional and behavioral development issues in 2-year-old boys ...

Homesickness Is Common for College Freshmen. A Psychologist Offers Tips to Cope

It can be hard for new college students, or those returning after summer break, to be away from home.

Homesickness is a normal reaction. About 30% of all students and 70% of first-year students experience it. Though it can happen at any time, it’s most common in the first few months away.

Better Sleep, Less Stress-Linked 'Acting Out' in Kids

If your child is acting out and you’re looking for solutions, researchers at the University of Georgia’s Youth Development Institute suggest better sleep might be the answer.

Getting more hours of slumber could reduce impulsive behavior in kids, their new study showed.

“Stressful environments are shown to make adolescents seek immediate rewards rather than delayed rewards, but...

No 'Beer Goggles': Drinking Doesn't Make Others Seem More Attractive, Study Finds

Many a person has blamed "beer goggles" following a regrettable one-night stand, but a new study suggests that there's no such thing.

Rather, alcohol acts more like "liquid courage," according to findings published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs -- you become more likely to approach ...

To Keep Depression at Bay, Fighting Negative Thoughts Is Key

Millions of Americans who experience major depression will suffer a relapse, but a new study suggests that learning to focus on the positive, rather than the negatives in everyday life, might help reduce those odds.

“What we started to realize is it’s not just about how people with depression process negative information but there’s something interesting about how they process ...

Poll Shows Who Americans Trust (and Don't Trust) for Health News

Misinformation about health and medicine is rampant in the United States, with far too many Americans being presented false claims and left wondering what to believe, a new survey reports.

At least 4 in 10 people say they’ve heard 10 specific false claims about COVID-19, reproductive health and gun violence,

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 22, 2023
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  • 'Do Your Own Research': Was It Dangerous Advice During the Pandemic?

    The idea of “doing your own research” didn’t begin with the pandemic, but new research suggests that those who follow that ideology have been more likely to believe COVID misinformation.

    “We had heard the phrase a lot before,” prior to the pandemic, said researcher Sedona Chinn, a professor of life science...

    Is Science Getting Closer to the Brain Center for Male Libido?

    A single hardwired brain circuit might be responsible for male sexual drive, a new mouse study reports.

    Researchers have singled out in lab mice a brain region that controls sexual interest, libido, mating behavior and pleasure, said senior researcher Dr. Nirao Shah, a professor of psychiatry and neurobiology at Stanfo...

    More Typos: Workers' Mistakes Rise on Fridays, Study Shows

    Workers may sense it intuitively but their mouse clicks prove it: Friday afternoon is the least productive time of the work week.

    It's also when workers make the most typos.

    A Texas A&M University team studied this using the computer usage metrics of 789 in-office employees at a large energy company over two years.

    “Most studies of worker productivity use employee self-repor...

    One Personality Type Is More Prone to Be an Anti-Vaxxer

    When studying which personality types were more likely to resist getting vaccines, researchers got a surprise.

    It was the extroverts who were more vaccine resistant. Compared to other personality styles, extroverts were 18% more likely to refuse the COVID-19 vaccine, the new study finds.

    “We expected that people who were especially high in extroversion would be more likely to ge...

    Could Exposure to Lead Early in Life Raise Odds for Criminality Later?

    Being exposed to lead while in the womb or during early childhood may increase a person's chance of engaging in criminal behavior as an adult, a new review claims.

    To arrive at this conclusion, the review authors evaluated 17 previous studies that used varying methods to test for lead exposure, including blood, bones and teeth. They also addressed the effects of exposure at different ages...

    Researchers Identify Genes That Influence What You Eat

    You've likely heard that "you are what you eat,” but a new study suggests what you eat also has something to do with who you are — genetically speaking.

    Researchers have identified nearly 500 genes that appear to directly influence what someone eats. These insights could help improve personalized nutrition to boost health or prevent disease, they said.

    “Some genes we iden...

    Bite Your Nails or Pick at Your Skin? A New Study Has a Solution for That

    If you just can't stop biting your nails, picking at your skin or pulling out a hank of hair, especially when you're stressed out, here's something to try that just might work.

    Instead of nibbling, picking or pulling, simply touch your skin gently, such as by lightly rubbing the fingertips, palm or back of arm, at least twice a day.

    That strategy, called "habit replacement," helped ...

    Home Delivery of Alcohol Expanded During Pandemic, With Permanent Effects on Health

    During the COVID-19 pandemic home liquor delivery soared in the United States, as did binge drinking along with it, a new study finds.

    "'Home delivery' refers to when restaurants, bars or retailers use their own employees or a third-party delivery system such as DoorDash or Uber Eats to deliver alcohol to consumers' homes," said researcher

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 28, 2023
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  • Binge Drinking in Middle Age: Has 'Wine Mom' Culture Gone Too Far?

    It's an image you see everywhere on social media and television: Groups of 30-something women, glistening glasses of chardonnay or cabernet in their hands as they let loose with their friends.

    But a new study digs into the downside of "booze bonding" — these women are 60% more likely to engage in excessive drinking than their peers were some 25 years earlier.

    The investigators al...

    Global Study Shows Loneliness Can Shorten Life Spans

    There is an epidemic of loneliness and isolation today, and the consequences can be deadly, researchers say.

    Folks who reported that they were socially isolated or felt lonely were more likely to die early from all causes including cancer, according to a sweeping review of 90 studies that included more than 2.2 million people from around the globe.

    Exactly how loneliness or social i...

    Two-Thirds of Doctors, Researchers Say They've Faced Harassment Since Start of Pandemic

    Physicians and scientists are experiencing alarming levels of harassment on social media, according to a new survey.

    About two-thirds of respondents said they had been harassed on social media since the COVID-19 pandemic began -- up from 23.3% of physicians surveyed in 2020.

    About 64% reported harassment related to comments made about the pandemic, while 64% of those harassed said t...

    Temptation Alley: Checkout Counters Are Prime Spots for Unhealthy Food

    Every grocery shopper must pass through the “temptation alley” that is the checkout aisle, surrounded by candy bars, salty snacks and sugary sodas.

    Those who'd like a healthy option for an impulse buy while they wait in line -- fruit, veggies, nuts or water -- will be left wanting, a new study says.

    About 70% of foods and beverages offered at checkout stands are unhealthy, accor...

    Sleep, Cleaning, Fun: Research Reveals the Average Human's Day Worldwide

    How do you spend each day?

    Researchers sought answers to that basic question from people of various ages living around the world. They report that on an average day, people spend more than a third of their time focused on matters of health, happiness and keeping up appearances.

    “We found that the single largest chunk of time is really focused on humans ourselves, a little more th...

    What Is 'Authoritarian Parenting'?

    Understanding different parenting styles can help you pick the right one as you navigate the challenges of child-rearing.

    Here, experts explain what an authoritarian parenting style is, examples of authoritarian parenting techniques, and what authoritarian discipline looks like. You'll also discover how this style compares to authoritative parenting.

    What is authoritarian pa...

    Going Solo: Masturbation May Give Humans an Evolutionary Edge

    Some might think masturbation is all about self-pleasure, but scientists now claim it's far more significant than that.

    Their new findings suggest it could serve an important role in evolution.

    An ancient trait in primates, masturbation — at least for the males of the species — increases their reproductive success while also helping them avoid catching sexually transmitted infe...

    Helping Others as Volunteers Helps Kids 'Flourish': Study

    Kids who devote some of their free time to volunteer work may not only help others, but also themselves.

    That's according to a new study that found U.S. kids who spend time in community service are often thriving, physically and mentally.

    Overall, kids who'd volunteered in the past year were in better physical health, had a more positive outlook on life, and were less likely to have...

    Who's More Easily Distracted, the Young or the Old?

    Older adults are more easily distracted than younger folks, especially if they're also physically exerting themselves, according to new research.

    “Our results suggest that older adults might have heightened distractibility,” said study co-author Lilian Azer, a graduate student from the University of Califo...

    Teen Dating Violence Sets Stage for Future Abusive Relationships

    Teens who are abused by a romantic partner may suffer long-lasting repercussions, and this is especially true for girls, a new analysis finds.

    Investigators who reviewed 38 studies concluded that teenage dating violence was linked to a higher risk for additional relationship violence in the teen years and even into adulthood.

    These unhealthy relationships were also associated...

    Which Kids Face the Highest Risk of Self-Harm?

    Growing numbers of American kids and teens are cutting or burning themselves, banging their heads against walls, pulling out their hair and even trying to die by suicide.

    But figuring out who is at highest risk for harming themselves has been a daunting challenge. Until now.

    Researchers report they have developed risk profiles that can help doctors pinpoint which kids or teens are ...

    Why People Love Selfies: It's Not About Vanity

    Selfie shots might seem shallow but they're actually serving a deeper psychological purpose, a new study suggests.

    So-called "third-person" photos -- shots taken to include the photographer, such as selfies or group shots -- are better at depicting the deeper meaning of an event in a person's life, by showing them actively participating in that moment, according to researchers.

    On t...

    How Junk Food Ads Play on Your Emotions

    Those TV ads for juicy burgers may trigger your emotions, making you believe you'll be happier if you run out and get one for yourself.

    Unfortunately, a similar ad for salad does not appear to have the same emotional impact, according to new research from the University of Michigan.

    "Many people think that eating highly processed foods like cheeseburgers and french fries will make t...

    Does Cracking Your Knuckles Cause Arthritis?

    Have you heard the old wives' tale that knuckle cracking will enlarge your knuckles? What about the one that cracking your knuckles causes arthritis?

    There are many beliefs about this common behavior, but it's time to debunk the myths about knuckle cracking.

    Why do people crack their knuckles?

  • Mandi Harenberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 20, 2023
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  • Secret Weapon for Quit-Smoking Campaigns: Pets

    Put out that cigarette for the health of your four-legged friend.

    When smokers search social media for anti-tobacco information, they tend to engage most with posts about the risk of secondhand smoke on their pets, a new study reveals.

    Posts with new information about harmful chemicals also receive high engagement, researchers found.

    “Our results show that people respond to ...

    Gambling: When Does Play Become Addiction?

    While some gamble socially and others do it for a living, it's a serious addiction for those who have an uncontrollable urge to keep going at the risk of losing everything.

    “In our brain, the centers involved with gambling addiction are the same centers involved with substance addiction," said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 25, 2023
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  • Did the Pandemic Spur Permanent Decline in Americans' Daily Steps?

    If you feel like the pandemic made you a permanent couch potato, a new study shows you're not alone: Well after lockdown measures were relaxed, many Americans were still taking fewer steps each day.

    Researchers found that, on the whole, Americans' daily step count plummeted at the beginning of the pandemic in 2020 -- an understandable decline that prior studies have charted.

    However...

    Is Oxytocin Really the 'Love Hormone'? Rodent Research Raises Doubt

    The "love hormone" oxytocin might not play the critical role in forming social bonds that scientists have long believed, a new animal study suggests.

    Prairie voles bred without receptors for oxytocin display the same monogamous mating, attachment and parenting behaviors as regular voles, according to researchers.

    "While oxytocin has been considered 'Love Potion No. 9,' it seems that...

    What Exercise 'Snack' Is Best for Your Health?

    Millions of adults spend too much time at a desk or in front of a screen, and experts have long advised them to sit less, move more.

    But if lower blood pressure, lower blood sugar and a mood boost are the goals, what's the bare minimum of movement that will get the job done?

    Apparently just five minutes of walking every 30 minutes.

    That's the finding of a small, new study that...

    Procrastinators May Delay All the Way to Worse Health

    College students who routinely cram at the last minute may not only see their grades suffer, but their health, too, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that of more than 3,500 college students they followed, those who scored high on a procrastination scale were more likely to report certain health issues nine months later. The list included body aches, poor sleep, and depression and a...

    One Gender May Excel at Reading What Others Are Feeling

    A new study confirms what many believe: Women tend to be better than men at imagining or understanding what another person is feeling or thinking.

    Using a test that measures empathy, researchers evaluated more than 300,000 people in 57 countries around the world to come to that conclusion.

    “Our results provide some of the first evidence that the well-known phenomenon — that fem...

    Anger Management Treatment Via the Internet Shows Promise

    Swedish researchers studying anger say it appears there is a pent-up need for anger management and that an internet-based treatment can work.

    Scientists from the Centre for Psychiatry Research at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, had to close its recruitment site after a few weeks because there was so much demand for help with anger issues.

    "It is usually very difficul...

    Stranded Dolphins' Brains Show Alzheimer's-Like Changes

    Groups of whales, dolphins and porpoises are regularly stranded in shallow waters around the coasts of the United Kingdom.

    Researchers wanted to understand why, so they studied the brains of 22 toothed whales — or "odontocetes" — that were stranded in Scottish coastal waters.

    The study includ...

    Youngest Kids in Class More Likely to Get Prescribed ADHD Meds

    Kids who are the youngest in their grade may be overmedicated for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a Norwegian researcher who studied prescribing data.

    Those who were also born preterm were at particular risk of being overmedicated, said Dr. Christine Strand...

    Your Dog's Behavior Is in Its DNA

    Is your pooch a herder or a hunter? You can try taking them to a trainer, but new research shows much of their behavior is hardwired in their DNA.

    For the new study, researchers analyzed DNA samples from more than 200 dog breeds and surveyed 46,000 pet-owners to try to suss out why certain breeds act the way they do.

    “The largest, most successful genetic experiment that humans hav...

    Number of Americans Carrying Loaded Handguns Keeps Rising

    Americans are more likely to carry a loaded handgun than ever before: New research finds about twice as many adults carried in 2019 as did in 2015.

    “Between increases in the number of people who own handguns and the number of people who carry every day, there has been a striking increase in handgun carrying in the U.S.,” said lead study author

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 21, 2022
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  • Clocks 'Fall Back' on Sunday: Sleep Expert Offers Tips to Adjust

    It's time for time to fall back an hour, but fortunately that change is more in line with humans' circadian rhythm than springing forward.

    This provides an opportunity for people to “fix” their circadian rhythm, that 24-hour body clock that regulates hormone release and temperature, said an expert from Baylor College of Medicine who offered some tips.

    “While the end of dayli...

    Your Cat Wants a Talk With You, and Only You

    For cat owners who are convinced that their furry feline understands and even responds to the sound of their voice, here's the reward they've been waiting for: A new French study finds that, yes, cats can identify their owner's cooing and calling.

    After extensive work with 16 cats, the investigators...

    Sleep-Deprived Kids Will Snack More: Study

    Experts studying kids' sleep and eating habits have learned more about a potential reason for childhood obesity.

    Kids who are deprived of sleep tend to eat more calories the next day, researchers found. And some of those extra calories come from less-healthy, sugar-laden snacks or treats.

    "When children lost sleep, overall they ate an extra 74 calories per day, caused by an increase...

    Kept Home Under Lockdown, U.S. Couples May Have Spurred a 'Baby Bump'

    The pandemic brought about a lot of changes in people's lives. For many, that included a new baby.

    The United States saw a “baby bump” in 2021 described in a new study as “the first major reversal in declining U.S. fertility rates since 2007.”

    It was the opposite of what early forecasts predicted.

    “Ther...

    Lots of Americans Lied to Others About COVID: Study

    At the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, more than 40% of Americans were untruthful about whether they had the virus or were ignoring safety precautions, a nationwide survey shows.

    The December

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 10, 2022
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  • Speeding, Texting a Dangerous Duo for Many Teen Drivers: Study

    Danger on the road: Speeding and texting while driving are two common but risky behaviors among teens, a new study finds.

    Among teen drivers in the study, researchers found they drove over the speed limit on 40% of trips and held cellphones more than 30% of th...

    Not All Kids With Autism Will Benefit From Therapy Dogs

    For many kids with autism, Rhett, a black Labrador retriever, has been a calming and comforting influence in his seven years as a therapy dog.

    But parents shouldn't assume that a service pooch is the solution for every child on the autism spectrum, a new study...

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