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Results for search "Kids: Misc.".

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Two-Thirds of Parents of Kids Ages 5-11 Plan to Get Them Vaccinated Against COVID: Poll

In some heartening news on the vaccine front, two-thirds of American parents of children ages 5 to 11 plan to get their youngsters vaccinated when COVID-19 shots are approved for that age group, a new survey shows.

"While we're encouraged to see that a majority of parents intend to vaccinate their children against COVID-19 once they are eligible, there is clearly more work to be done to h...

Nature Helped Many Kids Cope During Lockdown: Study

Children who spent more time in nature during pandemic lockdowns suffered fewer behavioral and emotional problems, British researchers say.

The investigators also found that children in wealthier families tended to increase their connection to nature during the pandemic more than those from poorer families.

The new study included 376 families in the United Kingdom who had children ...

'Feel Good' Hormone Won't Help Ease Kids' Autism, Study Finds

THURSDAY, Oct. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Despite hints of promise from early research, a new clinical trial finds no evidence that kids with autism benefit from nasal sprays containing the "love" hormone oxytocin.

Researchers called the findings disappointing.

But they said the study also offers important information: Some parents of children with autism are al...

Kids Can Carry High, Infectious Levels of COVID Coronavirus

THURSDAY, Oct. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) – From newborns to new adults, young people who get COVID-19 can carry high levels of the virus and spread it to others even if they show no symptoms.

That's the takeaway from a study of 110 people between 2 weeks and 21 years of age who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Researchers found that infants, children and teens were equall...

Kids With Autism Find It Tough to Read Hidden Emotions: Study

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- When you're putting on a brave face to mask disappointment or shedding tears of joy, kids with autism are likely to misunderstand how you're really feeling.

That's because they don't use context to identify underlying emotions, according to a new study investigating whether kids with autism are able to tell when one emotion i...

Helmets Can Saves Lives in ATV, Dirt Bike Crashes

New research provides further proof that helmets are essential for young users of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) and dirt bikes.

Wearing a helmet significantly reduces their risk of moderate or severe head injuries in crashes, and also lowers their risk of death, the study found.

"For neurosurgeons treating pediatric trauma patients, these findings are not at all surprising," said stud...

Golf Cart Injuries Keep Rising Among U.S. Kids

Golf carts aren't just for golfing anymore: They also abound in retirement communities, on farms, and at sporting and other events.

But the downside of that newfound popularity may be that an increasing number of children and adolescents are injured from the carts each year, a new study suggests.

A research team from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) found more than 6...

Bystanders Can Make the Difference for a Drowning Child

A drowning child has a much lower risk of severe disability or death if a bystander steps in, even without cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), new research finds.

"Bystanders play a critical role in preventing poor outcomes in childhood drowning by instituting safe, early and effective rescue and resuscitation of pediatric drowning victims," said author Dr. Rohit Shenoi, an attending phy...

Going Cordless With Window Blinds Could Save Your Child's Life

Blinds and window coverings might seem harmless, but their cords can be deadly for young children and infants.

The best way to keep children from becoming entangled in these cords is to replace your blinds with cordless versions, advises the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC).

"Children have strangled to death on the cords of window blinds, shades, draperies and other window...

For Kids, Accidental Burns Another Scar of the Pandemic

Accidental burns among U.S. children rose by one-third during the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study.

"COVID-19 and stay-at-home orders inevitably created a new dynamic between children and their social environment. One result was the increased risk of burns those children experienced," said Dr. Christina Georgeades, a study author and pediatric surgery resear...

Social Distancing Kept Kids From Getting Flu, RSV

Social distancing and mask mandates during the pandemic nearly eliminated cases of the flu and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) among children, a new study finds.

"Numbers don't lie. Face masking, and proper hygiene and isolation, can be effective means to protect the vulnerable groups, such as the elderly and young children, during the respiratory virus season," said study author Dr. Os...

Could an App Help Kids With Severe Ear Condition Avoid Surgery?

A pair of special headphones plus a free app might help kids with hearing difficulty due to "glue ear," a new, small study suggests.

Glue ear is slang for a condition called otitis media with effusion (OME), where thick fluid builds up in the middle ear. It's very common in young children but strikes older kids as well, and often occurs after a cold or sore throat. Usually, the fluid goes...

Picky Eating, Social Phobia Often Linked in College Students

Parents frazzled by their little ones' finicky food choices often sigh in exasperation, thinking: "They'll grow out of it by college."

Maybe not, suggests a new study from Bowling Green State University in Ohio. Some young people continue their picky eating into early adulthood, often restricting their diets to 10 foods or even fewer.

Such a limited diet can mean they're not getting...

Pfizer Seeks FDA Emergency Approval for COVID Vaccine in Younger Kids

Pfizer Inc. announced Thursday that it has asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for emergency approval for its coronavirus vaccine to be given to children between the ages of 5 and 11.

"We're committed to working with the FDA with the ultimate goal of helping protect children against this serious public health threat," the company said in a

Over 140,000 U.S. Children Have Lost a Caregiver to COVID-19

It is an excruciating statistic: One in every four COVID-19 deaths in the United States leaves a child without a parent or other caregiver, researchers report.

The analysis of data shows that from April 2020 to July 2021, more than 120,000 children under the age of 18 lost a primary caregiver (a parent or grandparent who provided housing, basic needs and care), and about 22,000 lost a sec...

Kids With Food Allergies Are Often Targets for Bullies

Life is challenging enough for teens and pre-teens with food allergies. But bullying often comes with the territory, making their situation worse.

In a new study of more than 100 kids with food allergies, nearly one-third said they had been subject to some form of food allergy-related bullying.

"We also found that only 12% of parents reported that their child was bullied for ...

Abuse in Childhood May Shorten Adult Lives: Study

Child abuse and neglect can do significant and long-lasting damage, according to a six-decade review of British data.

The analysis of records dating to the late 1950s found that children who experienced physical or sexual abuse were more likely to die early as adults.

"Our work shows the long-lasting consequences that specific types of child abuse and neglect can have. The findings ...

As Kids Turned to Screens During Pandemic, Their Mental Health Suffered

Even in normal times, getting regular exercise and spending less time on screens can be good for kids. So it should come as no surprise that researchers discovered that kids who exercised more and used technology less during the pandemic had better mental health outcomes.

"Both as a pediatrician and as a mother, it was obvious that the circumstances of the pandemic -- school closures, re...

'Income Inequality' Could Be Dragging Down Math Skills in U.S. Kids

The United States has the highest income gap in the developed world, and it's affecting how kids do in school, new research suggests.

A new study reports that 10-year-olds' scores on standardized math tests were lower on average between 1992 and 2019 in states with higher levels of income inequality — a measure of how unevenly income is distributed through a population.

And the s...

Racial Disparities Persist With Childhood Cancers

Black kids and Hispanic kids with cancer fare worse than their white counterparts, a large, nationwide study finds.

"This study suggests that improving health insurance coverage and access to care for children, especially those with low [socioeconomic status], may reduce racial/ethnic survival disparities," Jingxuan Zhao, an associate scientist at the American Cancer Society in Atlanta, a...

Flu Shot Even More Important During Pandemic: Expert

Although the focus is on the COVID-19 vaccine, don't forget to also get your flu shot — it's important, an expert says.

"In the United States, it is recommended that everyone over the age of 6 months be vaccinated against the flu, and there are many vaccines available that will fit your need based on age and other important risk factors," said Dr. Pedro Piedra. He is a professor of mole...

A Simple Way to Boost Kids' Reading Skills?

A small fix might make reading a bit easier for kids with dyslexia, as well as their classmates: Increasing the amount of space between printed letters.

That's the finding of a small study that tested the effects of "extra-large" letter spacing on school children's reading speed and accur...

1 in 4 Parents Say Their Kids Have Been Quarantined Since School Started

One-quarter of U.S. parents report that their child has had to quarantine because of possible COVID-19 exposure since school started, a new poll finds.

The nationally representative survey of 1,519 people conducted between Sept. 13 and Sept. 22 included 414 people who identified themselves as parents of children aged 17 and younger. Still, about two-thirds of parents said they thought sch...

Active Learning Best for Students: Study

Whether you're a kid or a college student, you'll learn more with interactive activities, discussions, movement and even AI-enhanced technologies than you will just sitting still and listening, a new study suggests.

Learning methods that work best are hands-on, as well as what the researchers called "minds-on" and "hearts-on," using emotional and social support, the findings showed.

...

Black Parents Most Hesitant About COVID Vaccines for Kids: Poll

In a survey of parents in metro Chicago, nearly half of Black parents (48%) said they were reluctant to have their kids vaccinated against COVID-19, researchers say.

That's significantly higher than the 33% of Hispanic parents and 26% of white parents who expressed vaccine hesitancy, the findings showed.

"As vaccines are becoming available to younger children, and with continued spi...

Babies Know Best When It Comes to Play

Spend time with babies and you'll see they pick up items, bang them together and, often, chew on them.

That play is key to learning and development, but most research on infant play has taken place in a lab and not on a living room floor — until now.

"At a time in development when infants must acquire information about what objects are and what they can do with them, massive amoun...

Pfizer Sends First Data to FDA on COVID Vaccines for Younger Kids

Pfizer Inc. announced Tuesday that it has submitted initial data to federal regulators on the efficacy of its COVID-19 vaccine among younger children.

The company is also expected to submit the same data on kids aged 5 to 11 to the European Medicines Agency and other regulatory authorities in the next few weeks, CNN reported.

Last week, Pfizer released trial data that show...

Tough Choices: Chemo That Can Save Kids With Cancer Can Also Damage Hearing

The cancer drug cisplatin can save children's lives, but often with the side effect of hearing loss. Now a new study shows that young children are especially vulnerable, and the hearing damage may begin early in the course of treatment.

The researchers said the findings highlight the need to screen kids' hearing during each round of cisplatin treatment, to catch problems early.

Fruits, Veggies a Recipe for Mental Well-Being in Kids

Teens who eat lots of fruits and vegetables are likely to enjoy better mental health.

That's the key takeaway from a new study that also tied a nutritious breakfast and lunch to emotional well-being in kids of all ages.

"This study provides the first insights into how fruit and vegetable intake affects children's mental health and contributes to the emerging evidence around 'food an...

Weight Loss Surgery a Good Option for Severely Obese Kids: Study

Severely obese children who are unable to slim down should be eligible for weight loss surgery, a new study suggests.

The gastric sleeve procedure is safe and effective long-term, said a research team that followed participants as young as 5 for a decade.

"Lack of long-term data and some pediatricians' fears that bariatric [weight loss] surgery might affect children's linear g...

Depression During Pregnancy Raises Risk of Mood Disorder in Kids

When mothers suffer depression during or after pregnancy, their kids may be at heightened risk, too -- all the way into young adulthood, a new study suggests.

Of more than 5,000 kids researchers followed until age 24, those whose moms had depression during or after pregnancy tended to report more depression symptoms themselves.

That was true in their teens, but particularly in young...

Pfizer to Ask FDA Soon for Approval of Its COVID Vaccine for Younger Children

Pfizer plans to request approval for use of its COVID-19 vaccine in children under 12 soon.

"It is a question of days, not weeks," Pfizer chairman and CEO Albert Bourla told ABC News on Sunday when asked about when the company will submit vaccine data on children aged 5 to 11 to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Right now, COVID-19 vaccines are only approved for childr...

Mask Mandates in Schools Curb Infections, CDC Studies Show

Wearing masks in schools appears to sharply curtail the spread of COVID-19, despite the dominance of the highly contagious Delta variant, two new U.S. studies show.

Published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the reports found there were fewer outbreaks in schools that required masks.

In the first study, researchers focused on students in two Arizona counties, ...

For Boys, Sports Key to Mental Health

Trying to fit soccer or Little League into your son's busy schedule? Canadian researchers offer some compelling reasons to do so.

Little boys who play sports are less apt to be anxious or depressed later in childhood and more likely to be active in their early teens, according to the University of Montreal study.

"We wanted to clarify the long-term and reciprocal relationship in sch...

Weight Loss in Childhood May Protect Boys Against Future Infertility

Obese boys who lose weight may avoid fertility problems in adulthood, a preliminary study suggests.

Even short-term weight loss might partially reverse weight-related alterations in reproductive function, the researchers said.

Childhood obesity can have serious effects on adulthood health, including a risk of cancer, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Obesity has also been linked t...

New Tricks to Turn Your Fussy Eater Around

If your children are picky eaters, bribing or pressuring them will probably backfire.

But there are other steps you can take to help them get over their fussiness, researchers report.

Australian scientists reviewed 80 studies to find out more about fussy eaters.

They found that pressuring a child to eat, offering rewards for eating and stricter parenting methods didn't help....

Could Your Genes Be to Blame for Your Kid's Aversion to Broccoli?

Parents and their children often share numerous traits -- including a dislike for broccoli and other veggies in the same family.

Noxious enzymes from bacteria in saliva may be the reason why, a new study suggests.

Levels of these compounds are similar in parents and children, which might be why these vegetables are turnoffs for both generations, especially when the levels are h...

Childhood Trauma Linked With Higher Odds for Adult Neurological Ills

Kids who suffer abuse, neglect or household dysfunction are more likely to have neurological problems like stroke or headaches as adults, researchers report.

"Traumatic events in childhood have been linked in previous studies to a higher risk of heart disease, diabetes, riskier health behaviors like smoking and drug use, and decreased life expectancy," said researcher Dr. Adys Mendizabal...

Witnessing Abuse of a Sibling Can Traumatize a Child

Seeing a parent abuse a sibling can be as traumatizing as watching a parent hurt another parent, a new study finds.

And it can lead to depression, anxiety and anger, researchers say.

"When we hear about exposure to family violence, we usually think about someone being the victim of direct physical abuse or witnessing spousal assault," said researcher Corinna Tucker. She is a profes...

Parents of Hospitalized Kids Need More Info on Costs: Study

Having a child in the hospital is distressing for families, and not knowing what that stay might cost can add to that stress, researchers say.

A new study has found that three-quarters of U.S. families want to have conversations about the costs of care. Yet only 7% of families actually have had this financial counseling with hospital staff.

The research suggests that patients and t...

Intervening in Infancy Might Help Prevent Some Cases of Autism: Study

Infants may show early signs of autism, but a diagnosis usually isn't made until age 3. Now, a new study suggests that jumpstarting therapy might stave off that diagnosis altogether.

Researchers say their preemptive, parent-led intervention could have a significant impact on children's social development and longer-term disabilities.

"What we found is that the babies who received ou...

Which Kids Are at Highest Risk From COVID?

Older children and kids with chronic diseases are those most likely to wind up in the hospital with COVID-19, researchers have found.

Conditions such as obesity, diabetes and neurologic problems, among others, put kids at risk for severe COVID-19, according to a new U.S. study.

"There's a myth circulating out there that children don't get sick from COVID-19, and that's kind of ...

Pandemic Changed Families' Eating Habits, for Good and Bad: Poll

Over the past year and a half, the coronavirus pandemic has remade so much of everyday life, including the foods families eat.

In many families, that's been a good thing, with half cooking at home more often and two-thirds making healthier food choices, according to a nationwide poll of U.S. parents. For about 20% of parents, many of whom said they felt stressed-out and busy, the pandemic...

Neighborhood Gun Violence Means Worse Mental Health for Kids

Living within a few blocks of a shooting increases the risk that a child will end up visiting the emergency department for mental health-related problems, researchers say.

The new study found significant increases in mental health-related ER visits in the two weeks after a neighborhood shooting, especially among kids who lived closest to it and those exposed to multiple shootings.

"...

Doctors Often Miss Signs of Type 1 Diabetes in Kids

Potentially dangerous symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children are not always immediately recognized by primary care providers, new research suggests.

In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas fails to make enough insulin, the hormone that helps regulate blood sugar used for energy by cells. Between 5% and 10% of cases of diabetes are type 1, which often first surfaces in childhood.

The Swe...

Watch Their Backs -- Don't Overload Those Schoolbags

After more than a year at home, children are heading back to classrooms across the country. But they're also toting heavy bags on their backs again.

A backpack that fits properly -- and is not overloaded with binders and books -- will help prevent injury.

"With a focus on getting back in the classroom and returning to 'normal,' it's easy to overlook possible injuries caused by...

Lower Dose of Pfizer COVID Vaccine Works Well in Young Children, Company Says

A smaller dose of Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine safely triggers a strong immune response in children as young as 5, the company announced Monday morning.

"Over the past nine months, hundreds of millions of people ages 12 and older from around the world have received our COVID-19 vaccine. We are eager to extend the protection afforded by the vaccine to this younger population, subject to r...

What Helps Your Heart More, Losing Fat or Gaining Muscle?

Shedding excess weight does much more for the long-term heart health of young people than building muscle, new research suggests.

It's not that gaining muscle while young proved to be a cardiovascular problem. It's just that losing fat offered bigger heart benefits.

"We absolutely still encourage exercise," said study lead author Joshua Bell, a senior research associate in epidemio...

Long-Haul COVID in Kids Typically Ends Within 3 Months: Study

In kids and teens, symptoms of long COVID rarely last more than 12 weeks, a new international study reports.

The researchers also found that exposure to the highly contagious Delta variant did not result in more serious disease in children compared to earlier variants, and that most cases of COVID-19 were asymptomatic or mild.

Despite those reassurances, the study did include a trou...

Child Obesity Rose Sharply During Pandemic

Childhood obesity was a worrisome issue before the pandemic, and now it's alarmingly worse, new data shows.

A U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study found a "profound increase in weight gain for kids" that is "substantial and alarming," Dr. Alyson Goodman, one of the study's authors, told the Associated Press.

For the study, researchers reviewed the ...

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