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Health News Results - 455

Dangerous Myths Keep Many Adults With Food Allergies From Getting an EpiPen

The EpiPen is a known lifesaver when someone with a serious food allergy eats something they can't tolerate.

Yet the auto-injection treatment is greatly underused in the United States, according to a new survey.

Just over half of at-risk adults said they had ever been prescribed the device, researchers found. And more than one-third of severe allergy sufferers mistakenly believe th...

Raise Med Dosages in Weeks After Heart Failure Crisis for Better Outcome: Study

When people with heart failure wind up in the hospital, it tends to become a slippery slope: They are more likely to be readmitted or die within six months during this vulnerable period.

Now, new research shows that ramping up doses of three heart failure medications within two weeks of hospital discharge along with more frequent follow-up visits cuts the risk of both hospital readmission...

New Drug Helps Tame Uncontrolled High Blood Pressure

Some patients with high blood pressure can't get it under control with standard medications, but a new study shows an experimental drug is up to the task of treating these tough-to-treat cases.

Why do some folks struggle more with managing their high blood pressure than others? When the hypertension i...

Study Compares 2 Common Diuretics Used in Heart Failure

Patients with heart failure are often prescribed a diuretic or "water pill" to prevent fluid buildup. A new study has found that two often-prescribed medications work equally well at reducing deaths.

"Given that the two different therapies provide the same effect on outcomes, we shouldn't spend time switching patients from one to the other, and instead concentrate on giving the right dos...

Paxlovid Lowers Risk of Long COVID

The antiviral pill Paxlovid not only reduces hospitalization and death after catching COVID-19: New research shows it also cuts the chances of long COVID by roughly 25%.

The drug, which combines a newer antiviral called nirmatrelvir with an older medication known as ritonavir, del...

Common Blood Pressure Drug Might Prevent Alzheimer's in Black Patients

A new study has shown the blood pressure drug telmisartan may offer new hope as an Alzheimer's treatment in Black patients. It did not show the same benefit in white people.

Learning how people from different ethnic groups respond to the same drug could be key in the fight against Alzheimer's disease, researchers say. Even though Black people are more likely than white folks to develop th...

CVS, Walgreens Announce $10 Billion Opioid Settlements

Years of litigation over the opioid epidemic could end soon, as the national pharmacy chains CVS and Walgreens announced Wednesday that each company has agreed to a nearly $5 billion settlement.

While neither of the companies admitted wrongdoing, the settlements are part of the fight over the drug industry's role in the epidemic that has led to 500,000 U.S. deaths in the past 20 years, t...

Topical Cream May Restore Skin Pigmentation in People With Vitiligo

For the millions of people who live with vitiligo, a disease that robs the skin of its natural color, a newly approved cream called ruxolitinib (Opzelura) is quickly becoming a game changer.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 24, 2022
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  • Study Debunks Use of Antidepressant Luvox as COVID Treatment

    A study testing drugs that are used for other conditions for their potential in treating COVID-19 has found that the antidepressant fluvoxamine (brand name Luvox) offered no benefit, at least at an initial smaller dose.

    Study participants took 50 mg of the medication twice daily for 10 days, hoping to treat mild-to-moderate COVID-19 symptoms. A control group took a placebo.

    “There...

    FDA Says ADHD Med Adderall Is in Short Supply

    People with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or narcolepsy may rely on the drug Adderall, but it is in short supply, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday.

    The Adderall and Adderall IR shortage is due to intermittent man...

    Knee, Shoulder Surgeries Without Opioids? It's Possible, Study Finds

    While politicians and health officials seek solutions to an opioid epidemic that kills tens of thousands every year, doctors who prescribe the pain medications are seeking alternatives for their patients.

    Minority Patients Less Likely to Get Newer Alzheimer's Meds

    While certain minority groups are more likely to be diagnosed with dementia than their white counterparts, they may also be less likely to be eligible for new disease-slowing treatments, a new study finds.

    Cognitive, or mental, impairment in Black, Hispanic and Asian patients is more likely to be caused by forms of dementia unrelated to the

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 4, 2022
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  • Two Cases Show COVID Virus Mutating Around Standard Treatment Remdesivir

    Patients with weakened immune systems could be inadvertently helping COVID-19 develop resistance to the antiviral drug remdesivir, a new study reports.

    After lengthy COVID infections, two kidney transplant patients on immune-suppressing drugs to prevent organ rejection developed a mutated version of SARS-CoV-2 resistant to remdesivir, according to

  • By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 28, 2022
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  • Already Taking a Blood Thinner? Adding Aspirin May Do Harm

    For many years, doctors have advised taking low-dose aspirin to help prevent first-time heart attacks and stroke. But increasingly, they're doing an about-face.

    The latest warnings come from University of Michigan researchers who reported that patients simultaneously taking another blood thinner,

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 21, 2022
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  • 'Life Changing': New Drug Eases Severe Eczema in Young Kids

    Sonia Dhaliwal knows exactly how bad childhood eczema can get.

    That's because her young daughter, Ariah Khan, has struggled with a severe case of the skin condition ever since she was a baby.

    Ariah's symptoms were relentless and debilitating until the age of 3. They included rashes; skin discoloration...

    Dogs Have Died After Licking a Common Chemotherapy Cream, FDA Warns

    Your dog may like to lick your hand or face, but if you're using a chemotherapy cream that treats certain skin conditions, you should not allow it, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration advises.

    The medication fluorouracil is fatal to dogs when ingested. People who keep the cream on a nightstand or counter sh...

    Is There a Best Time of Day to Take Your Blood Pressure Pill?

    It doesn't seem to matter what time of day or night you take your blood pressure medication, a new study finds.

    The results of a randomized trial of more than 21,000 patients with high blood pressure who were follo...

    All-in-One 'Polypill' Gets Heart Patients Taking Their Meds

    In a finding that proves convenience is key when it comes to sticking to a medication regimen, new research shows that combining three heart drugs into one "polypill" slashes the risk of dying from a second heart attack by 33%.

    "The results of the SECURE study show that for the first time that the polypill, wh...

    ADHD Drug Adderall in Short Supply

    Labor shortages at Teva Pharmaceuticals have made Adderall, a widely used attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drug, hard to find in some drugstores.

    But the U.S. Food and Drug Administration noted that there's no overall shortage of

  • By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 29, 2022
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  • America's Love Affair With Sleeping Pills May Be Waning

    Fewer Americans are turning to sleep medications to fight insomnia.

    After a dramatic rise in prescriptions for drugs like Ambien, the trend has ebbed, according to a new study, and fewer doctors are prescribing sleep medications

    Many Who Need Opioid OD Antidote the Most Can't Afford It

    Naloxone is a lifesaving antidote to an opioid overdose, but it may be priced too high for those most vulnerable to opioid-related death, a new study finds.

    Between 2014 and 2018, naloxone costs rose 500% for those without insurance, while out-of-pocket costs for the medication dropped 26% for people with i...

    Ivermectin, Luvox Fail as COVID-19 Treatment

    Two drugs touted as potential COVID-19 treatments, ivermectin and fluvoxamine, don't do a thing to improve patients' oxygen levels and keep them out of the hospital or the morgue, a new clinical trial has shown.

    Neither of the two repurposed drugs proved effective against COVID among overweight or obese patients who received them within seven days of symptom onset, according to results pu...

    Here's How the Inflation Reduction Act Will Lower the Cost of Health Care

    President Joe Biden on Tuesday signed the Inflation Reduction Act into law, making it the most significant health care legislation enacted in more than a decade.

    How will it affect health care?

    Millions of Americans covered by Medicare will see big reductions in costs for both health care and...

    Here's How New Federal Legislation Might Cut Your Drug Costs

    The Inflation Reduction Act is expected to bring out-of-pocket drug costs down for many U.S. seniors, but most of its benefits aren't immediate.

    Under the law, Medicare will now be allowed to negotiate the cost of some drugs. That should eventually bring down out-of-pocket costs for seniors with Medicare Part D prescription drug plans, according to John Clark, a clinical associate profess...

    B 8/11 -- U.S. Opioid Prescriptions Are Declining

    The United States has an opioid epidemic, but there's one bright spot in the fight against it: Prescriptions for these addictive drugs have declined for patients with private insurance.

    Amid guidelines over the past decade from governments, health systems and insurers aimed at reducing opioid prescriptions, previous studies have pointed to a nationwide drop in prescribing rates.

    <...

    Tough to Get Your Kid to Take Medicine? An Expert Offers Tips

    Sometimes it's difficult for parents to get their child to take necessary medication.

    One expert who spends part of her workday guiding parents through this challenge offers some suggestions to make the ordeal easier.

    Emily Glarum, a child life specialist at the Heart Institute at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, offers these tips: Be honest, practice it, provide choices, set a sch...

    Don't Use Luvox, Colchicine to Fight COVID, WHO Experts Say

    People shouldn't take the drugs colchicine and fluvoxamine to treat mild to moderate COVID-19, the World Health Organization (WHO) is warning.

    The antidepressant drug fluvoxamine (Luvox) and the gout drug colchicine are commonly ...

    'Stepped' Approach to Treating Diabetic Eye Disease May Be Best

    An off-brand medication for diabetic macular edema might prove just as effective in early treatment as its more expensive alternative, potentially saving patients thousands of dollars, new research suggests.

    The vision condition is a common complication of poorly controlled diabetes, which can damage bl...

    Cancer Med Might Be Powerful Treatment for MS

    A drug used "off-label" for multiple sclerosis (MS) is more effective than a standard medication at preventing symptom flare-ups, a new clinical trial has found.

    The drug, called rit...

    FDA Mulling Over-the-Counter Sale of Contraceptive Pill

    For decades, birth control pills in the United States have only been available with a prescription, but an application filed Monday with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for an over-the-counter pill might change all that.

    The lates...

    Aching Backs in Seniors: An Expert's Guide to Pain Meds

    Back and neck pain are often an unfortunate part of aging, but older adults can safely find relief with various medications, a new research review concludes.

    The review of 138 clinical trials breaks down the evidence on medication options for seniors with

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 8, 2022
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  • Could ADHD Meds Help Treat Alzheimer's?

    Could ADHD drugs also treat degenerative brain disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease?

    British researchers say there is good evidence that some medications used for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) - known as noradrenergic drugs - might also help treat key aspects of Alzheimer's.

    "...

    Need a Pill to Help You Sleep? You're Far From Alone, Survey Finds

    If you struggle to fall asleep at night, you are not alone.

    About 28% of Americans say insomnia is taking a toll on their daily lives, and about 64% say they take sleep aids to help them fall asleep or stay asleep.

    "

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 23, 2022
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  • Medicare Could Save Millions By Taking Cue from Mark Cuban's Online Pharmacy

    Medicare might want to take note of the pricing strategy of a new online pharmacy run by tech entrepreneur and "Shark Tank" judge Mark Cuban if it wants to save billions on prescription drugs, a new study suggests.

    Cuban's Cost Plus Drug offers certain generic drugs at cheaper prices by selling them at a markup of 15% plus a...

    Cost of Brand-Name Epilepsy Meds Is Soaring

    Managing epilepsy is an increasingly expensive process in the United States, with prices of brand-name anti-seizure drugs nearly quadrupling over eight years, a new study finds.

    From 2010 to 2018, the cost of brand-named epilepsy drugs, including meds like Vimpat (lacosamide), rose 277% overall, researchers found. Over the same period, the cost of generic drugs dropped 42%.

    "We as ...

    New ALS Drug Approved in Canada While Still Under FDA Review

    An experimental drug for the neurological disorder ALS was approved in Canada on Monday, but an ongoing evaluation of the treatment by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has raised questions about its effectiveness.

    A condition of Hea...

    You Can Drink Coffee With Your Thyroid Medication: Study

    It's OK to drink coffee soon after taking a liquid thyroid medication, a new study finds.

    Current product labels and treatment guidelines recommend patients take thyroid hormone replacement therapy on an empty stomach, but this new research shows that absorption of liqu...

    New Weight-Loss Drug Looks Good in Trial

    A newly approved drug for type 2 diabetes may be a game-changer for treating obesity, too.

    Given as a shot once a week, tirzepatide works on two naturally occurring hormones that help tell the brain that you are full. It may be as effective as weight-loss surgery.

    "About nine of 10 people in the study lost weight, and the average weight loss for the highest dose was 22.5%, which is ...

    Setting Time Limits on Opioid Prescriptions Might Reduce Misuse

    Here's a simple weapon to employ against the opioid epidemic: New research finds that placing time limits on prescriptions for highly addictive narcotic painkillers may reduce the risk of misuse.

    In 2019, 1% of opioid prescriptions from U.S. dentists and surgeons were filled more than 30 days after bei...

    COVID Can 'Rebound' After Treatment With Paxlovid, CDC Says

    COVID-19 can make a comeback after an infected person has gone through a round of Paxlovid, the antiviral used to minimize a bout with the coronavirus, according to an advisory issued Tuesday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    "Recent case reports document that some patients with normal immune response who have completed a five-day course of Paxlovid for laboratory-co...

    Gout Medicine May Also Help Fight Heart Failure

    The anti-inflammatory benefits of a common gout medicine may help save the lives of heart failure patients, researchers say.

    The medication, colchicine, could also reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke in patients whose arteries are clogged with cholesterol, according to t...

    Asthma, Allergies Raise Heart Risks, Too

    If you have asthma or allergies, you may be more likely to develop heart disease, and some medications may increase or lower that risk, a new review of clinical trials and lab research shows.

    "Many people think of asthma as a disease of the lungs, but there's an important link between asthma and cardiovascular diseases, such as coronary heart diseases, [high blood pressure] and more," sai...

    Could Asthma Treatment Raise Your Odds for Obesity?

    Adults who suffer from asthma often need to take corticosteroids to open up their airways, but the medications may have an unintended side effect: New research shows the treatment, particularly when taken in pill form, raised the risk of patients becoming obese.

    "

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 2, 2022
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  • Inappropriate Antibiotic Prescribing in U.S. Seniors, Black Patients Reaches Alarming Levels

    The majority of antibiotic prescriptions for U.S. seniors and Black and Hispanic Americans are inappropriate, a new report reveals.

    For the study, researchers analyzed federal government data on more than 7 billion outpatient visits to doctors' offices, hospital clinics and emergency departments nationwide between 2009 and 2016.

    Nearly 8 million visits (11%) led to antibiotic prescr...

    In Long Run, Antidepressants Don't Improve Quality of Life: Study

    Millions of Americans take antidepressants to combat low moods. But a large, new study suggests that these medications over time may do little to improve overall quality of life.

    "We found the change in health-related quality of life to be comparable or similar between patients that used antidepressant medications and those who did not use them," said study lead author Omar Almohammed, an...

    When Pot Is Legal, Prescriptions for Pain, Depression, Anxiety and Sleep Drop: Study

    When people have legal access to marijuana, they're less likely to take certain prescription drugs, new research suggests.

    U.S. states where recreational marijuana is legal have seen large drops in the use of prescription drugs for pain, depression, anxiety, sleep, psychosis and seizures, the researchers found.

    "These results have important implications," said study co-author Shyam ...

    Who Are the New 'Patient Influencers' on Social Media?

    Disability activist Gem Hubbard regularly shares her insights about life in a wheelchair with more than 75,000 Instagram followers, under the handle @wheelsnoheels_, and her YouTube videos boast more than 3.7 million hits.

    Hubbard, who hails from the U.K., is "increasingly known internationally for her work in furthering the horizons of people with and without disabilities,"

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 15, 2022
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  • Heart Groups Endorse New Class of Meds for Some Heart Failure Patients

    People who live heart failure with reduced ejection fraction can now turn to a diabetes drug to help them feel better, stay out of the hospital and potentially live longer.

    Three leading heart organizations -- the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association and the Heart Failure Society of America -- released

  • By Cara Murez and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • April 4, 2022
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  • FDA Advisory Panel Narrowly Votes Against New ALS Drug

    In a close vote, an advisory panel for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration decided not to recommend the approval of an experimental drug for the deadly neurological disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    The panel's decision had been closely watched, with patient advocacy groups lobbying hard for fast-...