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Health News Results - 56

Biden Administration Buys More Monoclonal Antibody Treatments to Ward Off Shortage

As severe cases of COVID-19 rise and demand surges for monoclonal antibody treatments, the U.S. government is ordering more from two key suppliers.

Monoclonal antibodies, which are lab-engineered immune system proteins, can help trigger a healthy immune response against COVID-19 infection.

The Biden administration has also taken over distributing the therapeutics, to help avoid shor...

Appeals Court Backs Florida's Ban on School Mask Mandates

The law on whether or not students in Florida schools will be required to wear masks has changed again.

On Friday the First District Court of Appeal in Tallahassee reinstated that state's ban on school mask mandates, CBS News reported.

The issue has been in flux since July, when Governor Ron DeSantis signed an executive order barring school districts from requiring...

COVAX Cuts Global COVID Vaccine Supply Estimates By a Quarter

Fewer COVID-19 vaccine doses than expected will be available through the global COVAX program, affecting many less-affluent nations waiting on these doses.

The United Nations forecast last week that it would have about 25% fewer vaccines to distribute through COVAX this year — 1.4 billion compared to an earlier projection for 1.9 billion doses,

  • Cara Murez
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  • September 13, 2021
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  • Full Page
  • Judge Rules Against Florida's Ban on School Mask Mandates

    School districts in Florida can require their students to wear masks, despite the governor's order blocking mask mandates -- for now at least.

    A circuit court judge in Leon County ruled Wednesday that the state can't enforce Gov. Ron DeSantis' ban on school mask mandates,CBS News reported.

    "We're not in normal times. We are in a pandemic," said Leon County Circuit Judge...

    More Affordable Housing, Healthier Hearts?

    One of the keys to good health could be in the hands of those who decide zoning policies for their communities.

    Inclusionary zoning policies that provide for affordable housing were associated with lower rates of heart disease for those who benefited from these dwellings, according to a new U.S. study.

    "Many cities around the country are facing a severe shortage of affordabl...

    Pentagon Says Troops Must Start Lining Up Now for COVID Shots

    Unvaccinated U.S. troops must immediately start getting COVID-19 vaccines, says a memo issued Tuesday by Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin.

    The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, which recently received full approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, will be added to the list of required shots for U.S. troops. They'll be able to get their shots at their bases and from their commands worldwid...

    American Dental Association Pushes for Dental Coverage Under Medicaid

    Dental care should be a required part of Medicaid coverage for adults in every state, the American Dental Association and nearly 130 other organizations urge in a letter to Congress.

    The groups called on lawmakers to support and advance a bill called the Medicaid Dental Benefit Act.

    "Poor oral health hurts more than our mouths," the

  • Robert Preidt
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  • August 20, 2021
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  • Full Page
  • WHO Slams COVID-19 Booster Shots in Wealthy Nations

    Wealthy nations shouldn't be giving COVID-19 vaccine booster shots to their citizens while poor nations struggle to get first doses of vaccines, the World Health Organization (WHO) said Wednesday.

    The U.N. health organization called for a moratorium on booster shots until at least the end of September, even for the elderly, health care workers and other high-risk groups.

    "I understa...

    Lowering Medicare Age Could Help Close Racial Gaps in Health Care: Study

    Could reducing racial disparities in health care be as simple as lowering the age at which Americans qualify for Medicare?

    Yes, claims a new study that suggests lowering eligibility from age 65 to age 60 could go a long way toward addressing inequities in health insurance, access to care and self-reported health decline.

    Racial and ethnic disparities in insurance coverage fall by mo...

    Who's Most Likely to Refuse a COVID Vaccine?

    COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among American adults fell by one-third in the first five months of 2021, a new study finds, but distrust of vaccines and the government are still keeping many people from getting vaccinated.

    Researchers analyzed data gathered from about 1 million Americans a month between January and May as part of an ongoing national COVID-19 survey. Those who said they would ...

    U.S. to Stick With International Travel Restrictions

    The rapid spread of the highly contagious Delta variant around the world means that the United States will continue with COVID-19 international travel restrictions for now, a White House official said Monday.

    The Delta variant now accounts for 83% of all U.S. coronavirus cases, according to the U.S. Ce...

    Many Hit Hard by Pandemic Now Swamped by Medical Debt

    The coronavirus pandemic has left plenty of Americans saddled with medical bills they can't pay, a new survey reveals.

    More than 50% of those who were infected with COVID-19 or who lost income due to the pandemic are now struggling with medical debt, according to researchers from The Commonwealth Fund, a nonprofit organization that advocates a high-performing health care system.

    "T...

    Is Medicare Overspending? Costco Prices Much Less for Generic Drugs

    Can Costco beat Medicare Part D when it comes to prescription drug prices?

    Apparently so, claims a new study that found that roughly half of generic medications were cheaper when purchased from the discount retailer than from the government program.

    The researchers compared the prices paid by Medicare Part D plans (including patient out-of-pocket payments) for 184 generic prescripti...

    Novavax's COVID Vaccine Shines in Latest Trial

    Novavax, a Maryland biotechnology company that has struggled mightily with delays in developing its coronavirus vaccine, announced Monday that its two-shot regimen was over 90% effective overall in a trial that unfolded even as more contagious variants emerged.

    Among 30,000 volunteers - all of them from either the United States or Mexico - vaccinated people were completely protected ...

    Girl's Tragedy Has Parents Calling for Changes to Car Design

    Jay-Fay Fraser was in the back seat of her father's sedan, heading home from feeding the homeless on Thanksgiving 2016, when another car rear-ended them on the highway.

    The driver's seat collapsed backward from the sudden force of the rear impact, slamming into Jay-Fay's head, her mother, Michelle Fraser, recounted.

    "She lurched forward, the seat collapsed backward, and it basically...

    There's Been a Shift in Who's Funding Alzheimer's Research

    The U.S. government and nonprofits are replacing drug companies as the main drivers of Alzheimer's disease research, two new studies show.

    The findings are from an analysis of national data by Jeffrey Cummings, a research professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas School of Integrated Health Sciences.

    In one study, his team found that the number of Alzheimer's clinical trials ...

    It's Still Tough to Find Prices on Most U.S. Hospital Websites

    U.S. hospitals have been required to make their prices public since 2019, but 18 months into the rule more than half weren't doing it, a new study finds.

    In 2018, the Trump administration issued a rule requiring hospitals to publish their "chargemasters" on their websites. A chargemaster is a rundown of a hospital's services, along with their list prices - something akin to the manufactur...

    FDA Poised to Ban Menthol Cigarettes

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday proposed a ban on menthol cigarettes, a move that the agency has tried before and one that public health experts and civil rights groups have pushed for years.

    Menthol cigarettes have been marketed aggressively to Black Americans for decades: About 85% of Black smokers use menthol brands, the FDA said, and research shows menthol cigarettes...

    Eviction Bans Helped Stop COVID's Spread in Cities: Study

    Eviction bans during the COVID-19 pandemic reduced infection rates not only in people who avoided displacement but also in their communities, according to a new study.

    "When it comes to a transmissible disease like COVID-19, no neighborhood is entirely isolated," said study author Alison Hill, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Johns Hopkins University, in Baltimore.

    I...

    Canada's Menthol Cigarette Ban Boosted Quit Rates: Would the Same Happen in U.S.?

    Could banning menthol cigarettes be key to lowering smoking rates overall?

    New research suggests it's possible, after finding that a ban on menthol cigarettes in Canada was linked to a large increase in the number of smokers who quit.

    The impact of the menthol ban in Canada suggests that a similar ban in the United States would have even greater benefits since menthol cigarettes are...

    Public Lost Trust in CDC During COVID Crisis: Poll

    Americans' trust in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has declined during the COVID-19 pandemic, an opinion poll finds.

    Researchers polled more than 2,000 Americans in May 2020 and questioned most again five months later. Respondents were asked to rate their trust of the CDC, the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) on a low-to-h...

    How Bad Was COVID in Your State? Governor's Party Affiliation Was Key

    Could whether your governor is a Democrat or a Republican have influenced how many coronavirus cases and deaths your state has seen during the pandemic?

    Yes, claim researchers who discovered a strong link between the two -- by late last summer, the odds of dying from COVID-19 was nearly twice as high in states whose governors were Republicans versus states with Democratic governors....

    Pandemic Is Hitting Hospitals Hard, Including Their Bottom Line

    U.S. hospitals are expected to lose billions again in 2021, leaving them in dire financial shape as the COVID-19 pandemic guts the industry for a second year.

    Hospitals could lose $53 billion to $122 billion in revenue in 2021, between 4% and 10% of their total revenue, according to an analysis prepared by consulting firm Kaufman Hall & Associates for the American Hospital Association.

    Bans on Evictions, Utility Shutoffs Are Curbing COVID Infections: Study

    Bans on evictions and utility shutoffs during the pandemic may not only be keeping people safe and warm in their homes: They might also limit the spread of COVID-19, new research suggests.

    Over the first nine months of the pandemic, the study found, U.S. counties with those policies reduced COVID-19 infection rates by about 4%.

    The impact on deaths appeared greater: Moratoria on evi...

    Pandemic Unemployment Benefits Helped Keep Millions of Americans From Going Hungry

    Expanded unemployment benefits, passed by Congress last spring to ease the economic pain of the pandemic, appear to have held hunger at bay for millions of Americans, new research shows.

    Called "The CARES Act" when it was put into effect nearly a year ago, the law expanded who is eligible for unemployment benefits and how long that coverage would last. A weekly federal supplement of $600 ...

    Retired Doctors, Nurses Will Be Approved to Give COVID Vaccine, White House Says

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Retired doctors and nurses are being called to the front lines of the U.S. coronavirus vaccination effort, the White House COVID-19 Response team announced Wednesday.

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is amending its rules to allow retired health professionals to administer COVID-19 vaccine shots, said Jeff Zients, the Whi...

    What's Killing Detainees at U.S. ICE Facilities?

    Thirty-five detainees in U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) facilities have died since April 2018, often because of preventable causes, such as COVID-19, flu and suicide, according to a new study.

    One of them was a Mexican citizen who had first entered the United States two decades ago. He died after a month in custody.

    Medical records indicated the 54-year-old man appea...

    Frustrations Mount for U.S. Seniors Seeking Access to COVID Vaccines

    Irene Greenhalgh, 83, considers herself a pretty computer-savvy senior, but even she got lost in a maze of websites and e-mails trying to get an appointment for her COVID-19 vaccine.

    One health provider's e-mail provided links to sites that were giving vaccinations, but the dates listed were a week old. A board of health's website proved glitchy and unusable.

    After weeks of searchin...

    Moves, Evictions Often Trigger Harmful Breaks in Health Care: Study

    Research brings grim findings for these economically tough times: People who must move because they can't make the rent often miss out on needed medical care.

    The study, of over 146,000 California residents, found a connection between unaffordable housing and health care use: Of people who'd moved in the past five years because they couldn't afford the mortgage or rent, about 27% had skip...

    New Dietary Guidelines for Americans Ignore Recommendations on Sugar, Alcohol

    The Trump administration rejected a scientific advisory group's advice Tuesday that people further reduce their added sugar and alcohol intake as part of the 2020 update to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

    An independent advisory committee charged with helping the federal government update the guidelines issued its report in July. Noting the U.S. obesity epidemic and increasing rate...

    COVID Vaccine Won't Reach All the World's People Until 2022: Study

    Amid hopes stirred by the recent rollout of an approved COVID-19 vaccine in the United States, a new study warns that shots may not be available to nearly one-quarter of the world's people until 2022.

    A second study estimates that 3.7 billion adults worldwide are willing to get the vaccine.

    Together, these two findings suggest that getting people immunized could be as big a challeng...

    Young Republicans Much Less Likely to Wear Masks, Social Distance: Study

    Republicans have downplayed the importance of masking and social distancing throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, and a new study shows that message has filtered down to the party's youngest voting members.

    Nearly one out of every four young adults from the Los Angeles region who identify as Republicans said they do not regularly follow social distancing guidelines, according to a report publ...

    Relief for America's Unemployed Could Be Crucial for Health

    Americans who lost their jobs this year due to the coronavirus pandemic have remained healthier and more secure thanks to expanded unemployment insurance, a new study reports.

    Struggling folks who received benefits reported that they were less likely to go hungry, miss a rent or mortgage payment, delay needed medical care, or suffer from anxiety or depression, according to the findings.

    Election Outcome Hasn't Lowered Americans' Stress Levels: Poll

    The U.S. presidential election may be over, but many Americans remain stressed about it, as well as a number of other worries, a new poll finds.

    The online Harris Poll survey from the American Psychological Association (APA) -- which included more than 2,000 adults aged 18 and older -- was conducted Nov. 12-16. It found that 27% of respondents said their stress has actually increased sinc...

    Politics Key to Americans' Views on COVID-19, Poll Shows

    The new coronavirus holds no political views. The pathogen's only aim is to infect, spread and thrive.

    But in what is surely no surprise in a deeply divided America, it turns out that your political views play a large role in your attitude towards COVID-19 prevention efforts.

    Republicans tend to be much less worried than Democrats about the COVID-19 pandemic, and therefore l...

    If Election Stress Is Getting to You, You're Not Alone

    For most Americans, the 2020 presidential election is a big source of stress, a new nationwide survey shows.

    Nearly seven in 10 adults (68%) surveyed called the election a significant source of stress, compared with 52% in 2016, the survey commissioned by the American Psychological Association (APA) showed.

    Former Vice President Joe Biden, a Democrat, is trying to un...

    Me, Me, Me: Narcissists Drawn to Politics, Study Shows

    It's all about him. Or her.

    New research supports what much of the electorate may already suspect: Many narcissistic people are drawn to politics, and that could put democracy in danger.

    As the researchers defined it, narcissism is a combination of selfishness, entitlement and a need for admiration.

    "Successful democratic functioning requires trust in institutions...

    November Election Can Be Held Safely, Experts Contend

    With the 2020 presidential election just three months away, new research suggests an election can be held safely if stringent steps are taken to lower COVID-19 infection risk.

    The conclusion follows a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigation that looked at what happened in the city of Milwaukee this past April after Wisconsin became the first state to hold ...

    Blacks Underrepresented in Cancer Drug Trials: Study

    U.S. government-funded clinical trials for new cancer treatments have more Black participants than those run by drug companies, but Blacks are still underrepresented in cancer studies, researchers say.

    The SWOG Cancer Research Network team analyzed data from 358 clinical trials -- 85 drug industry trials and 273 SWOG trials. They included nearly 94,000 patients who were being treated ...

    Illinois Mandated 'Stay-at-Home' Orders, Nearby Iowa Didn't: Here's What Happened

    Statewide stay-at-home orders appear to help slow the spread of COVID-19 above and beyond other steps like banning large gatherings and closing non-essential businesses.

    That's the suggestion from a new cross-border study.

    Certain counties in Iowa -- one of five states that didn't issue a stay-at-home order for its citizens -- experienced a 30% greater increase in COVID-...

    There Aren't Enough Coronavirus Test Kits to Safely Reopen America, Experts Warn

    Governors preparing to relax social distancing orders and reopen their economies are about to make a dire mistake that could cause COVID-19 cases to surge in their states, infectious disease experts warn.

    The United States' ability to contain future COVID-19 outbreaks rests on its ability to test hundreds of thousands daily for the virus, and the country is nowhere near that capacity,...

    Proposed Cuts in U.S. Food and Health Aid Would Hurt Families

    Families who lose benefits under proposed changes to the U.S. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) would face increased challenges to their health and well-being, according to a new study.

    The federal aid program provides health, nutrition and financial benefits to 40 million people.

    But the U.S. Department of Agriculture has proposed new rules that would reduce ...

    2 Million Lost Health Coverage or Access in Trump's First Year

    Two million more Americans didn't seek health care from late 2016 through 2017 because they couldn't afford it and/or lacked insurance, new research shows.

    The analysis of data from 2011 through 2017 also found that health care coverage and access improved with implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but reversed after President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans bega...

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg Released From Hospital After Health Scare

    Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was discharged from the hospital on Sunday after being admitted on Friday with chills and a fever.

    The news of her recovery and return home was issued by a court spokeswoman, ABC News reported.

    The 86-year-old was first evaluated on Friday at a hospital in Washington, D.C., after feeling unwell. She was then transferred to The...

    Survey Shows Americans Feel Stressed

    Mass shootings, health care and the 2020 presidential election are significant causes of stress for American adults, a new survey finds.

    The poll of more than 3,600 U.S. adults found that 71% of them said mass shootings are a major source of stress, an increase from 62% in 2018. Hispanics were most likely to say mass shootings are a significant source of stress (84%), foll...

    Stress of U.S. Politics Taking Mental, Physical Toll on Americans

    U.S. politics has been incredibly divisive in recent years, and will likely only grow worse as President Donald Trump faces possible impeachment over the Ukrainian scandal.

    So it's no wonder the stress of ugly national politics has started to affect the emotional and physical health of some citizens, as a new study suggests.

    Nearly two out of every five Americans say politic...

    Stricter Arsenic Standard Made Public Drinking Water Safer: Study

    Stricter U.S. government standards for drinking water have reduced arsenic violations by public water systems, proving such safety regulations work, researchers say.

    Public water systems provide more than 80% of the nation's drinking water.

    The new standard was introduced in 2001. Since then, the percentage of public water systems in violation fell from 1.3% in 2008 ...

    Booze Taxes Don't Make Up for Societal Costs of Excess Drinking: Study

    Alcohol taxes do little to reduce the burden on American taxpayers for the harmful impacts of heavy drinking, a new study finds.

    The cost of harm caused by excessive drinking in the United States is just over $2 per drink, with about 80 cents of that shouldered by government. But state and federal alcohol taxes bring in an average of about 21 cents per drink.

    That means mos...

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Treated for Pancreatic Cancer

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has just finished treatment for pancreatic cancer, the U.S. Supreme Court announced Friday.

    After the tumor was first diagnosed in late July, Ginsburg was given a three-week course of focused radiation at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, the court said in a statement. A bile duct stent was placed and the justice tolerated treatment w...

    Keeping the Lid on Global Warming Could Save American Lives

    A new analysis suggests the Trump administration should have considered how unchecked climate change might harm U.S. citizens before it pulled out of a pact aimed at slowing down the pace of global warming.

    In the study, researchers calculated that tens of thousands of lives in major U.S. cities would be saved annually if rising temperatures were curtailed.

    "Extreme heat is ...