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Results for search "Fitness: Misc.".

07 Apr

Getting Fit After The COVID-19 Pandemic

Heart experts offer 5 simple tips to fit physical activity into your day

08 Jan

Health News Results - 137

How Secure Is Your Health or Fitness App?

Your health and fitness apps may have privacy issues that put your personal information at risk, researchers warn.

"This analysis found serious problems with privacy and inconsistent privacy practices in mHealth [mobile health] apps. Clinicians should be aware of these and articulate them to patients when determining the benefits and risks," lead study author Muhammad Ikram and his co-aut...

New Disabilities Plague Half of COVID Survivors After Hospital Discharge

People hospitalized for COVID-19 are often discharged in much worse shape than before their illness - underscoring the value of preventing severe cases with vaccination.

In a new study, researchers found that during the pandemic's early months, almost half of COVID-19 patients discharged from their health system had some degree of "functional decline."

That's a broad category includ...

Amazon Tribe Could Hold Key to Health of Aging Brains

A native South American population that lives a pre-industrial lifestyle may have a slower rate of brain aging than the typical Westerner, a new study finds.

The study focused on the Tsimane population, whose roughly 16,000 members dwell in a remote part of the Bolivian Amazon. They live by farming, hunting, gathering and fishing - a lifestyle devoid of processed food, couch time and stre...

Healthy Living Helps Prevent Dementia, Even If It Runs in the Family

For people worried about developing dementia due to their family history, a preliminary study offers some good news: A healthy lifestyle might curb your risk.

Researchers found that older adults with healthy habits had a lower risk of developing dementia, versus the less health-conscious -- even if a parent or sibling had suffered from the brain disease.

Lifestyle choices did not er...

Stressed, Burned-Out Nurses Make More Medical Errors: Study

Critical care nurses with poor mental and physical health are more likely to make mistakes, but a more supportive work environment could improve the situation, a new study suggests.

"It's critically important that we understand some of the root causes that lead to those errors and do everything we can to prevent them," said lead author Bernadette Melnyk, dean of the College of Nursing at ...

Pandemic May Be Upping Cases of Severe Complication in Kids With Diabetes

A U.S. hospital has seen a surge in the number of kids with a life-threatening complication of type 2 diabetes.

The trend at Children's Hospital Los Angeles highlights how the COVID-19 pandemic may be affecting kids' health in unexpected ways, according to a new study led by Dr. Lily Chao, interim medical diabetes director.

Her team noticed in March 2020 that an increasing number of...

Getting Back Into Running After Lockdowns? Here's How to Do It Safely

If you plan to resume running after an extended break due to the COVID-19 pandemic, you need to ease back in, one expert advises.

"There are a lot of good programs, including Couch to 5K or C25K, that focus on increasing running slowly up to about 3 miles or 30 minutes," said physical therapist Grace Neurohr, a running and bio-motion specialist for the Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthope...

You Don't Have to Be Obese for Belly Fat to Harm You, Heart Experts Warn

Extra padding around the belly can spell trouble for the heart, even if you're not technically overweight.

That's among the conclusions of a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA), where experts lay out the heart risks of being "apple-shaped."

It encourages doctors to dust off those old-fashioned tape measures and make waist circumference part of patients...

In Breast Cancer Survivors, Obesity Raises Odds for Cancer's Return

Most people know obesity can lead to diabetes or heart disease, but excess weight can play a role in cancer, too, researchers say.

A new study found that breast cancer survivors who are overweight have a statistically significant increased risk of developing a second primary cancer - one not connected to their previous cancer.

The risk likely owes to shared risk factors between the ...

Cycling During Dialysis? It Might Help Patients

Dialysis is time-consuming, making it hard for kidney failure patients to keep fit. But cycling during treatment sessions could boost patients' heart health and cut medical costs, new research shows.

Dialysis can lead to long-term scarring of the heart, which can eventually lead to heart failure, so British researchers decided to find out if exercise could reduce these side effects.

Cloth Masks Do Make Workouts a Bit Tougher, Study Finds

A cloth mask can limit your ability to exercise, so it might be a good idea to alter your workouts when wearing one, researchers say.

Some previous studies have assessed how surgical face masks might impact exercise, but few have looked at cloth masks.

In a new study, researchers compared the exercise performance of 31 healthy adults (aged 18 to 29) who ran on a treadmill to the poi...

Is Your Spin Class Music Way Too Loud?

Turning down the music at your fitness classes won't affect the intensity of your workout, researchers say.

It's common for fitness instructors to crank up the volume -- sometimes to levels loud enough to damage hearing -- because they think it will help students work harder.

But researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine found there's no link between music volume ...

Spring Activity Can Sometimes Bring Stress Fractures

If you're getting back into walking, running or outdoor sports this spring after months on the couch, you could be at risk for a common injury known as a stress fracture.

It's a small break or crack caused by repeated impact on a bone that is starting to weaken from overdoing it, and feet are particularly vulnerable, according to Dr. Mark Drakos. He is an orthopedic surgeon specializing i...

Can Fitbits Be a Dieter's Best Friend?

Looking to shed some of those pandemic pounds? A new analysis says wearables like Fitbit and Apple Watch can help people slim down.

The researchers examined studies involving commercial health wearables and adults who were overweight/obese or had a chronic health condition.

After daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity for a period between a month and a year, participants lost ...

Some Folks Do Age Slower Than Others

People really do vary in how fast they age, and the divergence starts in young adulthood, a new study suggests.

The researchers found that by the tender age of 45, people with a faster pace of "biological aging" were more likely to feel, function and look far older than they actually were. And that relative sprint toward old age began in their 20s.

The findings, the study authors sa...

Unhealthy in Your 20s? Your Mind May Pay the Price Decades Later

If you're a 20-something who wants to stay sharp, listen up: A new study suggests poor health habits now may increase your risk of mental decline later in life.

Its authors say young adulthood may be the most critical time for adopting a healthy lifestyle in order to keep your brain sharp when you're older.

That's the upshot of an analysis of data from about 15,000 adults who were p...

'Slow Walkers' at Higher Odds for Severe COVID-19

If you saunter and shuffle instead of scurry when you walk, you are at higher risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19, British researchers warn.

For the study, the investigators analyzed data from more than 412,000 middle-aged Britons and found that among those whose weight was normal, slow walkers were more than twice as likely to develop severe COVID-19 and 3.75 times more likely...

Wearing a Mask Won't Ruin Your Workout, Study Shows

You're about to hop on an exercise bike and peddle your heart out, but will having to wear a face mask make it harder to breathe while you work out?

Not according to new research that suggests healthy people can safely wear a face mask while doing vigorous exercise.

The scientists assessed the breathing, heart rate, blood pressure and blood oxygen levels of 12 volunteers as the...

Masks Vital to Stopping COVID at Gyms, Studies Show

If you think you can safely exercise without your mask in a gym during the pandemic, two new government reports show you are mistaken.

Coronavirus outbreaks at fitness centers in Chicago and Honolulu last summer were likely the result of exercisers and instructors not wearing masks, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention discovered.

In the Chicago study...

Even for Preschoolers, Healthier Hearts May Mean Healthier Brains

The link between heart-lung fitness and brain health may begin at an early age, new research shows.

The study revealed that 4- to 6-year-olds who could walk farther during a timed test also scored higher on tests of thinking abilities and other measures of brain function.

Most studies of the link between brain health and heart-lung ("cardiorespiratory") fitness have focused on older...

Heart Attack More Likely to Kill Instantly in People Who Don't Exercise

Heart attack patients are less likely to die on the spot if they have been physically active, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 28,000 people in Europe who suffered a heart attack in order to see how active or more 'couch potato' lifestyles affected their risk of death.

They found that about 18% of patients died within 28 days of their heart attack. ...

No Gym Required: How Seniors Can Exercise During Lockdown

During the COVID-19 pandemic, it's crucial for homebound older adults to find safe and effective ways to exercise, an expert says.

At-home workouts can help strengthen muscles, improve balance, increase blood flow to the heart, boost the immune system and reduce stress, according to Summer Cook, an associate professor of kinesiology and an expert on senior fitness at the University of New...

Exercise Rehab Should Include Stroke Survivors, Study Suggests

Exercise programs that are standard for heart attack survivors can also benefit people who've suffered a stroke, a new pilot study suggests.

Researchers found that a three-month cardiac rehabilitation program improved fitness levels and muscle strength in 24 stroke survivors.

While the study was small, the researchers said it offers evidence of what's intuitive: People recovering fr...

Get Fit in Middle Age to Boost Your Aging Brain

Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in middle age and beyond might help keep your brain healthy, a new study suggests.

"Our study suggests that getting at least an hour and 15 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity a week or more during midlife may be important throughout your lifetime for promoting brain health and preserving the actual structure of your brain," s...

Gym Closed? You Don't Need Exercise Equipment to Stay Fit, Study Shows

If the pandemic has shut down your gym, you can still stay or get fit with a simple home exercise plan, researchers say.

The Canadian study was modeled on a fitness plan known as "5BX," or Five Basic Exercises, which was originally developed in the 1950s for the Royal Canadian Air Force. The plan doesn't depend on special equipment and can be adjusted to individual fitness levels.

...

Ready to Resume Sports?  Health Tips for Getting Back in the Game

Kids and teens may be eager to return to their regular sports routines when it's possible to play again, after being sidelined by COVID-19 restrictions.

But a sports medicine specialist in California says they should take it slow to avoid injury.

"I understand the excitement about returning to sports, but sometimes kids can get too excited and rev up too soon," said Dr. Bianca Ediso...

Tips for Making 2021 a Healthier Year

A New Year's resolution to take better care of yourself is one you should keep, especially in the era of COVID-19.

Wearing a mask, maintaining a safe distance from others and washing your hands frequently are going remain important in 2021. But don't forget to prioritize a healthy lifestyle that improves your overall health and quality of life, and helps prevent cancer, according to exper...

Instagram Influencers Making Guys More Body-Conscious

Young men's attitudes about body image and fitness can be affected by Instagram influencers, according to a new study.

It included 300 American men, ages 18-30, who were shown images of bare-chested men and male fashion images similar to those posted by Instagram influencers, as well as other types of images.

The participants were significantly less satisfied with their own bodies a...

Tired, Anxious, Overweight: How Lockdowns May Have Harmed Your Health

You might be onto something if you suspect your mental and physical health declined during the COVID-19 lockdown earlier this year.

Stay-at-home orders appear to have had an overall bad effect on people's health around the world, a global survey shows.

People reported that they gained weight during the lockdown, were less active, suffered from poor sleep, and experienced increased s...

Why Early Bedtime May Be Best for People With Type 2 Diabetes

It's long been said that early to bed, early to rise can make you healthy, wealthy and wise. Now, new research supports at least the health benefits.

A study of people with type 2 diabetes found that night owls -- people who go to bed late and get up late -- tend to get little exercise, putting their health at greater risk.

Understanding how sleep time can affect physical ...

Common Heart Defect Limits Exercise Ability: Study

People born with a hole in their heart may lose 20% or more of their exercise capacity as they age, even if the defect is repaired.

A ventricular septal defect is a hole in the wall separating the heart's pumping chambers. It can be surgically closed or left alone. People born with this defect have poorer exercise ability than healthy people.

A new study suggests that ...

What Athletes Should Know About COVID-19, Heart Damage and Working Out

With evidence mounting that COVID-19 can damage the heart, experts urge people to take precautions when doing vigorous exercise.

Up to 30% of patients hospitalized with coronavirus infection have signs of cardiac injury, according to Dr. Sunal Makadia, health director of sports cardiology at LifeBridge Health in Baltimore.

The prevalence of heart damage in milder cases o...

The Fitter Do Better After an A-Fib Treatment

Physically fit patients with the irregular heartbeat atrial fibrillation (AF) are most likely to benefit from ablation, a new study finds.

Patients who are less fit are hospitalized more often, continue to use anti-arrhythmic drugs longer and have higher death rates, researchers say.

"AF does not occur in a vacuum but rather represents one manifestation of the impact of po...

For a Longer Life, Any Exercise Is Good Exercise: Study

Want to live longer? Take the stairs, stretch or toss a volleyball around, a new study suggests.

Those activities were among several tied to lower rates of early death in an Arizona State University study of nearly 27,000 U.S. adults between 18 and 84 years of age.

Researchers wondered which of the more socially oriented exercises -- such as team sports -- contribute to lon...

Even in Dirty Air, Working Out Can Help Cut Risk of High Blood Pressure

Regular exercise can reduce your risk of high blood pressure, even if you live in an area with high levels of air pollution, new research shows.

The new study included more than 140,000 adults in Taiwan who did not have high blood pressure and who were followed for an average of five years.

The researchers found that those who were highly active and exposed to low levels of ...

Preterm Birth Ups Mom's Long-Term Heart Disease Risk: Study

Over a lifetime, women who've had a preterm delivery have a higher risk of heart disease, new research suggests.

The findings point to the fact that doctors should include a woman's reproductive history in assessments of heart disease risk, according to the researchers.

"Preterm delivery should now be recognized as an independent risk factor for IHD [ischemic heart disease] ...

Why Exercise? Researchers Say It Prevents 3.9 Million Deaths a Year

It's often said that physical activity rates are too low, but a new report takes a different angle and reveals the good news that exercise prevents nearly 4 million premature deaths a year worldwide.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data from 168 countries on the percentage of people who were getting recommended levels of exercise. The World Health Organization recommends at ...

America's Gyms Are Reopening and Your Workout Will Change

Gyms are finally reopening across the United States, but your workout will not be the same.

Some chains are offering individual workouts while group classes are still on hold, post-workout showers will be done at home, the 6-foot rule is in place for gym patrons, and sanitizing your hands and equipment frequently is a must.

"Y members should expect that facilities will look ...

Latest in Cancer Prevention: Move More, Ditch Beer and Bacon

The latest cancer prevention guidelines may change your typical backyard barbecue: Gone are the hot dogs and booze. In are veggie kebobs and maybe a swim or some badminton.

The American Cancer Society's new cancer prevention recommendations suggest, among other things, adding more physical activity to your days. About 20 minutes a day is the minimum, but 40 minutes or more daily is ...

Exercise Habits Key to Gauging Seniors' Longevity

Knowing how much older adults exercise can predict their odds of developing heart disease or dying early, a new study suggests.

Asking patients during atherosclerosis (clogged arteries) screening about their levels of exercise can help start treatment sooner, researchers say.

"With people now living longer, there is a growing need to determine how we can best detect latent...

Get Moving, Seniors: It's Good For Your Brain

Want to give your brain a boost? Go for a swim, take a walk, or spin your partner on the living room floor.

A new study finds that aerobic exercise can improve older adults' thinking and memory, even if they're longtime couch potatoes.

This type of exercise increases blood flow to the brain and counters the effects of normal aging, according to the study published online May...

Running Without Risk During the Pandemic

It's good for you to take a run during the coronavirus pandemic -- and safe if you take precautions, an expert says.

"It's good to get outside, get moving and get some sanity back in such a crazy time," said Grace Neurohr, a physical therapist and running specialist at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore.

Running "can provide some structure to your day and build a routine that can h...

AHA News: How to Get the Most Out of Health Apps

It's no secret that apps can turn your phone into a valuable tool for health and fitness. But with hundreds of thousands available, finding a good one can seem daunting.

It doesn't have to be.

Choosing an app does need to involve more than clicking and downloading, experts say. But you can take steps to improve the odds of finding something safe and helpful. You just need to kee...

Active Older Vets More Likely to Fall, But Less Likely to Get Hurt: Study

Physically active U.S. veterans are more likely to fall but less likely to get hurt when they do, compared with inactive older adults who didn't serve in the military, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed 2006-2015 data from nearly 12,000 veterans and nearly 37,000 others. Compared to non-veterans, vets had 11% more falls that didn't result in injuries, but 28% fewer falls...

AHA News: Nearly Killed in OKC Bombing, She Vowed to Change Her Life

Still in her desk chair, a window curtain somehow wrapped around her face, Amy Downs spent six hours in the rubble of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City.

Even before the truck bomb detonated - ejecting her from a third-floor window and plunging her into the basement, folded into a V-shaped space with her head wedged below the knees - Amy's life was a mess.

At...

AHA News: Most of the Nation's Teens Aren't Getting Enough Exercise

With the explosion of smartphones, teens have learned to swiftly scroll and type away using only their thumbs. But the rest of their bodies are woefully inactive - and the effects are far-reaching.

Only about 1 in 4 high school students get the recommended hour a day of physical activity, according to statistics from the American Heart Association. Screen time is partially to blame, ...

Pilates May Be Good Medicine for High Blood Pressure

Pilates exercises can do more than help strengthen your abs -- the moves may also lower high blood pressure and reduce artery stiffness, new research suggests.

Pilates is a workout program that focuses on core strength, flexibility, body posture and controlled breathing.

The new study included 28 obese women, aged 19 to 27, with high blood pressure ("hypertension"). The part...

AHA News: Amid Coronavirus Crisis, Exercise Caution When Exercising Outdoors

Even as government officials warn us to "stay home, stay safe" during the coronavirus pandemic, people are flocking to parks, trails and sidewalks to walk and bike away their cabin fever.

That might seem like a total contradiction. But according to health experts, it can be a healthy choice - as long as you exercise caution while exercising outdoors.

"Since most people don...

Fitness Key to Long-Term Weight Loss Success

The more fit you are when you start a weight-loss program, the more weight you could lose, a new study says.

"This research could help us improve the design of our weight-loss programs and suggests that adults with very poor fitness may benefit from additional exercise support during a weight-loss program to achieve higher levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and improve l...

How Many Steps Per Day to Lengthen Your Life?

For years, health experts have urged us to get off the couch and get moving. Now a new U.S. government study shows how much we stand to gain.

The study, of more 4,800 Americans age 40 and up, found a clear pattern: The more steps people took each day, the less likely they were to die over the next 10 years.

Those who managed at least 8,000 steps a day -- roughly equivalent t...

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