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Health News Results - 202

Eye Strain at Work? Try the 20-20-20 Rule for Relief

Staring at a computer screen endlessly can lead to dry, irritated, tired eyes and headaches.

But there’s a quick fix.

Just look away from the screen every 20 minutes. Do this for at least 20 seconds, and look about 20 feet in the distance.

Experts have suggested the 20-20-20 rule for a long time. ...

Study Points to Jobs With Highest Risk for ALS

People who work in manufacturing, welding and chemical operations and are exposed to hazardous chemicals may face a higher risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a new study found.

"This study shows that certain occupational settings and exposures increase one’s chances ...

Paid Sick Leave Saves Workers' Lives: Study

Access to paid sick leave saves lives, new research shows.

The U.S. study found that when local laws required employers to provide paid sick leave, lower death rates from homicide, suicide and alcohol-related causes resulted.

The researchers also believe that recent upticks in death rates -- up 6% between 2010 and 2017 -- among U.S. workers likely stem from state preemption laws, wh...

Up to 4 Million Americans Out of Work With Long COVID

In yet another example of the financial toll that the new coronavirus has exacted during the pandemic, a new report estimates that up to 4 million Americans are out of work as they struggle with long COVID.

"This is a shocking number," report auth...

Unpaid Time Off Work Rose 50% During Pandemic

U.S. workers without paid leave lost out on an estimated $28 billion in wages during the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new report.

The analysis showed that the greatest increases in unpaid absences were among low-income workers who were self-employed,...

8/8 -- Self-Employed Women Are Often Healthier: Study

Women who are their own bosses might have healthier hearts to show for it, a new study suggests.

The study, of more than 4,600 working U.S. women, found that those who were self-employed typically got more exercise and were less likely to be obese or have

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 2, 2022
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  • Rising Number of Americans Think It's OK to Harass Public Health Officials

    U.S. health officials are in the crosshairs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, facing threats and harassment from the public they serve.

    And a growing percentage of U.S. adults are fine with that, according to a new Cornell University study.

    Analysis of public opinion ...

    Work Worries Keep Lots of Americans Awake Sunday Nights

    Don't be afraid of Sunday night.

    Good sleep habits can ward off the so-called “Sunday scaries” — the worry about returning to work on Monday morning that keeps many folks tossing and turning on Sunday night.

    A recent American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM)

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 1, 2022
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  • Overworked Anesthesiologists Can Put Surgical Patients at Risk

    Harried, overworked anesthesiologists could be raising hospital patients' risk of death and complications, a new study reports.

    It's not uncommon to have one anesthesiologist directing the anesthesia care for multiple surgeries at the same time, overseeing the work of lower-ranking anesthesia clinicians assi...

    Minority Students More Likely to Leave Medical School: Study

    Medical schools are doing a better job of recruiting minority students, but they still struggle to keep those would-be doctors on...

    Are Workplace Robots Bringing Mental Harm to U.S. Workers?

    It takes much less than a "Matrix" plot to make American workers afraid for their jobs: New research reveals they stress out when they have to work alongside robots.

    Even though many robots took on the most dangero...

    Veterans at Higher Risk of Deadly Skin Cancers

    U.S. veterans are at higher risk for melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, than most Americans, and new research finds they are also more likely to have advanced-stage disease when it's detected.

    At the time of diagnosis, "we found veterans with melanoma were more like...

    Workers in U.S. Southwest in Peril as Summer Temperatures Rise

    It's getting hotter and hotter outside due to global warming and, as a result, outdoor workers in southwestern states are increasingly vulnerable to heat-related illnesses.

    Making matters worse, many of these workers may not realize their health is in jeopardy.

    This is the main finding of a new study that looked at how extreme heat affects outdoor workers' health in Las Vegas, Los A...

    1 in 4 Hospital Physicians 'Mistreated' by Patients, Visitors

    Nearly 1 in 4 hospital doctors are mistreated at work by patients, visitors and other doctors, and female doctors are nearly two times more likely than male doctors to face this abuse, a new study reveals.

    "All members of the health care team share the r...

    Pandemic's Early Days Hit Nurses Hard: Report

    Frontline nurses were plagued by "moral distress" in the early days of the pandemic because they lacked the support to provide high-quality care, a new report reveals.

    Between May and September 2020, researchers interviewed 100 nurses across the United States who cared for COVID-19 patients.

    The nurses reported moral distress caused by knowing how to treat patients and protect thems...

    Do Zoom Meetings Kill Creativity?

    Zoom meetings became the lifeblood of many workplaces during pandemic, but a new study points to a downside: They may limit employees' capacity for creative thinking.

    In experiments with workers in several countries, researchers found two broad phenomenon: Coworkers te...

    Women Less Likely Than Men to Return to Work After Severe Stroke

    Women are less likely than men to head back to their jobs after recovering from a severe stroke, but researchers say the reasons for that difference are unclear.

    "Returning to work after a severe stroke is a sign of successful

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 26, 2022
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  • Health Care Workers Were At Highest COVID Risk in Workplace

    U.S. health care workers were most likely to be infected with COVID-19 at work during the pandemic's first year, according to a new study that challenges previous research suggesting their risk was highest off the job.

    Researchers said their findings could help guide efforts to better protect ...

    Pandemic Is Leaving U.S. With Shortage of Long-Term Health Care Workers

    The pandemic has worsened longstanding staffing shortages at U.S. nursing homes and other long-term care facilities. Now, a new study shows that high employee turnover rates have yet to improve.

    Researchers found that after initial workforce losses in the early phase of the pandemic, U.S. ...

    Hospital Work During Pandemic Was Like a War Zone: Study

    Health care workers battling the pandemic may be suffering moral traumas at a rate similar to soldiers in a war zone, a new study suggests.

    The pandemic has brought a stream of stories about overtaxed health care workers, facing repeated COVID surges, resource shortages and public resistance to the vaccines that can keep people out of the hospital. Workers' distress is often called burnou...

    Mom's Use of Workplace Disinfectants in Pregnancy Tied to Eczema, Asthma in Kids

    If you're a worker who plans to get pregnant, take heed of a new study that warns that pregnant women who work in hospitals and are exposed to disinfectants may be more likely to have children who suffer from asthma and

  • Cara Murez
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  • March 29, 2022
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  • Shift Work Might Delay Menopause, With Potential Harms to Health

    Women whose jobs require shift work may experience delayed menopause, according to a new study, and it could be bad for their health.

    Whether it's working the overnight shift or different hours from day to day, shift work has been linked to higher risks for a variety of health problems, in...

    Firefighters Face Higher Odds for Heart Trouble

    The more blazes firefighters battle, the higher their risk for a heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation (a-fib), a new study shows.

    "Clinicians who care for firefighters need to be aware of the increased cardiovascular risk, especially the increased ris...

    Construction Workers May Bring Toxic Metals Back Home

    Construction workers may bring home more than the bacon -- they may also be exposing their families to toxic metals, a new study reveals.

    Toxic contaminants unintentionally brought from the workplace into the home are a public health hazard, but the majority of research to date has focused on

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  • February 22, 2022
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  • Most Vaccine-Hesitant Health Care Workers Change Their Minds, Study Shows

    Most health care workers at a large U.S. hospital who initially refused COVID-19 vaccines eventually went and got their shots, new research reveals.

    "

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 4, 2022
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  • As Winter Olympics Nears, America's Athletes May Be More Stressed Than Ever

    With America's best skiers, skaters and snowboarders now heading to the Winter Olympics, a team of mental health professionals will be in Beijing to help them perform under the double strain of intense competition and a pandemic.

    One of those professionals is Dr. David Baron, provost of Western University of Health Sciences in Pomona, Calif. He'll enter the Olympic Village in Beijing as t...

    Pesticides at Work Could Raise Odds for COPD Lung Disease

    Workplace exposure to pesticides may boost a person's risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a new study finds.

    COPD is a group of lung diseases that cause airflow blockage and breathing problems. Emphysema and chronic bronchitis are the two main types of

    Omicron Batters Already Strained U.S. Hospitals

    U.S. hospitals continue to reel from the pressure posed by the ongoing pandemic, facing critical workforce shortages and rising labor costs that amount to a "national emergency," hospital executives say.

    Nearly 1,400 hospitals -- 31% of the nation's total -- are on the verge of critical staffing shortages, according to the American Hospital Association (AHA). In 12 states, 40% or more of ...

    Many People With Asthma Have Mixed Feelings About Masks: Poll

    Although they report difficulty breathing and discomfort while wearing a face mask, most people with asthma still use them in public places during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study finds.

    University of Illinois Chicago researchers conducted an online survey of more than 500 adults with asthma. They found that 84% report...

    Formaldehyde in the Workplace Tied to Later Brain Issues

    Long-term workplace exposure to formaldehyde may prompt thinking and memory problems later in life, new research suggests.

    Formaldehyde is a gas used in making wood and chemical products and plastics.

    "We know that exposure to formaldehyde has been linked to certain cancers, and our results sugge...

    School COVID Outbreaks Drop When Adults Wear Masks, Study Finds

    Of course kids make up the bulk of people at schools, but new evidence shows that requiring masks for adults working at schools greatly reduces the severity of COVID-19 outbreaks.

    In the study, the researchers found that children were most often the first identified cases in schools. However, outbreaks in schools were more severe when an adult was the first case, and mask wearing by adult...

    Most Vaccinated Adults Plan to Get Boosters: Poll

    Most vaccinated American adults have every intention of getting booster shots, a new poll finds.

    Only about one in five say they won't get it, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) survey conducted with 1,820 U.S. adults between Nov. 8 and Nov. 22. About 23% of vaccinated adults have already received a booster shot in the United States, up sharply from October when it was 10%.

    Pandemic Stress, Exhaustion Weigh on Health Care Workers

    The pandemic is taking a toll on health care workers' sleep, which can put both their mental health and patient care at risk, researchers warn.

    Their study of more than 800 New York City health care workers found that compared to those with no sleep problems, those with poor sleep were two times more likely to report symptoms of depression, 70% more likely to report anxiety, and 50% more...

    Nearly 1 in 3 U.S. Hospital Personnel Still Unvaccinated

    Nearly a third of health care staff in U.S. hospitals were not vaccinated against COVID-19 as of mid-September, a new study shows.

    Researchers analyzed data on more than 3.3 million health care workers at more than 2,000 hospitals nationwide between Jan. 20 and Sept. 15.

    "Our analysis revealed that vaccine coverage among U.S. hospital-based [health care personnel] stalled significan...

    Better Work Conditions Bringing Better Mental Health to Resident Doctors: Study

    Medical training may be taking less of a mental health toll on young doctors than it used to, but depression remains common, a new study suggests.

    Medical residency -- the training that new doctors undergo at hospitals or clinics -- is infamous for its grueling schedule, high pressure and relatively low pay. Research has shown that residents also have fairly high depression rates.

    N...

    Sexism May Play Role in Who Performs Your Surgery

    Male doctors are much more likely to refer patients to male surgeons, rather than send them to female surgeons with equal qualifications and experience, a new study finds.

    "During my 20 years in practice, I always had the sense it was easier for my male surgical colleagues to get referrals than it was for me, and the patients they were referred were more likely to need surgery," said seni...

    Firefighters' Blood Pressure Can Rise When Duty Calls

    Working in an already dangerous environment, the blood pressure of firefighters jumps when they get an emergency call, new research shows.

    That could be risky for those who already have high blood pressure, experts say.

    "All emergency and first responders should be aware of their health," said senior author Deborah Feairheller, director of the clinical cardiac program at the Univer...

    White House Sets Jan. 4 Deadline for Large, Private U.S. Companies to Mandate Vaccines

    Large U.S. companies have until Jan. 4, 2022 to ensure their employees are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, the Biden administration said Thursday.

    Unvaccinated workers must undergo weekly testing under the plan that applies to businesses with 100 or more employees and will cover 84 million private sector workers, the New York Times reported.

    President Joe Biden first announced th...

    Women Less Likely to Ask for More Time When Deadlines Loom

    It's a case of being your own worst enemy: New research shows that women are more reluctant to ask for deadline extensions at work than their male colleagues are, in part because they worry about being seen as incompetent.

    In a series of studies, researchers found that overall, women were less likely than men to ask for extra time to complete a work or school task. And that reluctance see...

    Pandemic Has Stressed Out Doctors

    It's a finding that stands to reason: A new study shows the pandemic has triggered anxiety and depression in many doctors.

    Researchers used surveys to assess the mental health of more than 5,000 doctors in Spain, Italy and the United Kingdom at two points during the pandemic -- June 2020 and November/December 2020.

    Doctors in Italy had the highest rates of anxiety (1 in 4) and of de...

    When Climbing Corporate Ladder, Women Are as Competitive as Men: Study

    Women are as competitive and as willing to take risks as men when it comes to advancing in the workplace, according to a new study on the gender pay gap in the United States.

    "If we're finally going to close the gender pay gap, then we have to understand the sources of it -- and also solutions and remedies for it," said study co-author Mary Rigdon, associate director of the Center for the...

    Guard Dogs, Panic Buttons: Nurses Under Threat From Rising Violence

    Emergency room nurse Grace Politis was catching up on paperwork during her shift when she suddenly realized her head hurt badly. Then she blacked out.

    "Later on, I found out I was hit in the head twice with a fire extinguisher by a patient," said Politis, who works at Lowell General Hospital in Lowell, Mass.

    A disturbed man awaiting psychiatric evaluation had fractured Politis' skul...

    Nearly 59,000 Meatpacking Workers Caught COVID, While 269 Died: Report

    The number of U.S. meatpacking workers who were infected during the COVID-19 pandemic is nearly three times higher than previously thought, a U.S. House report shows.

    It said at least 59,000 workers caught the disease and 269 died as the pandemic raged through the industry last year, and added that companies could have done more to protect their employees, the Associated Press re...

    Nurses Have Suicidal Thoughts More Often Than Other Workers: Study

    U.S. nurses think about suicide more often than other workers do, but are less likely to tell anyone about it, new research reveals.

    For the study, the researchers analyzed the responses of more than 7,000 nurses and nearly 5,200 other general workforce members who took part in a national poll on well-being that was conducted in November 2017 and included questions on issues ranging from ...

    Why Are Gulf Coast Welders Dying From Anthrax-Like Disease?

    A common group of bacteria may be causing deadly pneumonia or anthrax-like disease among metalworkers in the southern United States, health officials report.

    The bacteria, called Bacillus cereus (B. cereus), naturally occurs in soil and dust. B. cereus can cause food poisoning and anthrax-like disease, but why it singles out welders and other metalworke...

    Long Bouts of Space Travel May Harm Astronauts' Brains

    Prolonged stays in space appear to damage astronauts' brains, a small, new study suggests.

    The researchers studied five Russian cosmonauts, mean age 49, who stayed on the International Space Station (ISS) for an average of 5.5 months.

    Blood samples were taken from the cosmonauts 20 days before their departure to the ISS, and one day, one week, and about three weeks after they return...

    Many Americans May Quit, Change Jobs Due to Pandemic Stress: Survey

    The pressures of the pandemic have dramatically altered the American workplace, and now a new survey shows that many folks who have struggled with low salaries, long hours and lack of opportunity plan to change jobs.

    More than 40% of workers said they plan to make the switch in the coming year, the poll found. If that occurs, it could seriously affect many industries already facing shorta...

    U.S. Appeals Panel Backs New York City's Vaccine Mandate for School Staff

    All of New York City's teachers and school staff will still need to get a coronavirus vaccine following an unexpected ruling from a federal appeals panel on Monday that upheld the school system's vaccine mandate.

    While Mayor Bill de Blasio recently ordered the city's school staff to get at least one vaccine dose by midnight Monday, that order was paused late last week by a judge of the U....

    CDC Endorses Booster Shots for Millions of Americans

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday recommended booster shots of Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine for millions of older and high-risk Americans, kicking off a new chapter in the national effort to protect the vulnerable from severe disease.

    First, an expert CDC advisory panel called for COVID-19 booster shots for those over 65, nursing home residents and other Amer...

    Why Logging May Be the Most Dangerous Profession

    Logging and landscaping are the most dangerous jobs in America, a new study finds.

    The risk of death for loggers is more than 30 times higher than for all U.S. workers. Tree care workers also encounter hazards at rates far higher than a typical worker.

    "This was the first research to look at commercial logging and landscaping services together," said Judd Michael, a professor of agr...