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Results for search "Friendship".

15 Jul

HealthDay Now: Insulin Access

As the American Diabetes Association celebrated the 100th anniversary of the discovery of insulin, HealthDay spoke to to Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief scientific and medical officer of the group. Dr. Gabbay shared his thoughts on how to make insulin affordable and accessible to everyone who needs it.

Health News Results - 25

Friends, Family Key to Turning a 'No' on Vaccination to a 'Yes'

Public health officials and government workers are trying everything they can to promote COVID-19 vaccination — advertisements, news releases, cash lotteries, and even incentives like free beer, joints or doughnuts in some places.

But nothing sways a vaccine-hesitant person more than a word with a family member, friend or their own doctor, a new Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) poll revea...

Most Romantic Couples Started Out as Friends, Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, July 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Some think that romance begins when two strangers catch each other's eye across a crowded room. Others seek it out by swiping right.

But new research suggests that more than two-thirds of all romantic relationships begin as friendships.

It's a question that Danu Anthony Stinson and her collaborators have been asking for...

Even Preschoolers Want to Be in the 'In Crowd,' Study Finds

People aren't born understanding social norms, but kids do have a desire to fit in with the crowd from an early age, according to a new study.

Researchers from Duke University in Durham, N.C. found that when 3-year-olds were asked to behave in a certain way and did so, they weren't conforming just to obey an adult, but were going along with the group.

Kids begin to pick up on societ...

Feeling Down? Support Via Social Media May Not Be Enough

Looking for a morale boost or some solid encouragement? If so, socializing the old-fashioned way -- live and in-person -- will likely do more to lift your spirits than online interactions, new research suggests.

It's the key takeaway from a survey of more than 400 college undergraduate students.

"We wanted to see if the social support provided over social media was associated with b...

Talking Points: People Rarely End Conversations When They Want To

Ever been caught in small-talk you secretly wanted to end?

So has nearly everyone else, according to new research that finds that both partners in a conversation often want it to end sooner than it does.

The flip side is often true, as well. Study author Adam Mastroianni said that his team was "surprised to find that conversations also sometimes end before either p...

Loneliness Continues to Rise for Americans Under Lockdown

Loneliness, particularly among folks under shelter-in-place orders, is a growing issue for Americans during the coronavirus pandemic, new research finds.

More people report they are feeling lonely, depressed and even harboring thoughts of suicide as COVID-19 cases in the United States soar. And those who are chafing under lockdown or other stay-at-home restrictions appear to be at the gre...

Amid Lockdowns, Online Exercise Classes Help Seniors Feel Less Alone

Participating in group exercise classes is good for seniors and not just in the ways one might expect.

The classes reduce loneliness and social isolation, according to a new study. And early results suggest that's true even after the coronavirus pandemic forced those classes to meet virtually.

"As the demographics of our country shift, more people are living alone than ever before,"...

Staying Social Can Boost Healthy 'Gray Matter' in Aging Brains

Older adults who get together with friends, volunteer or go to classes have healthier brains, which could help them ward off dementia, according to a new study.

Researchers who used brain imaging to examine brain areas involved in mental decline found that greater social engagement made a difference in brain health.

Being socially engaged -- even moderately -- with at least one ...

Adult Life Tougher for Teens Who Had Controlling Parents: Study

Back off, Mom and Dad: Teens who feel their parents are overly controlling may have more difficulty with romantic relationships as adults, a new study suggests.

The study, which followed 184 teens, found that those with domineering parents had a future that was different from their peers: On average, they did not go as far in their education, and they were less likely to be in a roman...

Money Not a Good Measure of Your Self-Worth

When the Beatles sang that "money can't buy me love," they were right, researchers say.

"When people base their self-worth on financial success, they experience feelings of pressure and a lack of autonomy, which are associated with negative social outcomes," said researcher Lora Park, an associate professor of psychology at University at Buffalo, in New York.

These feelings...

Friends Matter for LGBT Health

Having a large social network of other people with the same sexual identity benefits the health of LGBT people, a new study finds.

Previous studies have found that discrimination and related stress can be harmful to the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people, so researchers decided to look at social factors that may reduce that harm.

The investigators...

Are You Lonely? Your Tweets Offer Important Clues, Experts Say

Analyzing people's tweets could reveal if they're lonely, researchers say.

Loneliness -- which has been linked with depression, heart disease, dementia and other health problems -- affects about 1 in 5 adults in the United States.

Researchers analyzed public accounts of Twitter users in Pennsylvania and identified more than 6,200 who used words like "lonely" or "alone" more ...

Tying the Knot Is Tied to Longer Life Span, New Data Shows

Married folks not only live longer than singles, but the longevity gap between the two groups is growing, U.S. government health statisticians report.

The age-adjusted death rate for the married declined by 7% between 2010 and 2017, according to a new study from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), part of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Posting All Those Selfies Online Could Backfire, Study Finds

Posting selfies on social media won't do you any favors in terms of likability.

A small new study finds that many people take a dim view of others who post a lot of selfies on Instagram.

Researchers at Washington State University conducted an experiment to determine which posts lead to snap judgments about the user's personality.

The upshot: People who posted lots ...

Staying Optimistic Might Lengthen Your Life, Study Shows

An upbeat view of life may increase your odds for living to a ripe old age, new research suggests.

The finding stems from a look at optimism and longevity among nearly 70,000 women and 1,400 men. It builds on earlier research linking higher levels of optimism to lower risks of chronic illness and premature death.

"This study took us further by suggesting that optimistic peo...

Stay Social to Help Cut Your Odds of Dementia

The evidence continues to mount that staying socially engaged as you age helps keep dementia at bay.

In a new study, British researchers found that being socially active in your 50s and 60s may reduce the risk of developing dementia.

The findings showed that people in their 60s who interacted with friends nearly every day had a 12% lower risk of developing dementia than ...

The Dangers of Being a People-Pleaser

Being thoughtful and caring are great qualities to have, but if you go out of your way to get people to like you, you could be a people-pleaser, with unfortunate consequences for your own well-being.

If you're always saying yes to others, you're likely giving up time spent on things that really matter to you. If you're always acting in a way that makes others happy, but not doing the ...

Kids With Autism 'In Tune' With Mom's Feelings: Study

Children with autism may have trouble interpreting facial emotions in strangers, but research finds some are as "in-tune" with their mother's expressions as kids without autism.

The study included 4- to 8-year-olds with and without autism who viewed five facial expressions -- happy, sad, angry, fearful and neutral -- on both familiar and unfamiliar faces.

Children without au...

Hate Those Stressful Office Parties? Just Fake It, Study Suggests

Though they often dread social events, many introverts find they're not as bad as feared and some have learned to fake an outgoing personality to get through the experience.

In the business world, socializing is a key to success, said Erik Helzer, who led a team that examined the psychological implications for both introverts and extroverts. Helzer is an assistant professor of managem...

Why Watch Sports? Fans Get a Self-Esteem Boost, Study Finds

When your favorite college team wins the big game, it can boost your self-esteem for days -- especially if you watch the game with others, a new study suggests.

Researchers assessed 174 students from Ohio State (OSU) and Michigan State (MSU) universities before and after a key 2015 football game. Michigan State, then ranked No. 9, beat No. 3 OSU on a field-...

1 in 3 Young Adults Suffers From Loneliness in U.S.

For young adults, drugs and distracted driving are well-recognized health threats. Far less attention is paid to loneliness.

But loneliness is common -- and it is a particular problem for people aged 18 to 24, a new study suggests.

"We have this stereotype of the lonely old person in poor health, and the robust, socially active young person," said James Maddux, a senior scho...

Poor Health Compounds Loneliness in Seniors

Getting older can be a lonely business, and a new survey shows that health problems only make matters worse.

The online poll of more than 2,000 adults, aged 50 to 80, revealed that one in four said they feel isolated from other people at least some of the time, and one in three say they don't have regular companionship.

Health played a role in just how lonely someone was. Th...

Bonding With Friends -- Without Food

Socializing with friends is great for physical and emotional well-being, but if all of your get-togethers are at restaurants or bars, it can be hard to stick to a healthy eating plan.

Try these ideas for having fun without placing the emphasis on food. Both you and your friends will benefit.

Turn your brunch group into an arts project. Whether you're quilting, knittin...

Ditch Your Leisure To-Do List

If the fun is often missing from your social activities or play feels like work, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have an explanation: You're probably overplanning.

With so many demands on your time, precise scheduling might be the only way to accomplish everything you want. But while that can help at work and with family responsibilities, applying it to leisur...

Friends' Vaping Could Pose Danger to Kids With Asthma

Add another danger that e-cigarettes pose to teenagers: A new study finds secondhand exposure to vaping may raise the chances of asthma attacks in adolescents with the respiratory condition.

Middle school and high school students with asthma were 27 percent more likely to have suffered an asthma attack if they'd been exposed to vapor from someone else's e-cigarette use, the researcher...

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