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Results for search "Social Networks".

17 Aug

Social Media ‘Likes,’ ‘Shares’ and ‘Retweets’ Help Drive Online Outrage, Study Finds.

Researchers say tech companies, through the design of their social media platforms, have the ability to amplify moral outrage and influence the success or failure of collective movements.

Health News Results - 76

Death Threats, Trolling Common for Scientists Who Speak to Media About COVID

Doctors who discuss COVID-19 in the media frequently face abuse and harassment, including threats of death or violence, a new report reveals.

More than two-thirds of experts surveyed have experienced trolling or personal attacks after speaking about COVID-19 in media interviews, a worldwide survey of more than 300 scientists found.

Further, a quarter said such harassment is a freque...

Facebook Became Emergency Network During Early Days of Pandemic

In a health emergency, social media giants like Facebook can be both quagmires of misinformation and sources of social support and reliable guidance, a small, new study suggests.

Researchers surveyed 32 Facebook users weekly for eight weeks. All were asked about their online experiences during March and April 2020, when COVID-triggered lockdowns unfolded.

The Facebook users -- ...

After an ICU Stay, Social Support Crucial for Seniors' Survival

Older adults who are socially isolated are more likely to experience serious disability or die after a stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), new research reveals.

"This important research finding sheds light on a crucial health care issue that has become more dire during the COVID-19 pandemic," said Dr. E. Albert Reece, dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, in Baltimore....

College Freshmen Drank Less as Pandemic Began

Here's an unexpected silver lining to the pandemic: New research shows there was a decline in overall drinking and binge drinking among U.S. college freshmen during the early months of the new coronavirus' spread across America.

"We found that social factors, like social distancing and reductions in social support from friends, were associated with decreases in alcohol use among first-yea...

Bogus Info on Cancer Common Online, and It Can Harm

Don't believe everything you read on social media about cancer and cancer treatment.

A new study finds that one-third of the most popular articles on social media about treatment for common cancers contains misinformation -- and most of it can be downright dangerous.

"The worst-case scenario is when it leads to a person declining proven cancer treatments in favor of a treatment tha...

Healthy Living Can Lower Your Odds for Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's disease has no cure, but one expert says it may be possible to reduce the risks of developing the disease with healthy lifestyle changes.

There are two different types of Alzheimer's. Early-onset typically affects patients before age 65. Late-onset affects older adults.

"Early-onset dementia often is linked to genetics and can run in families," said Dr. Chen Zhao, a neur...

Not Ready for Post-Pandemic Mingling? Expert Offers Tips to Ease Anxiety

While some people may be ready and eager to reconnect with family and friends at social gatherings post-pandemic, it's OK to feel apprehensive.

As restrictions loosen because infection rates are plummeting and more people are getting vaccinated, many people are experiencing feelings that they didn't expect -- such as anxiety about returning to social situations, according to a psych servi...

Your Teen's Smartphone Could Be Key to Unhealthy Weight

Your teens' route to a healthy or unhealthy weight may be in their hands -- literally.

New research out of South Korea shows that teens who spend too much time on their smartphones are also more prone to eating habits that increase their odds for obesity.

One nutritionist who helps treat obesity in the young wasn't surprised by the findings.

"Spending hours on end on your phon...

Bots Blamed for COVID Misinformation on Facebook

Bots, not individual users, drive much of the COVID-19 misinformation on Facebook, according to a new study.

Bots are large numbers of automated accounts controlled by single users.

"The coronavirus pandemic has sparked what the World Health Organization has called an 'infodemic' of misinformation," said study leader John Ayers, a scientist who specializes in public health surveilla...

Debunking Social Media Myth, Study Finds COVID Vaccine Won't Harm Placenta

Contrary to misleading reports spread on social media, a new study finds the COVID-19 vaccine does no damage to the placenta in pregnancy.

In a study of placentas from patients who were vaccinated for COVID-19 during pregnancy, researchers found no evidence of any harm.

"The placenta is like the black box in an airplane. If something goes wrong with a pregnancy, we usually see chan...

Alcohol Is No Friend to Social Distancing

Maintaining adequate social distance from strangers -- a key COVID-19 preventive measure -- can be tough when you're drinking alcohol, researchers say.

In a new study, the researchers put more than 200 young social drinkers in different social situations in laboratory settings. They drank either alcoholic or nonalcoholic beverages.

In half of the cases, participants drank with a fri...

Feeling Down? Support Via Social Media May Not Be Enough

Looking for a morale boost or some solid encouragement? If so, socializing the old-fashioned way -- live and in-person -- will likely do more to lift your spirits than online interactions, new research suggests.

It's the key takeaway from a survey of more than 400 college undergraduate students.

"We wanted to see if the social support provided over social media was associated with b...

What's for Lunch? Often, It's What Your Co-Workers Are Having

Everyone has probably heard the expression "you are what you eat," but do you eat what you want, or do you follow the crowd?

New research suggests that what people have at lunch is influenced by the friends or coworkers who they are dining with. And this is true whether they're making healthy choices or unhealthy ones.

"We found that individuals tend to mirror the food choices of ot...

You & Your Friends Are Vaccinated. So Why Is Socializing Again Scary?

Heather Gould, a wedding planner in Sonoma, Calif., always had some social anxiety.

Before the pandemic, she'd feel queasy and think twice about going out. But Gould would power through, talking her way through industry events and client meetings without tipping off her insecurities.

But now, after more than a year of interacting only with her closest friends and family, the challen...

Making E-Cigs Cool: Singers, Models in Music Videos Get Teens Vaping

DJ Khaled, Halsey and other musicians are selling electronic cigarettes to young people through product placement in music videos that receive hundreds of millions of views, a pair of new studies report.

Overall, music videos identified as featuring e-cigarette product placements during a four-month period in 2018 received more than 1.6 billion total views on YouTube, researchers report i...

Boys Who Spend Lots of Time Online More Likely to Cyberbully

Here's yet another reason to keep your teenager from spending countless hours online and on popular social media: New research suggests it increases cyberbullying, particularly among teen boys.

"There are some people who engage in cyberbullying online because of the anonymity and the fact that there's no retaliation," said lead investigator Amanda Giordano. She is an associate professor...

When Facebook, Twitter Flag Posts as 'Unverified,' Readers Listen

Readers pay attention when social media sites label an article as "unverified" or "suspicious," a new study suggests.

But how an article is presented -- including author credentials and writing style -- doesn't affect readers' views about its credibility.

The findings show that big tech companies such as Facebook and Twitter have a responsibility to combat the spread of misleading a...

As Social Media Time Rises, So Does Teen Girls' Suicide Risk

As the amount of time young teenage girls spend glued to Instagram, TikTok and other social media sites goes up, so does their long-term risk for suicide, a new study warns.

The finding stems from a decade spent tracking social media habits and suicide risk among 500 teenage boys and girls, the longest such effort to date, the study authors said.

"We found that girls who started usi...

Crowdsourcing Raises Billions for Families Hit Hard by Medical Bills

You have probably seen the social media posts: Your good friend's co-worker is raising money online to help pay for cancer treatments or another friend needs funds to pay medical bills after a car crash.

Crowdsourced fundraising seems to, at least partly, fill a gap between out-of-pocket health care costs and what people can afford.

A new study looked at what the role of one of the ...

Facebook Posts Big Drivers in Vaccine Resistance, Study Finds

As Americans await their COVID-19 shot, a new study of a different vaccine shows the power of Facebook posts in fueling "anti-vax" resistance to immunization.

The study included more than 10 years of public Facebook posts on the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. It found that nearly 40% of 6,500 HPV vaccine-related posts from 2006 to 2016 amplified a perceived risk. The data suggest the...

1 in 4 Doctors Harassed Online, Study Finds

One in four doctors has been personally attacked or sexually harassed on social media, a new study finds.

Women are more likely to be sexually harassed, while both men and women are attacked based on religion, race or medical recommendations, researchers say.

Doctors received negative reviews, coordinated harassment, threats at work, public exposure of their personal information and...

As Social Media Use Rises, So Does Belief in COVID Misinformation

You can't believe everything you read on social media, but those who rely on it for their news tend to think otherwise.

A new study found that the more a person turned to social media as their main source of news, the more likely that person was to believe misinformation about the COVID-19 pandemic. Levels of worry about the coronavirus amplified people's belief in that misinformation.

Loneliness Continues to Rise for Americans Under Lockdown

Loneliness, particularly among folks under shelter-in-place orders, is a growing issue for Americans during the coronavirus pandemic, new research finds.

More people report they are feeling lonely, depressed and even harboring thoughts of suicide as COVID-19 cases in the United States soar. And those who are chafing under lockdown or other stay-at-home restrictions appear to be at the gre...

Young Republicans Much Less Likely to Wear Masks, Social Distance: Study

Republicans have downplayed the importance of masking and social distancing throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, and a new study shows that message has filtered down to the party's youngest voting members.

Nearly one out of every four young adults from the Los Angeles region who identify as Republicans said they do not regularly follow social distancing guidelines, according to a report publ...

Too Much Social Media Time Could Raise Risk of Depression

Young adults who spend hours a day on social media are at heightened risk of developing depression in the near future, new research suggests.

In recent years, a number of studies have linked heavy social media use to an increased risk of depression.

"But then you have to ask the chicken-and-egg question," said study author Dr. Brian Primack, a professor of public health at the Unive...

Coping With Lockdown Loneliness During the Holidays

Pandemic lockdowns will increase Americans' risk of loneliness and depression this holiday season, an expert warns.

"People are grieving for similar reasons: loss of family members, jobs, relationships, friendships and physical touch. Everyone is suffering," said Dr. Asim Shah. He's professor and executive vice chair of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Baylor College of Medicine in H...

Staying Social Can Boost Healthy 'Gray Matter' in Aging Brains

Older adults who get together with friends, volunteer or go to classes have healthier brains, which could help them ward off dementia, according to a new study.

Researchers who used brain imaging to examine brain areas involved in mental decline found that greater social engagement made a difference in brain health.

Being socially engaged -- even moderately -- with at least one ...

'Anti-Vaxx' Movement Shifts Focus to Civil Liberties

Facebook chatter from the anti-vaccination movement now frames the issue as one of civil liberties, a new study finds.

As a COVID-19 vaccine gets closer to becoming a reality, opposition from so-called anti-vaxxer groups could become a political movement, researchers warn.

For the study, the investigators looked at more than 250,000 posts on 204 Facebook pages opposing vac...

FDA Warns of Danger From 'Benadryl Challenge,'  Asks TikTok to Remove Videos

Parents and other caregivers need to be more aware of the potentially lethal "Benadryl Challenge" circulating on social media, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Thursday.

The new internet dare, broadcast widely on teen-friendly TikTok, urges kids to overdose on the over-the-counter antihistamine Benadryl to achieve a hallucinatory state.

However, attempts to do s...

TikTok 'Benadryl Challenge' Has Killed at Least One Teen

A new internet dare, broadcast widely on teen-friendly TikTok, urges kids to overdose on the over-the-counter antihistamine Benadryl.

But the "Benadryl Challenge" has already killed one teen and sent others to the ER, experts warn.

According to News4 in Oklahoma City, one 15-year-old girl suffered a fatal overdose while reportedly trying the challenge late last month....

Another COVID Hazard: False Information

Be careful that the COVID-19 information you're getting is accurate and not opinion masquerading as the real McCoy, says the American College of Emergency Physicians.

Watch out for bold claims and instant cures touted on social media or by friends. Get health and medical information from experts like the ACEP and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the physicians' gr...

More Social Media Use, More Fake COVID News

People getting their COVID-19 information from social media are more likely to receive misinformation, Canadian researchers report.

But those who trust traditional media are less likely to have misperceptions. And they're more likely to stick to public health recommendations such as social distancing, the research team found.

For the study, researchers looked at millions o...

Many Americans Pause Social Media as National Tensions Rise

The coronavirus pandemic and the Black Lives Matter movement have prompted some Americans to take a break from social media, new research finds.

The national survey by Ohio State Wexner Medical Center of 2,000 people found that 56% changed their social media habits because of tensions brought on by current U.S. events.

While 29% said their social media use increase...

Want Added Years? Try Volunteering

If you're older and you want to prolong your life, try volunteering, new research suggests.

"Humans are social creatures by nature. Perhaps this is why our minds and bodies are rewarded when we give to others," said lead investigator Eric Kim. He is from the department of social and behavioral sciences and the Center for Health and Happiness at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Healt...

Home Alone: Will Pandemic's Changes Harm Kids' Mental Health Long-Term?

The isolation of the coronavirus pandemic might be stunting the social growth of young children, experts say.

Since schools closed across the United States this past spring to stem the spread of COVID-19, kids have been deprived of experiences that are essential to their emotional development -- playing at recess, sharing lunch with classmates and learning together in the classroom.

Young People More Vulnerable to Loneliness Than Thought

Even with social media keeping more people connected than ever before, young people in many nations are more likely to feel lonely, British researchers report.

"Contrary to what people may expect, loneliness is not a predicament unique to older people," said lead researcher Manuela Barreto, from the University of Exeter, in England. "In fact, younger people report greater feelings ...

COVID-19 Facts or Fiction: 1 in 4 YouTube Videos Misleads Viewers

More than one-quarter of popular English-language COVID-19 information videos posted to YouTube are misleading, researchers warn.

There are posts, for example, falsely claiming that drug companies already have a cure for COVID-19, but won't sell it, and that different countries have stronger strains of coronavirus, a new study finds.

YouTube viewers "should be skeptical, us...

All That Social Media Hasn't Hurt Kids' Social Skills, Study Finds

Today's youngsters are as socially skilled as previous generations, despite concerns about their heavy use of technology, like smartphones and social media, new research shows.

The researchers compared teacher and parent evaluations of more than 19,000 U.S. children who started kindergarten in 1998 -- six years before Facebook appeared -- with more than 13,000 who began school in 2010...

As Coronavirus Pandemic Hits U.S., Experts Worry About Rise in Suicides

With millions of Americans restricted to their homes and many losing their jobs due to the coronavirus pandemic, a spike in suicides may follow, experts fear.

At a time when suicide in America has been increasing, many of the effects of social distancing are known suicide risk factors, Mark Reger, chief of psychology services at VA Puget Sound Health Care System in Seattle, said in a ...

Why Teens Find It Tough to Social Distance

Parenting a teenager can be an emotional minefield in the best of times, but the social distancing of the coronavirus pandemic could really strain young people's mental health.

Teens and young adults who are confined to home during the coronavirus pandemic face numerous disappointments, including not being able to hang out with friends, missing out on new life experiences and trying t...

Staying at Home During the Pandemic? Use Technology to Stay Connected

Technology can help you maintain social connections if you're staying home during the coronavirus pandemic, an expert says.

"When using technology to stay connected, prioritize keeping deeper, meaningful connections with people," said Stephen Benning, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Benning suggests using Skype or other video mess...

As Health Worsens, Facebook Posts Often Change

Could clues to future health emergencies be found in Facebook posts?

Maybe so, according to a new study that discovered there are changes in users' posts before they seek emergency care.

For the study, researchers analyzed the Facebook posts and medical records of more than 2,900 patients at a U.S. urban hospital, including 419 who'd had a recent emergency department visit f...

Friends Matter for LGBT Health

Having a large social network of other people with the same sexual identity benefits the health of LGBT people, a new study finds.

Previous studies have found that discrimination and related stress can be harmful to the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people, so researchers decided to look at social factors that may reduce that harm.

The investigators...

Social Media Stokes Myths About Vaccines

Nearly 1 in 5 American adults has mistaken beliefs about vaccines, and misinformation is more common among those who rely on social media than on traditional media, a new study finds.

Researchers surveyed nearly 2,500 adults nationwide in the spring and fall of 2019, when the United States was dealing with its largest measles outbreak in decades, and found that up to 20% of respon...

Strong Support Network Is Key to Women's Cancer Recovery: Study

Older women with colon or rectal cancer are more likely to die early if they lack support from family, friends or others, a new study finds.

For the study, researchers looked at more than 1,400 postmenopausal women with colon or rectal cancer who were enrolled in the long-term U.S. Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study.

Compared to those with strong social support, those wit...

Can Online Reviews Help Health Inspectors Keep Tabs on Restaurants?

Could that nasty online review you wrote about your neighborhood restaurant help the local health inspector do a better job?

Yes, according to researchers who found that such reviews may help monitor a restaurant's cleanliness between health inspections.

Because local health departments have to deal with so many restaurants -- for example, there are 20,000 restaurants in Ne...

AHA News: Can Social Media Be Good for Your Health?

Combine the vast power and reach of social media, the unlimited resources of websites and apps, and the unquenchable thirst for health information and motivation. The result is a powerful tool for researchers, health care providers and patients. But like many aspects of the internet, it can be a mixed blessing.

"Social media are an incredible product to provide support and promote go...

Vaping Is the Darling of Instagram

Vaping has been deemed hazardous for your health by public officials across America, but you wouldn't know it by scrolling through Instagram.

Instead, researchers discovered that Instagram posts that promote use of the devices outnumber anti-vaping content by a shocking ratio of 10,000 to 1.

Nearly one-third of U.S. teens use e-cigarettes. In 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Adm...

Most Young Vapers Aren't Using E-Cigs to Quit Smoking: Survey

Electronic cigarettes are marketed as an aid to quitting smoking, but most young people who vape say that's not why they indulge.

Instead, six out of 10 said they vape to relax and they'd miss the stress relief of vaping if they quit, a new survey sponsored by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) shows.

"We're hearing this narrative that people are vaping to qui...

More Teen Time on Social Media, More Eating Disorders?

The more often young teens turn to social media, the more prone they are to eating disorders, new research suggests.

While the study does not prove social media use causes eating disorders, it raises a red flag, said study author Simon Wilksch. He's a senior research fellow in psychology at Flinders University, in South Australia.

The study looked at close to 1,000 middle sc...

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